Pets

Need dog breed recommendations

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 26th, 2017 8:18 pm
Deal Addict
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Dec 27, 2009
3077 posts
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Ottawa, ON
Jack Russell's (which I have)!are doggie geniuses and I love them to death. However, I don't recommend them to everyone because they NEED lots of exercise and stimulation or you will have a brilliant dog with no choice but to make their own "fun" and you will not like their "fun" they create. Much like Border Collies in their need for stimulation and their high energy. They are often seen together actually. Many Border Collie people also seem to love Jacks (not surprising). You will see Jacks in agility and flyball also, along with Border Collies.

The point being that although Jack Russell's are extremely cute and playful, I do not recommend them to anyone who does not have the energy and time to devote to keeping them balanced and happy. They are a lot of work.
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Jan 28, 2014
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Magoo61 wrote:
Mar 11th, 2017 10:37 am
If your interested in Collies, look into a Shetland Sheepdog. Had 2 in my lifetime, very smart, gentle and most importantly great with kids. Like others have said a Border Collie is a working dog. I have 3 dogs, our American Eskimo (17 yrs. old), smart and has been an awesome dog. If you choose a long haired dog, be prepared for the "hair everywhere". Our Esky is brushed regularly, professional groomed every 3 months. It still amazes me even after 17 years where his hair appears.
Magoo61 - We too are amazed at where our Eskie's hair appears - of course all over my black clothes - but in the house it is everywhere - even when you think you have vacuumed it all up - think again. Of course it also loves to accumulate around table legs etc. etc. Our Eskie is a bear type with a lot of fur. He also is regularly groomed (and brushed in places where he allows it....). But at least the Eskie hair does not get caught in your feet as can easily happen with short-haired breeds.
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Apr 23, 2009
5136 posts
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South of Ottawa
Jaydenwhites wrote:
Mar 14th, 2017 5:02 pm
Shih Zu Hypo Allergetic!!
No such thing, unless it's a hairless dog. And it's hypo allergenic
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
564 posts
89 upvotes
Toronto
Maltese. I shed more than my dog. Only problem is grooming costs are through the roof. Daily combing/brushing too. So it's either daily vacuuming or daily grooming.
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Nov 1, 2001
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I would suggest a Standard Schnauzer. Very intelligent. Excellent temperament with kids. lower shedding. About 50lbs.
Sr. Member
Nov 20, 2008
704 posts
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I've had border collies and am now on my 2nd lab.

Listen,
whichever breed you choose, you'll fall in love with him/her and will probably adapt to your dog's needs (if you are a good dog owner). I assume you will be as you care enough to research breeds.

Border collies are amazing dogs. Probably one of the smartest breeds. But I wouldn't have one of them as a pet in the city personally. They just seem to be home on farms to me.

And I don't know if just small sample size or whatever but in my experience border collies become attached to one person more than say a lab. This might be ok with you if he will mostly be your dog but for a family dog this is sometimes not ideal.

And grooming..labs shed but with their short hair are much lower maintenance than a collie with the long hair.

Enjoy whichever dog you get!!!
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Kaz wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 12:54 am
I would suggest a Standard Schnauzer. Very intelligent. Excellent temperament with kids. lower shedding. About 50lbs.
Beautiful dogs.
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1C5 wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:19 am
I've had border collies and am now on my 2nd lab.

Listen,
whichever breed you choose, you'll fall in love with him/her and will probably adapt to your dog's needs (if you are a good dog owner). I assume you will be as you care enough to research breeds.

Border collies are amazing dogs. Probably one of the smartest breeds. But I wouldn't have one of them as a pet in the city personally. They just seem to be home on farms to me.

And I don't know if just small sample size or whatever but in my experience border collies become attached to one person more than say a lab. This might be ok with you if he will mostly be your dog but for a family dog this is sometimes not ideal.

And grooming..labs shed but with their short hair are much lower maintenance than a collie with the long hair.

Enjoy whichever dog you get!!!
I've noticed the attachment thing with our Jack Russells too .Maybe it is a trait in these genius breeds like Border Collies and Jacks - any poodle owners care to chime in (another very smart breed)? They both love people to death (love everyone they meet), but as far as attachment goes, our one little guy (the one in my photo) is by far more attached to me, while the other one is more attached to my husband. They seem wired to form a very close attachment to one person (although they do love people in general).
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
611 posts
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British Columbia
1C5 wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:19 am
Listen,
whichever breed you choose, you'll fall in love with him/her and will probably adapt to your dog's needs (if you are a good dog owner). I assume you will be as you care enough to research breeds.
While I agree you'll fall in love with whatever dog you get, I disagree that most people will be able to meet the demands of a Border Collie just because they have one. Especially if you have children and do not live on a farm.

