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Sr. Member
May 12, 2014
682 posts
290 upvotes
Markham, ON
ckay1980 wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 3:08 pm
There's a trick that I read online about get longer naps. When my son was about 6 months, and during the noon-ish nap, he would wake up after 45mins everyday. So at 40 mins, I would go in the bedroom and wait till I see him start moving like he's about to wake up but eyes still closed, then I would rub his back and make shh sound to make him fall back to sleep. I did this for about 5 days until he stopped waking up after 45mins. He slept for 2 consecutive hours after that.
This is called wake to sleep. I was successful at using it for two kids and not only for naps, also for their sleep at night. Found it in 'Secrets of the Baby Whisperer: How to Calm, Connect, and Communicate With Your Baby', by Tracy Hogg and Melinda Blau

OP, I suggest preparing your self for a rough two weeks and put the baby on a schedule. Might even be less than 2 weeks if the baby adjusts easily.
This is the book I followed, EASY method. I found it helpful to have a guide. The schedule allowed me to have some sort of routine and was able to plan housework and have naps myself.
-To make any methods successful both parents have to be on board. That was the harder part.
Sr. Member
Mar 24, 2015
735 posts
185 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
Bobberts wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 8:38 am
This is called wake to sleep. I was successful at using it for two kids and not only for naps, also for their sleep at night. Found it in 'Secrets of the Baby Whisperer: How to Calm, Connect, and Communicate With Your Baby', by Tracy Hogg and Melinda Blau

OP, I suggest preparing your self for a rough two weeks and put the baby on a schedule. Might even be less than 2 weeks if the baby adjusts easily.
This is the book I followed, EASY method. I found it helpful to have a guide. The schedule allowed me to have some sort of routine and was able to plan housework and have naps myself.
-To make any methods successful both parents have to be on board. That was the harder part.
Yes that's the book that was referred to! EASY method worked great for us too. Once the routine was set it was so much easier to plan everything else and I agree that the harder part is to have both parents on board (and grandparents if they are helping). I was on mat leave for a year but it was a challenge when my mother was helping for the first few months with my first son. He didn't fall asleep with her as easy as they were with me. The whole routine would be messed up and he would end up overtired and cranky. I had to start over again a few times.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
5093 posts
2428 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
I never napped. My daughter never napped. Each kid is different. I had a nephew who used to put himself down for naps.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 23, 2016
821 posts
222 upvotes
Interesting - my friend said that if babies don't nap, it can affect their development, but some here say it's not needed.

I'll check out the book too - thanks again!
*Faux transparency / censorship warning for RFD*
Sr. Member
Sep 3, 2013
750 posts
135 upvotes
Toronto
ckay1980 wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 3:08 pm
There's a trick that I read online about get longer naps. When my son was about 6 months, and during the noon-ish nap, he would wake up after 45mins everyday. So at 40 mins, I would go in the bedroom and wait till I see him start moving like he's about to wake up but eyes still closed, then I would rub his back and make shh sound to make him fall back to sleep. I did this for about 5 days until he stopped waking up after 45mins. He slept for 2 consecutive hours after that.
Sounds like the baby whisperer method. Same method I've been following to sleep train my LO.

OP, here's a rough guideline. Day time sleep are naps.
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Childrenssle ... sleep.aspx#
Sr. Member
Sep 3, 2013
750 posts
135 upvotes
Toronto
Bobberts wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2017 8:38 am
This is called wake to sleep. I was successful at using it for two kids and not only for naps, also for their sleep at night. Found it in 'Secrets of the Baby Whisperer: How to Calm, Connect, and Communicate With Your Baby', by Tracy Hogg and Melinda Blau

OP, I suggest preparing your self for a rough two weeks and put the baby on a schedule. Might even be less than 2 weeks if the baby adjusts easily.
This is the book I followed, EASY method. I found it helpful to have a guide. The schedule allowed me to have some sort of routine and was able to plan housework and have naps myself.
-To make any methods successful both parents have to be on board. That was the harder part.
Tracy Hogg has 2 books, written before she passed away in 2002 or 2004. I have the more recent one. Just take note that some info are outdated, like the breastfeeding part.

Wake to sleep never worked for my LO, I tried for 2 months. He's now 6 months and looks like the short naps are developmental and not sleep-training related. I suggest starting as early as possible; lesson learned for our next child. As early as they start gaining weight. It'll be a lifesaver 👌🏽
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 23, 2016
821 posts
222 upvotes
Thanks Kayceern

Turns out I needn't worry - he sleeps constantly through the day and then wakes up to feed. Maybe I'll re-assess this when he is 2 months
*Faux transparency / censorship warning for RFD*
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
1243 posts
527 upvotes
springdays wrote:
Oct 4th, 2017 4:30 pm
Thanks Kayceern

Turns out I needn't worry - he sleeps constantly through the day and then wakes up to feed. Maybe I'll re-assess this when he is 2 months
Sleep or lack of it was It bigges challenge for ur fist. I read pretty much every book out there, and even when to a seminar for it. I even started writing my own book because I had so much time at night because I wasn't sleeping. :facepalm: Crying Face

What I did learn is that babies sleep patterns do change as they mature. There are definate milestones where it changes, y for u just need to be aware of them. Get the baby in a good habit of learning fall asleep on his own, and then be prepared to research and be flexible. Sleep patterns change when they are teething, sick, gassy, learning to roll over only one way so they wedge themselves in the bars, pulling up, etc. Essentially all the time, so just figure a way that teaches to sleep and you may have to redo it. The first few months are really tough. I remember thinking I love my baby, but not sure if I liked her. Try to get some sleep yourself too.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 23, 2016
821 posts
222 upvotes
Thank Macx2mommy :smile:
*Faux transparency / censorship warning for RFD*
Sr. Member
Sep 3, 2013
750 posts
135 upvotes
Toronto
springdays wrote:
Oct 4th, 2017 4:30 pm
Thanks Kayceern

Turns out I needn't worry - he sleeps constantly through the day and then wakes up to feed. Maybe I'll re-assess this when he is 2 months
You're welcome.

I think it's good to know the different methods while you have a chance and before you want to initiate it; it's a very slow and constant, progressive process as you learn about your chosen method, learn about your child and as you try teaching an infant. I'd personally start doing a routine, as well as cluster feeding, swaddling and perhaps dreamfeeding in the first month for my next child. Definitely lesson learned.
Newbie
Mar 1, 2018
40 posts
4 upvotes
By 6 months, your baby will probably be taking 2 or 3 naps a day: one in the morning, one in the early afternoon, and another later in the afternoon.
At 3 to 4 months of age, many babies begin to follow a more predictable pattern of daytime sleep. This is a good time to start developing a nap schedule
Newbie
Feb 25, 2018
79 posts
21 upvotes
Your text to link here...

Do your best to give your baby a chance to nap at the same times each day.
But keep in mind that his temperament and natural rhythms will help determine how and when he naps.
Some babies nap for long stretches every day and settle easily into a pattern. Others do just fine taking shorter naps or napping at less regular times.
Newbie
Aug 31, 2014
99 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto, ON
But also take it easy with all the recommendations/methods/supposed schedules.

Someone told me about the EASY method and how it worked so well with their kid, so I tried it and for the life of me my little one won't conform. I was driving myself crazy trying to troubleshoot or figure out what to do. Now my son is 7.5months and I just follow his cues and do whatever seems to work.

(And you guessed it, my son has never been successfully "put down drowsy but awake")

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