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Are millenials getting the short end of the stick?

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  • Aug 19th, 2017 12:42 pm
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Feb 9, 2006
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Buggy166 wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 1:49 am
you do realize millennials started being born in the mid 80s and had to do the same, right? Face With Tears Of Joy
Nope mom and dad did it for them.
When they were teenagers they went to the theaters and were the rambunctious bunch that annoyed the hell out of everyone.
By the time they were old enough to be renting videos to watch at home, Netflix and Chill was a thing.

- an 80s kid.
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tebore wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 9:26 am
Nope mom and dad did it for them.
When they were teenagers they went to the theaters and were the rambunctious bunch that annoyed the hell out of everyone.
By the time they were old enough to be renting videos to watch at home, Netflix and Chill was a thing.

- an 80s kid.
Im also an 80s kid and was using a boom box with tapes into the mid to late 90s when CDs came to market. Ditto for VHS until DVDs were a thing.
I dont remember Netflix & chill existing in 1999, although Netflix got registered as a company in 1997.
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Buggy166 wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 1:05 pm
Im also an 80s kid and was using a boom box with tapes into the mid to late 90s when CDs came to market. Ditto for VHS until DVDs were a thing.
I dont remember Netflix & chill existing in 1999, although Netflix got registered as a company in 1997.
If my memory serves, they started out by mailing DVDs to your home so you don't have to go to Blockbuster.
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LeisureSuitL wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 1:40 pm
If my memory serves, they started out by mailing DVDs to your home so you don't have to go to Blockbuster.
One of the co-founders wanted to build an e-commerce company similar to then fledgling Amazon.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netflix

Marc Randolph admired the fledgling e-commerce company Amazon and wanted to find a large category of portable items to sell over the internet using a similar model. He and Hastings considered and rejected VHS tapes as too expensive to stock and too delicate to ship. When they heard about DVDs, which were available in only a few markets in 1997, they tested the concept of selling or renting DVDs by mail by mailing a compact disc to Hastings' house in Santa Cruz. When the disc arrived intact, they decided to take on the $16 billion home video sales and rental industry. Hastings is often quoted saying that he decided to start Netflix after being fined $40 at a Blockbuster store for being late to return a copy of Apollo 13 but this is an apocryphal story that he and Randolph designed to explain the company's business model and motivation.
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Buggy166 wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 1:05 pm
Im also an 80s kid and was using a boom box with tapes into the mid to late 90s when CDs came to market. Ditto for VHS until DVDs were a thing.
I dont remember Netflix & chill existing in 1999, although Netflix got registered as a company in 1997.
+1

Streaming wasn't in the mainstream picture until around 2010. Most Internet connections would not have been fast enough to stream video in 1999. Most computers may not even have been fast enough to do it well or efficiently :) DVDs were just starting to take off and replace VHS around then but people would still keep VHS around for recording purposes, since DVDs could only play.

So the early millennials would have been around 25-30 when streaming happened... I'm sure many of them remember VHS and DVD rentals and the concept of a trip to Blockbuster.
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Dec 23, 2008
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For sure anyone who didn't or wasn't lucky enough to buy or own a house in that 15 year span got screwed considering its the biggest purchase most people will ever make. It was an anomaly in history. Granted if you have good parents as a kid you would reap some reward from that as well if its passed on or they take a home equity loan to give you money or such.
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Nov 24, 2013
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tebore wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 9:26 am
Nope mom and dad did it for them.
When they were teenagers they went to the theaters and were the rambunctious bunch that annoyed the hell out of everyone.
By the time they were old enough to be renting videos to watch at home, Netflix and Chill was a thing.

