Pets

Most Loving Cat Breeds

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  • Nov 8th, 2018 11:47 pm
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Banned
Dec 22, 2017
322 posts
129 upvotes
shumami wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 6:01 pm
Ragdoll. Hands down the best loving cat.

They are basically big loving babies the entire time and they don’t have an undercoat so they are easy to groom. Yet they look as fluffy as a Himalayan.

I have two and they are more like dogs than cats, esp male ones.
+1, I have a ragdoll and a dog . The ragdoll is almost too affectionate in that it always wants to sit on laps of people even visitors and wants to jump on the bed and basically comes whenever she's called.

The dog is just stupid in that it just begs for food or want to go out and won't stay on couch for long just to hang out as it wants to play with its toys
xxxray wrote:
Jan 17th, 2018 7:07 pm
If you want a loving animal get a dog. I would say 80 % dogs are friendly, loving , while cats its 20%.
Again depends on Breed, ragdolls are much more affectionate than any dog I've had
Deal Fanatic
May 1, 2012
7705 posts
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Markham
I have a ragdoll, best pet ever. I mean nothing can be a dog, except a dog...

But if you want a low energy, BIG & FLUFFY, dog-like, easy to groom, loving, mild tempered, and clingy cat... get a Ragdoll.
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May 22, 2005
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Thornhill
I adopted two short haired cats from the shelter (so who knows on the breed), bonded siblings, one male one female. Both are neutered. They were approximately 4 months old when I started fostering, they are now 9 months old.

The female watches me from afar, sometimes jumps on my lap and sits. Rarely purrs.

The male, possibly the runt, follows me, everywhere. He is a purring machine. Purrs very loudly and all the time. When I am occupied (computer, TV, on phone, cooking, cleaning, etc.) he whines, paws at my legs, jumps and paces on me. When I am in the washroom, he meows and scratches the door. When I am cleaning and put them in the bedroom, he meows and scratches the door. When I leave home, he whines and scratches the door. He kneads on my face and neck in the morning, and when I'm on the couch. He does have a medium risk heart murmur, the vet said it is hard to predict what will happen during the growing phase, but it might not be an issue if he reaches adulthood. Worst case scenario would be immediate heart failure.


Is there a way to ease the restlessness from the male? I started fostering and adopted because I was off work and starting a new job 6 months later. I start work next week and will be gone from home much longer then usual.
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May 9, 2006
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coriolis wrote:
Jan 18th, 2018 11:57 am
I adopted two short haired cats from the shelter (so who knows on the breed), bonded siblings, one male one female. Both are neutered. They were approximately 4 months old when I started fostering, they are now 9 months old.

The female watches me from afar, sometimes jumps on my lap and sits. Rarely purrs.

The male, possibly the runt, follows me, everywhere. He is a purring machine. Purrs very loudly and all the time. When I am occupied (computer, TV, on phone, cooking, cleaning, etc.) he whines, paws at my legs, jumps and paces on me. When I am in the washroom, he meows and scratches the door. When I am cleaning and put them in the bedroom, he meows and scratches the door. When I leave home, he whines and scratches the door. He kneads on my face and neck in the morning, and when I'm on the couch. He does have a medium risk heart murmur, the vet said it is hard to predict what will happen during the growing phase, but it might not be an issue if he reaches adulthood. Worst case scenario would be immediate heart failure.


Is there a way to ease the restlessness from the male? I started fostering and adopted because I was off work and starting a new job 6 months later. I start work next week and will be gone from home much longer then usual.
One of my cats was the runt that also had a heart murmur (and my shadow), but turned out fine. I'm sure your kittens will be fine. It's not like you were at your home 100% of the time.... or I assume you weren't. The good news is they have each other and they are bonded. They'll probably spend most of their time entertaining each other.

One thing you can do is leave out some of your clothes (preferably already worn so they smell like you). The kittens will snuggle with the clothes, so it acts as your stand-in when you're not home.