Tons of people get them that have never spent time around the breed or even dogs in general and have no idea what they're getting into. All the research in the world isn't going to help when you realize in practice that hour or more of time you thought you could spend daily one on one dwindles to nothing when you have children, you find it's cold or wet or too hot outside, or you have other engagements you would rather pursue than a dog that needs a second (or third...) hour of off leash running after dinner.

They are a frequently rehomed breed, and are also a breed that develops neurotic behaviors due to boredom (and some just have it anyway) and thus end up being surrendered to shelters with a lot of issues.

If someone is only working on a hypothetical time commitment it isn't good enough -- like was mentioned previously you may luck out and get a calmer dog but you could get the other end of the spectrum as well and must be prepared for that. A dog is a commitment for its life of upwards of 15+ years.

Rather, since you'll fall in love with whatever breed or mutt you end up with, why not get one that doesn't come with a high likelihood of needing an hour or more of running daily plus a job to do around the house and that rather is recommended as a first time dog as well as a dog good with children (a Border Collie is neither).
Newbie
Oct 25, 2012
21 posts
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I will concur with the other posters in saying that a Border Collie is most likely a terrible choice for a neophyte dog owner. However, I recently adopted a dog (Akita mix) that is recommended for experienced dog owners only and it's going very well. I think that if you're willing to do the research on proper training, don't have a problem exercising the dog a lot, and are realistic as to what to expect from that particular dog breed (e.g. barking, nipping etc.), it can work. I would like to say that your life would be so much easier if you adopted a Boston Terrier, for example (I'm saying this from personal experience).

I want to compliment you on having your priorities straight. So many people base their decisions primarily on a dog's looks only and not on health or temperament. For example, the current popularity of French Bulldogs is disturbing. They have the loveliest personalities, but dogs like these (i.e. brachycephalic) have so many health issues and short lifespans even when they come from responsible breeders.
[OP]
Penalty Box
Nov 18, 2014
647 posts
517 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Just placed a deposit on a border collie and will be expecting it in December! After chatting with the breeder who's been doing it for over 20 years, there is actually a lot of misinformation stated here earlier. One of the biggest misconception is the need for hours and hours of physical exercise that this breed requires. Yes you do need to bring them out for walks and physical exercise, but it's even more important to simulate them with mental exercise through games and training. Border collies are great family pets, although there will be a difficult period during teething where they will likely nip at your children. Regardless, this is something we will expect and work through as a family!
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
611 posts
208 upvotes
British Columbia
... Good luck then. I don't believe what I have stated is misinformation however. A Border Collie may be more sedate but they also have the potential to need hours of exercise. They are a working/herding breed designed through selective breeding to be outdoors all day helping on a farm, you are not going to train away their herding and nipping. It isn't something to "work through". The dog will need off leash running, not a walk to and from school with some occasional trips to a park with your children.

Of course mental stimulation is important as well, but you can't negate one with the other. You need both mental stimulation and exercise. I have various chew toys like elk antlers and Kongs. I have also taught my dog scent detection -- just recently I taught her to detect truffles. She picked it up immediately. It is a good game to play around the house too.

I have seen first-hand what a bored Border Collie can do (and how neurotic and shy a Border Collie can be) and know people that have worked as fosters for Border Collies. I see many Border Collies at the dog park as well and every single one of them is driven. One can run around a large hedge with their owners standing on either side of it for hours back and forth, several others are obsessed with fetching and will do that for hours with extreme focus, another goes for a few mile bike ride, another needs to go to the park a few times daily for running or they get into trouble, another is 12 and still needs as much exercise as a younger dog and is extremely high energy. I actually know a few older Border Collies; they have as much energy as ever.
Last edited by Karala on Mar 23rd, 2017 11:10 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Dec 27, 2009
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Well, the breeder made a sale...
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Apr 25, 2011
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British Columbia
Chickinvic wrote:
Mar 23rd, 2017 11:16 am
Well, the breeder made a sale...
Did they ever. Guess OP heard what they wanted to hear...

I hope they're prepared for daily jogs/bike rides/dog park trips along with a seriously intense dog that needs a job to do.

I got an Aussie because they are generally known to be much less intense and have a better off switch -- I don't know if I could handle the intensity of a Border Collie. My Aussie I would say is moderate on the scale of "high energy" but still needs off leash time of at least 30 minutes daily. If only given that minimum she'll need much more time on other days and may even with an hour+ of time decide to get into things she shouldn't. A Border Collie is not likely to require any less activity than an Aussie.

If you are not prepared for that then please don't get a Border Collie.

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