- an 80s kid.
I'm a millennial and I'm 32. All older millennials have strong memories of VHS rentals, browsing through Blockbuster, rewinding, late fees, etc. Anyone older than ~24 or so is old enough to have gone to a video store on the weekend to pick out a VHS tape. DVDs were still new and high end in '98/'99, and streaming didn't take off until this decade (though there were things like pay per view).
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Dec 6, 2006
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Mike15 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 12:10 pm
I'm a millennial and I'm 32. All older millennials have strong memories of VHS rentals, browsing through Blockbuster, rewinding, late fees, etc. Anyone older than ~24 or so is old enough to have gone to a video store on the weekend to pick out a VHS tape. DVDs were still new and high end in '98/'99, and streaming didn't take off until this decade (though there were things like pay per view).
Good old memory. Renting in stores was a completely different experience than online. As much there are available online, i find i either be selecting from the "recommended" videos and something i search for knowing the titles from somewhere else. In stores renting had that exp of simply browsing eveything with a few glances and having smth unexpected you may be interested in.
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Mike15 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 12:10 pm
I'm a millennial and I'm 32. All older millennials have strong memories of VHS rentals, browsing through Blockbuster, rewinding, late fees, etc. Anyone older than ~24 or so is old enough to have gone to a video store on the weekend to pick out a VHS tape. DVDs were still new and high end in '98/'99, and streaming didn't take off until this decade (though there were things like pay per view).
But was it really you renting it or was it a trip with Mom and dad?

By the time I was old enough to get my own membership I was out all the time or I just downloaded movies.
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tebore wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 12:21 pm
But was it really you renting it or was it a trip with Mom and dad?

By the time I was old enough to get my own membership I was out all the time or I just downloaded movies.
Usually sleepovers at a friend's house, picking out movies with said friend, and either parents paying for it or us paying it out of allowance. There was still the whole experience of picking out the movies, regardless of who paid for it. And of course by the time we were over 18, we did the same thing and paid for it, just with DVDs instead.

One underlooked factor that had a big impact on the video store ritual was the decreasing time between theater, home release, and HBO. When I was a kid, movies would take 6 months or more to come out on VHS and then probably wouldn't hit premium cable TV for a year or so. The timelines have steadily decreased to the point where we're at BluRay about 3 months after theater, and TMN/HBO in 5/6 months, Netflix in 7. "Waiting until it's on HBO instead of renting" was a thing back in the day, and even with video stores gone, it's even easier with a shrinking time gap between "rent on iTunes/GooglePlay" and "watch on the TMN or Netflix you already pay for."
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Oct 24, 2005
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The older generations had it pretty rough too. Hard to picture how they survived using magazines or just their imagination.
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Only peasants used VHS. True RFD ballers used LaserDisc.
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What millennials are experiencing is the birth of the new economy and wresting power from the institutions of the boomer/genx generations. It may not seem like it, but we are in the throes of a power struggle. Silicon valley, cryptocurrency, Anonymous, and the 'sharing' economy are all products of that struggle. The age of information has brought us the means to create and assess value seamlessly and openly, rather than feeding it through the rusty cogs of central banks, brokers and middle-men.

In the next year or so, I expect the first major ballast to be breached, and we will see a flood of wealth leave the financial institutions to be distributed in the open markets.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
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peanutz wrote:
Aug 6th, 2017 7:21 pm
... Millennials are certainly not the inventors of this [file sharing] technology, which was built to allow pirates to download free music, movies, porn, before the early crest of Millennials were even adults (I was 14 when I saw it.) It was Xers and Boomers. Thank you! ...
I have never illegally dl'd a song, movie, etc in my entire freakin' life.
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Becks wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 7:08 pm
I have never illegally dl'd a song, movie, etc in my entire freakin' life.
I'm not sure what your point is. You asked about Millennials. I countered with the fact that Xers and Boomers were pirating non-digitally, and created internet piracy before Millennials were even adults.

Why do members of your generation think it is ok to get music for free? Just asking a similar question that you did when you fingered Millennials, just widening the scope.

In fact, it could be said that Millennials had poor role models to look up to. What're the Xers and Boomers' excuses?

Answers to these questions may help to contribute at least part of the answers to your own.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_file_sharing

Oh wow, how *shocking*. Network-based file sharing existing in the 1970s? Maybe my ideas of history are questionable, perhaps Wikipedia isn't to be fully trusted, but even with a margin of error, it seems that it's possible that "free music" did not start with Millennials? And what does that say about the generations before them? And why would it be appropriate to target Millennials with the question, if it did not start with them?

My cousins had blank cassette tapes in the 1980s where they would record music off of the radio. They learned it from their friends and older peers, presumably. Gen Xers, free music --> did not start with Millennials. So, why??

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