I did this when I went on vacation. I gave my keys to my friends (who lived in the same condo) to check in once a day to feed them and empty the litter. I also left them a fridge full of beer/wine & treats and said they can play with my consoles, watch TV, or whatever. I left out my clothes around the house too. When I came home my jacket's sleeves were tied in knots at the shoulders and wrists and my pants were all knotted up too. I call my friends asking what happened and they told me my runt was nuzzling in my jacket, but kept burrowing into the sleeve. They didn't know what to do because it looked like he was stuck. Slowly, his head pop out of the sleeve. Then his paw and other paw. Eventually he slid out. They said it looked like the jacket gave birth to a kitten. Fearing he would get stuck again the tied up all my clothes! Moral of the story: Maybe stick to t-shirts...
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Sep 24, 2006
576 posts
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Guelph, On
Rescue tabbies are the best kitties. And getting two close in age or brother and sister. Alyce and Sydney close in age but they lovr each other like bro and sister. Most loving cats. It all how you treat them. I am easy going, relaxed and so are my kitties.
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May 2, 2009
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xxxray wrote:
Jan 17th, 2018 7:07 pm
If you want a loving animal get a dog. I would say 80 % dogs are friendly, loving , while cats its 20%.
Yup. Cats like to be worshipped. Especially Siamese type breeds. I'd say the percentage of friendly is 20%, but loving, 5%.
Jr. Member
Jan 8, 2015
120 posts
56 upvotes
York, ON
anastasia1009 wrote:
Jan 18th, 2018 10:18 pm
Rescue tabbies are the best kitties. And getting two close in age or brother and sister. Alyce and Sydney close in age but they lovr each other like bro and sister. Most loving cats. It all how you treat them. I am easy going, relaxed and so are my kitties.
I second this. We rescued a feral tabby kitty. He won't stop cuddling at night (not that we want him to). All I have ever heard from tabby cats are good things. Male or female.
Coincidentally, we also have a Norwegian cat, someone posted earlier that they were loving cats, ours is a jerk Face With Tears Of Joy but we adopted him from previous owners that could no longer care for him. That may have been a factor to his behavioural issues, maybe wasn't raised right and enabled to do bad habits ?
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Oct 3, 2004
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shumami wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 6:01 pm
Ragdoll. Hands down the best loving cat.

They are basically big loving babies the entire time and they don’t have an undercoat so they are easy to groom. Yet they look as fluffy as a Himalayan.

I have two and they are more like dogs than cats, esp male ones.
Can you tell me which breeder you used? You can PM if you like.

Thanks
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Oct 3, 2004
3604 posts
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Anikiri wrote:
Jan 18th, 2018 11:14 am
I have a ragdoll, best pet ever. I mean nothing can be a dog, except a dog...

But if you want a low energy, BIG & FLUFFY, dog-like, easy to groom, loving, mild tempered, and clingy cat... get a Ragdoll.
Can you tell me which breeder you used? You can PM if you like.

Thanks
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Feb 9, 2013
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Saudi Arabia
Just go to the shelter and play with different cats, pick them up, hold them, etc. It's very easy to pick out the affectionate and loving cats. No matter what you do, please don't get a cat from those sketchy, amateur Kijiji breeders.
Sr. Member
Sep 16, 2006
871 posts
163 upvotes
Pickering
If you want affection get a small dog, not a cat. Cats are *******. I've had cats my entire life. Dogs aim to please you, cats aim to please themselves. And cats are so spiteful if you upset them a little bit they'll scorn you for weeks. Little furry @ssholes they are.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
850 posts
383 upvotes
British Columbia
The long and the short of it is: Every animal is unique.

I've seen thousands of cats, known many of those quite well, and for as many that fit a predisposed expectation, there will be 10 that don't.

