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Locked: Need career advice - what can I do with a BBA?

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  • Oct 20th, 2004 9:16 pm
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Sep 15, 2004
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Need career advice - what can I do with a BBA?

Well, I need to declare my major very soon. Right now I'm completely stressed out with all my business requirement courses (Bloody calculus!), and looking at the min GPA admin of 3.06 which is almost impossible for me as I have to declare it within the next 2 semesters. And so even when I love business, the chances of me getting in is pretty slim unless I pull off 6 courses of B+ or more which is pretty damn slim. Man I hate how SFU is so competitive for bus. Now after doing the horrible brethen of requirements for business, I'm wondering if it's all really for me. Ironically if I switch to an arts degree now it will take me the same amount of time to get a double major in bus and psyc. So I can either study like hell and hope for miracles or just give up and do a BA.

So what has a BBA gotten for you? I just want to know if all this agony will be worth it. Things like fresh out of U Job offers/positions, estimate salary, likelihood of hiring with a BBA rather than a BA, have been plaging me for the last couple of days... If you have any experiences/advice in BBA job market, I thank you in advance.
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Oct 11, 2001
696 posts
Vancouver, BC
I'm a grad from SFU too with a BBA and if you are having trouble getting in now and don't feel confident then it's probably not for you. Getting in is hard, but staying in is even harder.

It is really competitive even 5 yrs ago, so now it must even be harder for anyone. Normally those who can't make it or drop up end up in Economics since that is the closest and where a lot of course can be transferred over.

This is just part of the filtering process unfortunately.

If you want to have a stable job after getting a BBA, you should concentrate in Accounting. Other concentrations you will have to be start at the very bottem (for most people). I think these days, most graduates work and continue to study in their related disciplane in order to acheive some sort of designation or licence.. i.e. CFA, CGA, HRMA, etc... in order to be more competitive in the work place.
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Aug 13, 2001
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Oct 20th, 2004 1:52 am

Isn't a BBA the BC equivalent of Alberta's BCom (Bachelor of Commerce)? I know Grant MacEwan (www.macewan.ca) has a Bachelor of Applied Business Administration with an accounting major that aims to get you a CMA or CGA in about 3 years after graduation. Depending on your major, you can do virtually anything you want. ud666 is right in that a BA (econ) is an equivalent of a Bcom or BBA, at least in the public sector and the industries I looked at.

Today's hiring environment is very different from 5 years ago. If you don't have a professional designation in addition to your major, it's hard to advance past your first entry-level job. Don't forget to take a look at the actual job postings for the position you eventually want to end up with, say, 10 years from now. So, look at the qualifications for the position of Director of HR or Director of Finance or CFO, in addition to the entry-level qualifications for accounting tech or whatever grunt job you need to get your professional designation. Trust me, you won't regret it. Otherwise you'll spend a few extra years making up for experience or education that you missed because you didn't think you wanted to do that kind of job. I speak from experience. :(
ud666 wrote:I'm a grad from SFU too with a BBA and if you are having trouble getting in now and don't feel confident then it's probably not for you. Getting in is hard, but staying in is even harder.

It is really competitive even 5 yrs ago, so now it must even be harder for anyone. Normally those who can't make it or drop up end up in Economics since that is the closest and where a lot of course can be transferred over.

This is just part of the filtering process unfortunately.

If you want to have a stable job after getting a BBA, you should concentrate in Accounting. Other concentrations you will have to be start at the very bottem (for most people). I think these days, most graduates work and continue to study in their related disciplane in order to acheive some sort of designation or licence.. i.e. CFA, CGA, HRMA, etc... in order to be more competitive in the work place.
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Sep 8, 2004
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I know ppl who have graduated with BBAs. The guidence counsellors actually told my friends to get a MBA instead. That was almost a decade ago. Many of them went for their MBA about 3 years after getting their BBA. These same ppl said MBA was much, much harder (as expected).

The BBA is the exact equivalent to a B.com and there are many, many B.com/BBA out there. You might be better off getting another degree, then a MBA. A B.com/BBA then MBA leads to a repeat of courses. That isnt bad if you want to get an accounting designation.. But MBA with another discipline would be better.

As for jobs, I know even back 7 years ago a MBA was the absolute minimum requirements to get a finance position for some of the larger companies. Some even wanted evidence you had or were heading towards an accounting designation. I would think that things have gotten more competitive since then. Check carefully the jobs postings for areas you want to get into, and see how many actually require a MBA.

