Green / Eco-Friendly

Are milk bags recyclable?

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  • Jun 12th, 2019 2:08 pm
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Apr 17, 2005
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Kitchener

Are milk bags recyclable?

In Waterloo Region takes plastic with markings of 1 - 6. And I've been recycling #4 bags.

Waterloo's publications only mention grocery and retail bags, are milk bags made of recyclable plastic too?
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Jan 8, 2002
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Peel Region told me they are.

They told me to wash them out and place it with the rest of the bags.
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Nov 19, 2005
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If it has the symbol on the bag, it is recyclable, else not.
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Sep 10, 2005
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AzN_RiverdaleCI wrote:
Jan 27th, 2008 9:34 am
If it has the symbol on the bag, it is recyclable, else not.
I don't think this is true in all areas. I believe that York Region, for one, doesn't take plastic bags regardless of whether they are recyclable or not.
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Aug 15, 2006
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Thunder:

Call your municipality and ask as each municipality has a different recycling program.
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Thundercloud wrote:
Jan 25th, 2008 8:49 pm
In Waterloo Region takes plastic with markings of 1 - 6. And I've been recycling #4 bags.

Waterloo's publications only mention grocery and retail bags, are milk bags made of recyclable plastic too?
I am under the impression that they are collected in Waterloo region. They are recyclable but it does depend on the region and what they collect. If you do find out differently, please let me know. I occassionally put them in the recycling although I generally use them as garbage bags since they fit perfectly in the small garbage cans we use in the bathrooms.
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Sep 4, 2007
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Solve the problem by purchasing your milk in returnable plastic jugs (e.g. from Mac's). :)
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2005
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supersnazz wrote:
Jan 31st, 2008 9:18 am
Solve the problem by purchasing your milk in returnable plastic jugs (e.g. from Mac's). :)
I really don't buy much milk, but perhaps you are not doing more for the environment by buying from Mac's Milk. If you have to drive to the convenience store to bring back your empty jug, it's using gas and contributing to pollution.
Things are not always so straight forward.
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Sep 1, 2003
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Sorry to revive an old thread here, but I have a question about the Mac's milk container program that maybe someone knows the answer to.

I've been buying milk from Mac's in the 4L jugs for over a year because I didn't like throwing away the bags (my city did not recycle plastic bags then, not sure about now as there have been some other changes...)

Someone was telling me that they *have to* melt down the jugs and remake them every time they are purchased/returned versus rinsing them out and refilling them. Something about they can only use 'virgin plastic'

This same person told me that he thinks they are simply putting the jugs in the municipal recycling program and pocketing all the unclaimed deposit money.

Any thoughts on this?

BTW: I can (and usually do) walk to Mac's from my house, unless I'm already driving by anyway.
Member
Nov 4, 2006
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You can't recycle plastic bags unfortunately. So no, they aren't recyclable.
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Oct 20, 2001
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Sauga
Andrewm wrote:
Mar 11th, 2009 1:39 am
You can't recycle plastic bags unfortunately. So no, they aren't recyclable.
Huh? Why not?

http://www.peelregion.ca/scripts/waste/ ... query=milk says:
* Milk bag (rinsed)
* Place all recyclable plastic bags in one tied plastic bag. Place this item securely in your curbside recycling box or apartment recycling cart.
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Aug 15, 2006
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pluto wrote:
Mar 9th, 2009 5:39 pm
Sorry to revive an old thread here, but I have a question about the Mac's milk container program that maybe someone knows the answer to.

I've been buying milk from Mac's in the 4L jugs for over a year because I didn't like throwing away the bags (my city did not recycle plastic bags then, not sure about now as there have been some other changes...)

Someone was telling me that they *have to* melt down the jugs and remake them every time they are purchased/returned versus rinsing them out and refilling them. Something about they can only use 'virgin plastic'

This same person told me that he thinks they are simply putting the jugs in the municipal recycling program and pocketing all the unclaimed deposit money.

Any thoughts on this?

BTW: I can (and usually do) walk to Mac's from my house, unless I'm already driving by anyway.
Everything that gets recycled is melted/broken/shredded down and remade due to possible contamination. The whole point to the recycling process is to reuse the items that have already been used instead of dumping them in a landfill and then using more natural resources. You are still reusing the jug, but you are starting from scratch.

Nobody knows the history of that milk container other than the end users. There could be ecol i or some kind of disease in the jug that a simple rinse out might not get rid of. Melting it down ensures that any contaminate is destroyed.
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Jan 16, 2003
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gordholio wrote:
Jan 31st, 2008 2:14 pm
If you have to drive to the convenience store to bring back your empty jug, it's using gas and contributing to pollution.
Things are not always so straight forward.
Same goes for washing a peanut butter jar for 5 minutes just to recycle it. It may waste more resources just doing that.
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Nov 2, 2007
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Toronto
mart242 wrote:
Mar 11th, 2009 1:34 pm
Same goes for washing a peanut butter jar for 5 minutes just to recycle it. It may waste more resources just doing that.
Perhaps, however it may waste more resources if you send it into a recycling plant to wash it. Rinsing out salad dressing bottles or bottled juice is easier than rinsing old crusty salad dressing or old dried up juice at the bottom.

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