Pets

Need dog breed recommendations

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 26th, 2017 8:18 pm
Jr. Member
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Jan 23, 2012
140 posts
40 upvotes
Ilderton, ON
I don't see anything in your self-description that would point to a border collie as a good fit. It sounds like you have young kids, so be realistic about how much time you really can continue to devote to this dog.
If the breeder is any good, the first thing they should do is try to talk you out of the breed. If they didn't grill you about the type of home you will provide to this very demanding breed, I would keep looking. A decent breeder will gladly return your deposit rather than have to take the dog back because it doesn't work out. They always want to make sure their puppies find the best home the first time. http://www.bcrescuenc.org/newwant-bc.htm
Before you pick a breeder, you should at least talk to more than one. I would call one of the breeders on this list just to chat. I've never met a reputable breeder who won't talk your ear off about their breed, highlighting both the good and bad traits. http://canadianbordercollies.org/market ... -trainers/
Since you don't get your dog until December, you could also attend a dog show and talk to breeders there.
You've asked for advice, and then chosen to ignore it. Please, for the sake of the dog, and your own sanity, make sure you are making the best choice.
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Apr 7, 2012
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rkanwar109 wrote:
Mar 9th, 2017 12:45 pm
I think we've decided on a border collie due the the fact that everywhere I've been reading says they're great family pets with minimal health issues. Am i missing anything?

I've also found a potential breeder (http://www.bordacollie.com/). For those that are experienced in thsis area, does it pass the sniff test of being a credible breeder and not a puppy mill? I definitely do not want to support puppy mills in any way.
Theyre hearders. And verrry busy dogs!!!!
They require a lot of mental and physical stimulation.
They nip small children to get them in line ...
def not a small child breed let alone a low maintenance breed.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
608 posts
207 upvotes
British Columbia
I suppose I should also mention the time of year you are planning on a dog as well... I would suggest aiming for a dog in spring or summer, even if it ends up being a year from now.

It is easier to socialize them in warmer weather when more people are out and about. The first few months are critical for socialization and a Border Collie will need quadruple the amount of effort than something like a Lab.
Border Collies have been bred for generations in a very specific and restricted environment for a very specific task and, as a breed, are relative new-comers to life as pets. Some cope very well and others struggle. It is our duty to try to understand these beautiful, clever creatures and to help them to cope.

Anyone who has owned Border Collies will be aware that they are generally cautious dogs. Without intensive and sensitive socialisation as puppies they are often wary of people, intolerant of unfamiliar dogs and anxious about anything new or changing. Even with intensive socialisation some retain these characteristics. Border Collies are prone to being affected by a single bad experience and have poor "bounce back" when something goes wrong for them.
... also, it is much easier on you and the dog to housebreak them in warmer weather. You could be housebreaking at 6+ months old.
Sr. Member
Nov 20, 2008
702 posts
77 upvotes
I think OP started thread already knowing he was going to get a Border Collie. And was maybe just looking for reassurance that it was a good choice.

Then a few people who actually have had BCs said probably not the best choice for his current lifestyle/stage.

Instead of listening he goes to breeder anyway and breeder says they are perfect dog for your situation which many of us who have had BCs don't agree with.

Then he says there is lots of misinformation given by people in this thread. People who have had years of experience with BCs while OP has has none.

I've read through the thread again and see no misinformation. Just because it's not what OP wanted to hear doesn't mean it's misinformation.

OP, we are all just trying to help. BCs are amazing dogs. Enjoy him!
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Dec 27, 2009
3044 posts
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The only people who don't stand to gain financially from you buying a Border Collie have advised you it might not be the best pick for you based on your lifestyle/needs. The only person who stands to gain from you buying a Border Collie told you we were all wrong...
[OP]
Penalty Box
Nov 18, 2014
649 posts
511 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Chickinvic wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 11:47 am
The only people who don't stand to gain financially from you buying a Border Collie have advised you it might not be the best pick for you based on your lifestyle/needs. The only person who stands to gain from you buying a Border Collie told you we were all wrong...
Breeders who are legit don't do it for the money. I'm sure even if i didn't purchase it, she would have no issues selling it to other people.
[OP]
Penalty Box
Nov 18, 2014
649 posts
511 upvotes
Toronto, ON
1C5 wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 8:42 am
I think OP started thread already knowing he was going to get a Border Collie. And was maybe just looking for reassurance that it was a good choice.

Then a few people who actually have had BCs said probably not the best choice for his current lifestyle/stage.

Instead of listening he goes to breeder anyway and breeder says they are perfect dog for your situation which many of us who have had BCs don't agree with.

Then he says there is lots of misinformation given by people in this thread. People who have had years of experience with BCs while OP has has none.

I've read through the thread again and see no misinformation. Just because it's not what OP wanted to hear doesn't mean it's misinformation.

OP, we are all just trying to help. BCs are amazing dogs. Enjoy him!
I actually started with wanted a golden retreiver/lab.
[OP]
Penalty Box
Nov 18, 2014
649 posts
511 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Karala wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 12:38 am
I suppose I should also mention the time of year you are planning on a dog as well... I would suggest aiming for a dog in spring or summer, even if it ends up being a year from now.