Keep your options open.
Newbie
Jan 1, 2004
77 posts
Stick with the program and see if you can get in. If you don't get in do a BA or transfer to a different school that will let you do a BBA or equivalent. If you plan to take graduate studies stick with SFU. If a bachelor's degree is the only degree you want to do then try BCIT or Kwantlen which offers a business degree.

The job market now is really tough to break in. The labour shortage is not expected to happen until 5-10 years from now so that won't help you. If you graduate with a BBA it will be hard to get a job in your field. If you plug away and get the right breaks you will end of finding something that is related to your studies. If you graduate without a BBA it is almost impossible to get a job in business without starting at the bottom with little chance from promotion. Without a business degree the only option is either marketing or communications but you will need some courses/diploma to move ahead in that field. There are some people who do an arts degree than take a 1 year marketing or communications course to get a job.

In accounting these days you need a degree to get a job and move up. A two year diploma in accounting these days is almost worthless. 15 years ago the same two year diploma was a good start in accounting, not anymore.

Good luck.
kappamaki wrote:Well, I need to declare my major very soon. Right now I'm completely stressed out with all my business requirement courses (Bloody calculus!), and looking at the min GPA admin of 3.06 which is almost impossible for me as I have to declare it within the next 2 semesters. And so even when I love business, the chances of me getting in is pretty slim unless I pull off 6 courses of B+ or more which is pretty damn slim. Man I hate how SFU is so competitive for bus. Now after doing the horrible brethen of requirements for business, I'm wondering if it's all really for me. Ironically if I switch to an arts degree now it will take me the same amount of time to get a double major in bus and psyc. So I can either study like hell and hope for miracles or just give up and do a BA.

So what has a BBA gotten for you? I just want to know if all this agony will be worth it. Things like fresh out of U Job offers/positions, estimate salary, likelihood of hiring with a BBA rather than a BA, have been plaging me for the last couple of days... If you have any experiences/advice in BBA job market, I thank you in advance.
Sr. Member
Jan 2, 2003
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basis wrote:Stick with the program and see if you can get in. If you don't get in do a BA or transfer to a different school that will let you do a BBA or equivalent. If you plan to take graduate studies stick with SFU. If a bachelor's degree is the only degree you want to do then try BCIT or Kwantlen which offers a business degree.
Why the college if you don't want to do an MBA???

I know BCIT students who have received their Bachelor's degree and proceeded to complete SFU's specialized MOT (Masters of Technology?) under the MBA program there.

UBC flatly states that as long as the degree is a recognized 4 year degree from an accredited institution, they will accept it as the prerequisite degree to enter the MBA program. This implies (to me) that programs that grant degrees at various colleges should also be eligible (Capilano College, BCIT, Kwantlen, etc.) AFAIK BC doesn't offer 3 year degrees like Alberta & Ontario do.

I have no idea what the actual quality of the respective programs is...from what I've heard BCIT's is recognized in the BC workforce, and Capilano's while the most expensive of the lot is pretty decent...

No idea whether one has a better chance of post-grad employment coming from a college as opposed to a university though...but it's always an option especially since one would probably receive a good amount of transfer credit for course work already completed at SFU or wherever ...
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Mar 30, 2002
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What year are you in?

The general streams of BBA's are finance, accounting, marketing, HR, operations, and maybe SCM.

I just graduated with my BBA and am finding the job market somewhat tough. But, if you have co-op or good experience, you should have no problems finding a decent entry level position.
:hay:

[You got a dream, you gotta protect it. People can't do something themselves, they wanna tell you that you can't do it. You want something? Go get it. Period.]
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silentio wrote:I know ppl who have graduated with BBAs. The guidence counsellors actually told my friends to get a MBA instead. That was almost a decade ago. Many of them went for their MBA about 3 years after getting their BBA. These same ppl said MBA was much, much harder (as expected).

The BBA is the exact equivalent to a B.com and there are many, many B.com/BBA out there. You might be better off getting another degree, then a MBA. A B.com/BBA then MBA leads to a repeat of courses. That isnt bad if you want to get an accounting designation.. But MBA with another discipline would be better.

As for jobs, I know even back 7 years ago a MBA was the absolute minimum requirements to get a finance position for some of the larger companies. Some even wanted evidence you had or were heading towards an accounting designation. I would think that things have gotten more competitive since then. Check carefully the jobs postings for areas you want to get into, and see how many actually require a MBA.

Keep your options open.
You can get a job with your BBA, but if you want a senior management position, you will need your MBA.

