Careers

Need Advice on finding the right program to get hired.

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 23rd, 2018 5:19 am
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 22, 2018
14 posts
2 upvotes

Need Advice on finding the right program to get hired.

Hi ,
I'm a new immigrant.been here only for 1 month. (Toronto)
At first i went to YMCA to get help for employment.they had different workshops and a mentoring program. but after going to all the workshops and sending my resume,i'm still unemployed. I feel like it was a waste of time.
I've heard about other programs that will find a job placement for you at the start and offers you paid internship.
but i don't know their names.
My career goals: I have background in IT but i want to transition to web development,i know the basics of web development. i need an internship to learn on the job.
I'm a young woman with a bachelor degree in IT.

Any advice would be appreciated.
8 replies
Jr. Member
Feb 7, 2018
150 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto ON
Finding a job in Toronto does not happen overnight. Going to YMCA is the right first step to do. Did you just visited their workshops or you did the language assessment too? If not, go back for language assessment. I have no idea which country are you from. If you are from a country with English as official language, then no need for language assessment. But if not, go for language assessment. Then YMCA will direct you to a LINC/ESL school (unless you choose French, then will be FSL school). Going for language school is the second proper step to do. No matter how good is your English, unless you are a native English speaker, it is never good enough.

As I said - job in Toronto is not found overnight. Good you visited the workshops. But keep in mind: Population of only Toronto is 2.8 million people. Population of only GTA (Brampton, Mississauga, Vaughn etc) is 6.4m people. This means a total of 9.2 million people. Let's say around 1/3 of them are looking for a job, which means 3m people. You are one of these 3m people and a big chunk of these 3m people is competing for your job. So don't complain you are losing time. Very rarely finding a job in Toronto is because of luck and it is fast. Usually it is result of perseverance and few months job search. Welcome to Canada! Or at least Welcome to Toronto!

What most people do meanwhile is to get one of the so called "survival jobs" - there is nothing shameful or wrong in getting one. When I arrived 2010 in Canada, unlike you I was Senior Software Developer (and I still am) and first winter in Toronto I was walking every day like 8-17km 9:00-5:00pm in the streets of East York and I was delivering flyers to the people's houses (as I said - in the winter), making 5$/hr (back then minimal for Ontario was 10$/hr, but I also had some leftover money brought from my country) and that was the job where I learned a lot about the city and the people, so I don't regret doing it, no matter how tiring it was.

I don't know if they still ask it, but in 2010 lots of recruiters also refused to offer me a job because I had no "Canadian experience", which is simply having a previous job in Canada, so keep this in mind too. No idea if they still ask for it.

Having a degree is nice, but nobody will care if you don't have actual development experience. I don't know what do you mean by "basics of web development". List everything you know. In the very least scenario you need to know HTML5, Javascript (Node.js and Angular.js) and CSS. You also need to prepare a portfolio.

You are way too new. 1 month is great, if you can afford not to work some more, better go explore the city, learn how to use TTC, how to transfer. The IT jobs are in the areas: Mississauga, Downtown and Vaughn/Markham/Richmond Hill. Get a home in one of these areas. And spend some time learning programming better, if this is what you want to do.

The only website you need to find a job is Indeed.

Everything else depends on how good is your resume, what you really know, what is your past employment history and finally your interview skills.

Forgot - first would be great if you volunteer/internship somewhere. Use Indeed and look for volunteering opportunities.

And prepare - it is common lots of companies will avoid you because you are a newcomer. So don't panic, just keep looking.

PS: And YMCA is a respected and good organization so you can trust them. You can contact recruiters and ask them to get you some training and then find you a job - I've been years ago to such company - I basically refused their training, because I had more knowledge than they offered, but don't count too much on recruiters. You should be the one looking for a job.

PS: Also I was never a volunteer before. I had way too much experience to allow myself to work for free. But will admit this is a good option for lots of people. After volunteering you get a reference and reference is what you need the most as a start. Now I am a volunteer aside of my job, but what I volunteer for is not related to IT in any way and I do it for pleasure, not for experience. But again - volunteering is a good thing. People respect when you volunteer. I am currently a volunteer IT career mentor in one other organization. We also provide some workshops, but YMCA is much bigger than us.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 22, 2018
14 posts
2 upvotes
thanks for the answer. i did the language assessment and the linguist in charge told me i don't need to attend English classes.she said that i should look for jobs because my English is good enough.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
7128 posts
4075 upvotes
Edmonton
I would second the "volunteer" approach. Also work on building a personal site that demonstrates some level of technical ability. While you're looking for a job, work at educating yourself on the skills you need; paid internships are usually for people who have completed the education portion of their career development and need help with the business/practical portion of the career work.

C
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2017
703 posts
133 upvotes
Toronto
Exactly in the same position as you a year ago.

Going to those YMCA or free newcomer centers imo was not a waste of time, I went to The Career Foundation on Yonge and St. Clair they helped me iron out my resume and cover letters. I feel that they are very knowledgeable on this regard.

We have a big disadvantage going up against people that have Canadian 'experience' or education so one needs to be really lucky and patient. What I did was send 10 to 25 resumes everyday to job openings i found online and I did this for about a month. I must've sent like 200 resumes and only 5 called. Out of those 5 calls I only got 2 face to face technical interviews and I got offered by one of those jobs.

So in my opinion, try to go to The Career Foundation @ Yonge and St. Clair. They offer free resume assessment and interview practice sessions.
Don't give up, keep browsing for jobs, look at company corporate websites and apply to their career page. Not all openings can be found on Indeed. Once you get lucky and get interviews, make sure to prepare and ace it.

Good luck!
Jr. Member
Feb 7, 2018
150 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto ON
This is the right approach. Sure, there are some positions which can't be found in Indeed, these are usually internally offered, but Indeed covers most of what's available. I remember I was also sending lots of resumes. Even for my flyer boy job I had a recommendation and I still to call the business owner 3 weeks in a row on the phone to show him I really want the job to get it.

And my experience is very tightly specific, for which when I am looking for a job, it usually takes me 7mo to get one. I usually send like 2-4 resumes daily. But for juniors, especially web devs, should be much faster.
Newbie
Jul 18, 2018
3 posts
1 upvote
One thing you can do is take a course that suits you in one of the private career colleges here in Toronto. Setup an appointment. They have career counselors that can help point you in the right direction.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)