It is easier to socialize them in warmer weather when more people are out and about. The first few months are critical for socialization and a Border Collie will need quadruple the amount of effort than something like a Lab.



... also, it is much easier on you and the dog to housebreak them in warmer weather. You could be housebreaking at 6+ months old.
I did ask them about the best time to have a puppy and was told there wasn't really a bad time. You can still bring border collies out in the winter, but just have to watch out for the salt on the roads. My thinking of having them in the winter is better because by the time spring/summer rolls around, the puppy should have had most of the vaccines and shots so they will be ready for socializing.
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Dec 27, 2009
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rkanwar109 wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 12:07 pm
I actually started with wanted a golden retreiver/lab.
I love Border Collies, but I am very partial to highly intelligent/high energy dogs (I have two Jack Russells). Just to give you an example, my Jack Russells will regularly go on 10km runs with me. I'm tired, but they could go again:) If they go without proper energy outlet, then they start to make their own "fun" or "games" and that tends to be not in ways that you would want as a homeowner. They really are wonderful dogs, funny little clowns, but if not properly channelled their intelligence and energy can become a nightmare.
[OP]
Penalty Box
Nov 18, 2014
649 posts
511 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Chickinvic wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 12:11 pm
I love Border Collies, but I am very partial to highly intelligent/high energy dogs (I have two Jack Russells). Just to give you an example, my Jack Russells will regularly go on 10km runs with me. I'm tired, but they could go again:) If they go without proper energy outlet, then they start to make their own "fun" or "games" and that tends to be not in ways that you would want as a homeowner. They really are wonderful dogs, funny little clowns, but if not properly channelled their intelligence and energy can become a nightmare.
10KM runs? That is a great thing to hear as I run a lot and I'm actually planning on training for an ironman. My impression was that you shouldn't bring dogs for runs that long because it could be bad for their hips and elbows (which is why i ultimately steered away from labs/retrievers) while BC have less hip/elbow issues. Definitely won't have an issue with physical activity then.
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rkanwar109 wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 12:14 pm
10KM runs? That is a great thing to hear as I run a lot and I'm actually planning on training for an ironman. My impression was that you shouldn't bring dogs for runs that long because it could be bad for their hips and elbows (which is why i ultimately steered away from labs/retrievers) while BC have less hip/elbow issues. Definitely won't have an issue with physical activity then.
It probably depends on the breed? My Jacks have no issues at all with all the running. I've been doing it with my one little guy (in my profile picture) since he was a few months old (the picture of him is actually from about that age). I started him off small, and we increased and increased it. He has done up to 1/2 marathon distances with me (the limits are mine - not his lol). We didn't get our other dog until he was a few years old (he's a rescue), and he is the best runner you could imagine. I don't think it would be possible to tire him out if I tried. Both are very healthy and no issues (6 and 7 years old now).

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Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
608 posts
207 upvotes
British Columbia
rkanwar109 wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 12:09 pm
I did ask them about the best time to have a puppy and was told there wasn't really a bad time. You can still bring border collies out in the winter, but just have to watch out for the salt on the roads. My thinking of having them in the winter is better because by the time spring/summer rolls around, the puppy should have had most of the vaccines and shots so they will be ready for socializing.
Of course any time will do but spring and summer are ideal times for good reason. Sounds more and more like the breeder just wanted to make a sale.

You absolutely cannot wait until the spring to start getting them out to meet new people. Daily. Multipule times a day if you want a well adjusted dog.

I place a higher importance on socialization as it is something that can have lifelong repercussions than concerns over vaccinations. The viruses aren't that common, anyway.

What they learn as a puppy in the first few months is extremely formative. It is a small and extremely important window of time. As long as a puppy has had first shots I would bring them out and about around vaccinated dogs and other puppies (there are even puppy socialization and training classes for young ones) and make sure to of course get all vaaccinations in a timely manner; even fully vaccinated not all vaccinations are 100% effective. Or even 50% in the case of Bordetella.

The whole point of vaccinations is that the puppy is born with an immunity from the mother and over time it wears off. You booster 3 times to try and catch when it has worn off, which is different for every dog.

Best Time Of The Year To Get A Puppy
One of numerous articles. Google is your friend, since you don't seem to like what we have to say...
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Jul 11, 2010
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Toronto
Old English Sheepdogs are great dogs. Out of the 4 different breeds that we have had, she was my favorite.
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dougboswell wrote:
Mar 24th, 2017 8:35 pm
Old English Sheepdogs are great dogs. Out of the 4 different breeds that we have had, she was my favorite.
I had a terrifying experience with one as a child. It followed me around the park and kept mounting me and I didn't know what was going on. The thing was bigger than me at that time and I thought I was being attacked lol.
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Nov 9, 2002
479 posts
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For our first dog we got a Brittany, and she was so amazing....very very gentle, dead easy to train, smart etc. Do require min. 1hr. exercise a day....but man....they are incredible dogs.

We did not want to roll the dice, and got a second Brittany when the first was about 11, he is now 3.5 and another incredible dog.

Please look into the breed.

Our first Brittany passed not that long ago at over 14, and our current one is 3.5......trying another breed this time, picking her up on Sunday, a Vizsla.

With any dog, you will have to put in your time and energy, but well worth it !!!

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