Dogs have had selective breeding for attributes that meet our needs in a variety of ways and thus have a variety of traits more honed by breed. Their "breed standard" is often at least somewhat accurate. Meanwhile cats... not so much. If they've been selected for anything, it's which is the best mouser. Some breeds, mainly Siamese-types (and all various colorpoints including Ragdolls), seem to have the reputation as the "friendly ones". In general they've been bred to be more vocal and to have more of a velcro behavior.

BUT! This is not a rule. In fact it's so far from a rule... out of the 4 Siamese-type cats I've owned, only one really presented as the "typical" Siamese. She did have nystagmus however, an annoying eye condition common in Siamese-types. And her vocal traits simply sounded like sandpaper... which by the way, is the typical sound a Siamese makes. If you were in another room, the world needed to know about it. She also liked biting you. A lot.

The other 3 colorpoint cats I've owned? One was dumb as a post and couldn't meow. One is super unfriendly despite having her since a kitten, plus she has IBS, pancreatitis and UTI issues. Super expensive cat to own, many of the issues are predisposed to Siamese. The other likes nibbling on people. A lot. Sometimes too hard. And isn't that people focused... she also has had mast cell tumors on her ears since very young, one of the tumors had to be removed so her ear is deformed. If we ever have to remove one of the other tumors, an entire ear will need to be removed. Another lovely condition known to lurk more commonly in Siamese-types. She also requires L-Lysine daily to prevent herpies flare ups. She has a weak immune system.

The more inbred, typically the more issues - GENETIC ANOMALIES OF CATS. I would avoid a purebred with a 10 foot pole. Ragdolls have some crippling conditions and a shorter lifespan than many cats.

The best cats I've ever owned (and healthiest!) were the ones I tamed off the street. One of the best took several months of taming to prevent him from mauling me. Now he acts more like a dog and even has separation anxiety. Go figure. The best cats I've known are all just regular cats that don't need a breed label attached to them to make them special. Whether they were a tabby, black, orange... you name it. It doesn't matter what they looked like or what they descended from.

Go to a shelter and find the cat you want. You are not guaranteed a personality you want when going by breed/looks. And as I've learned, nature sometimes beats out nurture, so getting a kitten does not mean you are going to get a nice cat. Their adult personality does not emerge until they're older.

Every desirable trait found in a breed is also found in the general population of cats. It isn't that hard to find them even. It wasn't long ago that most "purebred" cats were just wandering the streets like all the rest of the cats. They aren't that far removed from one another, so before you pay up the nose for a purebred, seriously consider why you're doing it. You'll love whatever cat you end up with (unless you get my extremely expensive aforementioned cat that hates life ;)).
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Dec 27, 2009
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TrafficEng wrote:
Jan 18th, 2018 10:17 am
+1, I have a ragdoll and a dog . The ragdoll is almost too affectionate in that it always wants to sit on laps of people even visitors and wants to jump on the bed and basically comes whenever she's called.

The dog is just stupid in that it just begs for food or want to go out and won't stay on couch for long just to hang out as it wants to play with its toys


Again depends on Breed, ragdolls are much more affectionate than any dog I've had
Every dog I've ever had has been extremely affectionate (like you can't go to the bathroom without them wanting to be with you). I think affectionate dogs are far more common than affectionate cats.
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Nov 17, 2014
551 posts
263 upvotes
Ontario
Anikiri wrote:
Jan 18th, 2018 11:14 am
I have a ragdoll, best pet ever. I mean nothing can be a dog, except a dog...

But if you want a low energy, BIG & FLUFFY, dog-like, easy to groom, loving, mild tempered, and clingy cat... get a Ragdoll.
Have to be careful to completely box them in to these traits though, they all have their own personalities. We have a Ragdoll who is anything but low energy. He is highly demanding and always wants to play. Besides that he is like you describe. Spends most most of his down-time snuggled up with us.
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Jan 19, 2017
220 posts
46 upvotes
Chickinvic wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 9:06 pm
Not in my experience at all. Cats are a real crapshoot no matter how much affection they are raised with.
Not in my experience at all. We had two wonderful cats that were extremely loving and affectionate.

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