I've actually heard the MBA is useless if you have your BBA. It's just a condensed, quicker version of the BBA. The only real benefits are the networking opportunities and the actual degree, but what you learn is very similar to what you learn in the BBA program.
:hay:

[You got a dream, you gotta protect it. People can't do something themselves, they wanna tell you that you can't do it. You want something? Go get it. Period.]
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Jun 9, 2003
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3 better options:

Dual CMA/MBA program (introduced 3-4 yrs ago)

CA program (don't do this if you hate auditing...you might get stuck in auditing hell for many yrs)

CFA
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thelefteyeguy wrote:3 better options:

Dual CMA/MBA program (introduced 3-4 yrs ago)

CA program (don't do this if you hate auditing...you might get stuck in auditing hell for many yrs)

CFA
Who offers the dual CMA/MBA program? I'm working on my CMA right now.
:hay:

[You got a dream, you gotta protect it. People can't do something themselves, they wanna tell you that you can't do it. You want something? Go get it. Period.]
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Jun 11, 2001
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I beleive York Uni offers that program. My GF is taking it early next year. Who knows... maybe you'll 'bump' into her :)
B40 wrote:Who offers the dual CMA/MBA program? I'm working on my CMA right now.
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Sep 8, 2004
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A joint LLB(law)/MBA is one of the hottest career paths at york. This dual stream is just a killer combination.
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Jan 2, 2003
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B40 wrote:
I've actually heard the MBA is useless if you have your BBA. It's just a condensed, quicker version of the BBA. The only real benefits are the networking opportunities and the actual degree, but what you learn is very similar to what you learn in the BBA program.
Wouldn't this just make the MBA that much easier? :D ;)

Do most Uni's not give advanced credit to those who have already completed a BBA degree?...I thought a student may be exempt from certain courses ?...or you could always do a "different" concentration if you're going full-time (ie if you did accounting in your BBA do finance in your MBA or something?)...donno - just throwing out ideas ;) ...
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sleepyguy wrote:I beleive York Uni offers that program. My GF is taking it early next year. Who knows... maybe you'll 'bump' into her :)
maybe i will :)
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Jan 1, 2004
77 posts
Unfortunately, getting a degree from a college or technical institute is not the same as getting it from a University. The local universities like SFU and UBC may not discriminate between a another university or local college program. This is probably because there is heavy local pressure to make it look fair.

But that is not the case necessarily if you go to Alberta, Ontario, or the US. These out of province uninversities will look at grades, courses, professors, and recommendations. By not being a full fledged university they will probably discount the grades and professors since they do not know much about the educational institution. It's kind of like comparing the universities: Berkeley with Oregon. Both are public universities and both play in the Pac 10 but coming from Berkeley is much more difficult and has a higher reputation than Oregon. Both offer equivalent quality of teaching for a bachelors degree but Berkeley is still preferred over Oregon.

Technical 4 year degrees are different from 4 year university degrees, namely the technical degree is more on the applied side rather than on breadth of study including the Arts. The 4 year university-college degrees are closer to the regular university degrees however these institutions do not have the same reputation as the more older and established universities. It sounds a little snobbish but that it the way it is. Getting into a top graduate university in the US would be difficult if the US university never heard of the college or technical institute. In the US the differentiation is more pronounced than in Canada. If you come from a name-brand university you get more choices than if you come from a local college. In BC if you come from UBC you get a better chance at being accepted to a top US school than from UVic or SFU. When transferring courses to other provinces the tranferability of courses is benchmarked to UBC. UBC is the benchmarked university but it doesn't mean that the education you receive from UBC is any better.

As for getting a job in the local market I don't think the employers really care if you come from UBC, SFU, or BCIT. If you completed the degree that is good enough.


ItzMe wrote:Why the college if you don't want to do an MBA???

I know BCIT students who have received their Bachelor's degree and proceeded to complete SFU's specialized MOT (Masters of Technology?) under the MBA program there.

UBC flatly states that as long as the degree is a recognized 4 year degree from an accredited institution, they will accept it as the prerequisite degree to enter the MBA program. This implies (to me) that programs that grant degrees at various colleges should also be eligible (Capilano College, BCIT, Kwantlen, etc.) AFAIK BC doesn't offer 3 year degrees like Alberta & Ontario do.

I have no idea what the actual quality of the respective programs is...from what I've heard BCIT's is recognized in the BC workforce, and Capilano's while the most expensive of the lot is pretty decent...

No idea whether one has a better chance of post-grad employment coming from a college as opposed to a university though...but it's always an option especially since one would probably receive a good amount of transfer credit for course work already completed at SFU or wherever ...
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