Art and Photography

Need help in purchasing filters for camera for upcoming African Safari

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 13th, 2017 5:55 pm
[OP]
Member
Sep 28, 2010
291 posts
57 upvotes
Surrey

Need help in purchasing filters for camera for upcoming African Safari

Hi everyone

I'll be travelling to Africa at the end of next month, and i'd like to purchase a couple of filters, for protection, and creativity. I have a Canon 70d, and will be taking 3 lenses with me.
70-300, 10-18, 18-135.....I consider myself still a noob when it comes to photography, and am still learning the photography triangle....any help would be appreciated it...Also any other recommendations on equipment to take?
31 replies
Deal Addict
Nov 21, 2008
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North Vancouver, BC
Just get a clear lens filter is you're looking for some protection.
Deal Guru
Dec 10, 2004
11271 posts
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Kanata
I doubt they all have the same filter size, so to save on buying filters, you could buy the largest diameter filter required, then use step down rings.

I would definitely consider an ND and CPL. UV for protection if you're worried about that.
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Aug 4, 2008
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Toronto
goofball wrote:
Jun 21st, 2017 8:50 am
I doubt they all have the same filter size, so to save on buying filters, you could buy the largest diameter filter required, then use step down rings.

I would definitely consider an ND and CPL. UV for protection if you're worried about that.
If it's the Safari trekking, you want an ND filters in a 3 and 6 stop and a circular polarizer.

Check out Breakthrough Photography, they have some really nice filters if you have lenses with the same filter size.
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Jun 15, 2012
9204 posts
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Southern Ontario
-Use hoods for improved contrast and protection

-Travel tripod and ND for those dreamy landscapes with blurry clouds; tripod and no ND at night, long exposure Milky Way shots (optional, light paint close greenery/vehicles with a flashlight)

-A good circular CPL for nicer skies, reduce reflections.

-A Giottos rocket blower to get rid of all that dust

-Search "camera bean bag" on Amazon.

-A speedlite for daylight fill or evening people portraits (bounce it in the evening)

-Something like a chest Digital Holster or Thule Holster
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purplekush604 wrote:
Jun 20th, 2017 9:31 pm
Hi everyone

I'll be travelling to Africa at the end of next month, and i'd like to purchase a couple of filters, for protection, and creativity. I have a Canon 70d, and will be taking 3 lenses with me.
70-300, 10-18, 18-135.....I consider myself still a noob when it comes to photography, and am still learning the photography triangle....any help would be appreciated it...Also any other recommendations on equipment to take?
IMHO, I'd take 2 cameras and 2 lenses( eg 70-300 and 18-135). It is often very dusty in Africa and changing lenses in dust clouds introduces a lot of dust which you may find difficult to get rid off, while traveling.

I don't use filters aside from UV filters to protect my front elements.

You can sure try an ND filter,but I never had issues capturing blue skies in Africa and many other countries which are not as polluted.

You should spend a few hours watching some youtube videos on how to use your camera. That will help you so much more than any filters or additional gear. You just mentioned being a noob, and camera settings should be your priority and not trying out different filters.

Recommended gear to take:
1. extra batteries
2. portable charger to charge phone,tablet,etc. You may arrive to a camp and there could be no power there. Look into Anker as they make great chargers: Anker on Amazon
3. photo backup device:
a. it can be a tablet with enough memory
b. My android phone has a 128gb memory card. I bought microusb -usb adapter and now use it to back up pictures directly to my phone.
4. lens cleaning wipes
5. motion sickness pills.
6. head lamp( dollar stores have them)

Note how I am not including a tripod... :) Out of all my safari trips, I never needed one or wished I had one. A lot of animals are somewhat close and 70-300 will be your most used lens. Typically on a safari you are shooting either through the roof or a window. Both provide plenty of support. Unless you are alone in your van/jeep, there's just no place to put a tripod.
A monopod may be of some help...but not really.
One time at a safari we saw a lioness hunting and while I was taking pictures of her running, another photographer beside me was adjusting his monopod extension. About 10 seconds later it was all over. Out of 5 people in our safari jeep, he was the only one with a tripod and the only one who missed it.


