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Mid Life crisis

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 16th, 2017 1:13 pm
Newbie
Aug 16, 2017
22 posts
4 upvotes
Can't you just deal with the job, it pays the bills, not too bad isn't it?
to relieve stress, can't you just get a hobby?
Sr. Member
Feb 14, 2016
856 posts
262 upvotes
Public sector job's workload to pay ratio is incomparable to the private sector

Odds are, if you get a similar job in the private sector,
your workload will at least double with decreased pay and benefit
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 15, 2013
1432 posts
464 upvotes
Ottawa
JIB9022 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:56 am
Public sector job's workload to pay ratio is incomparable to the private sector

Odds are, if you get a similar job in the private sector,
your workload will at least double with decreased pay and benefit
Not quite. It's much, much more than double. We're starting at completely different baselines.
"Doing my part to encourage civil discourse by not downvoting."
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
7295 posts
374 upvotes
JIB9022 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:56 am
Public sector job's workload to pay ratio is incomparable to the private sector

Odds are, if you get a similar job in the private sector,
your workload will at least double with decreased pay and benefit
Like I said, I will need to be very careful picking a private sector job. I do agree most jobs in private sectors would be tougher than public sectors especially for small to mid sized companies. Even for big companies, probably only less than a dozen of them would be better than public sector (i.e. overall package; base pay, bonus, stock option, pension, etc).

Just want to be clear, if we compare IN GENERAL public sector and private sector jobs, public sector jobs will IN GENERAL be better especially if you factor in the defined benefit pension (provided you are able to stay long enough i.e. minimum of 20 years).
Last edited by rdx on Sep 13th, 2017 11:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
9319 posts
1137 upvotes
Toronto
rdx wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:20 am
Yes, if compatible positions are available, I would definitely consider moving to another position in another public sector organization. However, there are too many people waiting to get into those good ones ;)
Do you mind sharing the general field your employment is in? And Department. That way, can gauge how it would be in the private sector. I guess it's non-union?

From my understanding, once in the Public sector, it gives a huge leg up in getting into another department vs someone completely from the outside. That's why the other common way in except for right out of school is through contract as a way to get 'points'. Other than that, networking is huge. Reaching out to any contacts you might have. Don't be ashamed. Even if it's in a different field.

Given your decades of experience, you do know there is age prejudice when trying to get a new job right? Even with a referral. And sorry to say, once in the public sector, there is a consensus by the screeners/mangers in the private sector that public sector workers have unrealistic expectations about work/pay/hours. So would get overlooked more. And it's funny you bring up OPG. That's pretty much considered government, and not private. You will not find a AP clerk in the private sector for that pay you talk about.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
7295 posts
374 upvotes
I know OPG is in public sector. I brought that up to show the difference in compensation from different public sector organizations.
at1212b wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 11:18 am
it's funny you bring up OPG. That's pretty much considered government, and not private. You will not find a AP clerk in the private sector for that pay you talk about.
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Nov 28, 2016
3486 posts
51 upvotes
McKinsey wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 3:08 pm
To keep it simple. If you have ambition, leave. Such a waste to wake up every day to go to a job you don't look forward to.
Im glad to have a low stress job, same hours, weekend off, good benefits and good pay. Ive put my time in the trenches, moved multiple times over two decades, and worked multiple jobs at once. Im done climbing the ladder, isnt it the goal to have a stress free or low stress job as you get older. My life is outside of work anyway, my job doesn't define me.

Do I look forward to work, no. Do I hate being here, no. Id rather not work, but thats not the way life is. There is no way I would find a better job where I live for what I do, in fact its probably the highest paying, even in other public sectors doing the same thing. I got it by applying like anyone else, and now that I have my "golden goose" why would I give it up. For less pay, more stress and a chance at moving up in the private sector. No thanks

Ive got the type of job that when I was younger and a person had the type of job I do now, I would say "must be nice"

Ive come to terms that this is where I will retire, doesn't bother me anymore
Jr. Member
Dec 28, 2015
131 posts
27 upvotes
Westmount, QC
Ziggy007 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 9:43 am
Sounds like the government is now making you do a bit more work and you don't like it.

If you think you will have a better time in the private sector you are very mistaken. They will work you to the bone for less money and benefits and discard you as soon as your performance slips a bit.
Private will pay more for sure if it's a bigger company/corporation. But generally they will work you harder than govt for the better pay.

The big companies all have better compensation in salary, bonus, stocks and benefits than govt. Govt benefits aren't really that great
Member
Oct 3, 2009
429 posts
118 upvotes
I wouldnt stress too much... If they lay you off you will get a nice package from the gov and then after that EI will kick in. You could use that time to explore different interests/jobs and see if you can reposition yourself into something more enjoyable. It could be a blessing in disguise.
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 22, 2005
2532 posts
127 upvotes
In knowing that you don't want to work the "next" same job for the next 20 years and also knowing that the axe is coming soon (likely with a healthy severance), why don't you use your remaining paid time to either look for another job, be it private or public, or plot out your next steps?

I won't harp on the whole private/public argument as everyone has pretty much said it all (public = much less stress but less growth, private = heart-attack inducing stress but more growth), but in your circumstance, I'd strongly consider going back to school or training courses if you don't think you have the resume to back up a more fulfilling position. I'm pretty middle-aged too and would love the same opportunity.
Deal Addict
Mar 15, 2005
4985 posts
539 upvotes
MrWhiteCoffee wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 6:43 pm
Private will pay more for sure if it's a bigger company/corporation. But generally they will work you harder than govt for the better pay.

The big companies all have better compensation in salary, bonus, stocks and benefits than govt. Govt benefits aren't really that great
Private pays more at upper levels, but low to mid is definitely public sector. Not sure what level OP is at but unless he is senior manager or director he would be paid a lot less in private sector.

Also private sector benefits are rarely even close to public sector. The big five banks have been making billions of dollar annually recently while continually slashing away at their benefits packages. Most of them have moved away from DB pensions now to DC, and the health and dental benefits are quickly eroding or being offloaded as an employee cost
Jr. Member
Dec 28, 2015
131 posts
27 upvotes
Westmount, QC
Ziggy007 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:50 pm
Private pays more at upper levels, but low to mid is definitely public sector. Not sure what level OP is at but unless he is senior manager or director he would be paid a lot less in private sector.

Also private sector benefits are rarely even close to public sector. The big five banks have been making billions of dollar annually recently while continually slashing away at their benefits packages. Most of them have moved away from DB pensions now to DC, and the health and dental benefits are quickly eroding or being offloaded as an employee cost
Annual bonuses are double digits, stock even at manager (no direct report) level in private like big Telco, tech or big bank and etc.. DC of 10% is not bad at all. Flex dollars , wellness accounts, able to expense meals and Etc and a much faster career and salary progression

Big companies are a lot better than govt starting in even mid level (snr analyst and up)

Govt benefits are basic and don't have the flex of private. No bonuses and no stock purchase plan is just salt in the wound

I used to be in public and make so much more in private with way better benefits in similar role. I work about a hr more a day but I can work from home 2-3days a week now in private

My pension is better, just 10% of my gross pay dumped into sunlife and I don't need to contribute anything if I don't want to. They just dump 10% gross in. I usually use part of my bonus to match the 10% contribution and treat the exercise of stock options as bonus money

Never had that in public
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
7295 posts
374 upvotes
Intotheblue12 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 9:28 pm
I wouldnt stress too much... If they lay you off you will get a nice package from the gov and then after that EI will kick in. You could use that time to explore different interests/jobs and see if you can reposition yourself into something more enjoyable. It could be a blessing in disguise.
Thanks. I totally agree. I don't want to quit and lose the package. Wonder how I can get them to package me. The ongoing unreasonable requests are just killing us (not just me but all team mates). We always try our best to satisfy all requests, it just doesn't feel good and stressful to always have a feeling that we can't do our job and something we haven't finished. Some of our team mates are already actively looking for jobs. Imagine if some of them left, the situation would be even worst for those who are still there as all remaining tasks will then be on their plates......
Sr. Member
Sep 4, 2007
944 posts
319 upvotes
Edmonton
JIB9022 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:56 am
Public sector job's workload to pay ratio is incomparable to the private sector

Odds are, if you get a similar job in the private sector,
your workload will at least double with decreased pay and benefit
I would agree that this is true for most positions up to the manager level. Once you hit the junior executive levels, it starts evening out. For the most part, public service executives can never hit the millions of dollars of total compensation that private sector executives can, even if they have the same workload/stress/risk. A deputy minister is roughly equal to a CEO/COO, heads an organization of thousands, manages budgets in the tens of billions of dollars, and is probably making less than a junior partner at a big 4 accounting firm.
Sr. Member
Feb 14, 2016
856 posts
262 upvotes
frozenmelon wrote:
Sep 14th, 2017 11:50 am
they have the same workload/stress/risk. A deputy minister is roughly equal to a CEO/COO, heads an organization of thousands, manages budgets in the tens of billions of dollars, and is probably making less than a junior partner at a big 4 accounting firm.
nah, I highly doubt it, I can guarantee that even at Ex lvl at public sector's workload/stress/risk is not even close to junior partner at a big 4 firm; probably not even close to senior manager level. (only department that I can think of that maybe come close to being junior partner is CRA that's it)

Answer is just so clear...by answering How do you measure performance for the public sector employees? exactly.... how close their budget was compared to their "planned expenditure";

There is a huge difference between "managing" the budget and generating revenue or reducing cost ;
Again, workload/stress/risk between public sector vs private sector at ANY LEVEL is not even comparable

You cannot compare Spender to Revenue generators
Spending money is always easier, you just have to make sure you spend the right amount
On the other hand?, making money? increasing profit? reducing expenses? workload/stress/risk is simply not comparable

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