Also, depending on how and where your safari will take place, consider your luggage selection wisely.
1. Some domestic flights may have luggage size and weight restrictions. You don't want to end up paying $5/kg
2. Some rural roads and areas would be extremely uncomfortable with a wheeled suitcases and you may consider taking something you can carry on your shoulders(eg. large backpack)
3. Some safari operators have luggage size restrictions as well. Especially if they have to carry your gear or your safari vehicle is small.
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Jr. Member
Nov 15, 2011
117 posts
42 upvotes
NORTH YORK
where are you going in africa for your safari? it will dictate some of the gear you should bring because of the vehicle. ie. if you're going to tanzania then you will be poking out of the top of a covered suv and you should bring a bean bag but if you're going to south africa the suvs are open and a regular tripod will be useless.. some might have a oh sh!t bar to grab onto in the front of your seat which you could mount a camera mount..
also some of the private reserves will require you to take a small prop plane which will severely limit how much stuff to bring due to weight. there is no extra overages they just leave it in storage at their airport hangar.

we went to south africa and we brought 2 dslr bodies and 18-200, 70-300 and a 35mm. the thought was that 1 camera would use the 35 and the other the zoom for those situations where the animals were right beside the car. but in reality we both had the zooms on when out on a drive and if anything got close we either whip out the iphone or goPro.

also brought a ipad to transfer at the end of day/ extra battery, lens brush/charger/extra memory card.. brought a tripod but never used it on safari.
[OP]
Member
Sep 28, 2010
291 posts
57 upvotes
Surrey
rebel_rfd wrote:
Jun 21st, 2017 12:20 pm
If it's the Safari trekking, you want an ND filters in a 3 and 6 stop and a circular polarizer.

Check out Breakthrough Photography, they have some really nice filters if you have lenses with the same filter size.
Breakthrough's filters look very nice, also very pricy. im taking 3 67mm lenses with me, and am hoping to get a uv filter for each, + one ND and one CPL filter.
[OP]
Member
Sep 28, 2010
291 posts
57 upvotes
Surrey
AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 22nd, 2017 9:54 am
-Use hoods for improved contrast and protection

-Travel tripod and ND for those dreamy landscapes with blurry clouds; tripod and no ND at night, long exposure Milky Way shots (optional, light paint close greenery/vehicles with a flashlight)

-A good circular CPL for nicer skies, reduce reflections.

-A Giottos rocket blower to get rid of all that dust

-Search "camera bean bag" on Amazon.

-A speedlite for daylight fill or evening people portraits (bounce it in the evening)

-Something like a chest Digital Holster or Thule Holster
Im looking at the hoya filters but their seem to be so many. I was looking at the the following ( https://www.amazon.ca/Hoya-Digital-Filt ... =hoya+67mm ) but not sure if they are good quality ones. I dont want to cheap out, and end up with sub par photos. I read i should get multi coat filters...any thoughts? Will get the blower for sure!!
[OP]
Member
Sep 28, 2010
291 posts
57 upvotes
Surrey
demi2004 wrote:
Jun 22nd, 2017 2:26 pm
IMHO, I'd take 2 cameras and 2 lenses( eg 70-300 and 18-135). It is often very dusty in Africa and changing lenses in dust clouds introduces a lot of dust which you may find difficult to get rid off, while traveling.

I don't use filters aside from UV filters to protect my front elements.

You can sure try an ND filter,but I never had issues capturing blue skies in Africa and many other countries which are not as polluted.

You should spend a few hours watching some youtube videos on how to use your camera. That will help you so much more than any filters or additional gear. You just mentioned being a noob, and camera settings should be your priority and not trying out different filters.

Recommended gear to take:
1. extra batteries
2. portable charger to charge phone,tablet,etc. You may arrive to a camp and there could be no power there. Look into Anker as they make great chargers: Anker on Amazon
3. photo backup device:
a. it can be a tablet with enough memory
b. My android phone has a 128gb memory card. I bought microusb -usb adapter and now use it to back up pictures directly to my phone.
4. lens cleaning wipes
5. motion sickness pills.
6. head lamp( dollar stores have them)

Note how I am not including a tripod... :) Out of all my safari trips, I never needed one or wished I had one. A lot of animals are somewhat close and 70-300 will be your most used lens. Typically on a safari you are shooting either through the roof or a window. Both provide plenty of support. Unless you are alone in your van/jeep, there's just no place to put a tripod.
A monopod may be of some help...but not really.
One time at a safari we saw a lioness hunting and while I was taking pictures of her running, another photographer beside me was adjusting his monopod extension. About 10 seconds later it was all over. Out of 5 people in our safari jeep, he was the only one with a tripod and the only one who missed it.


Also, depending on how and where your safari will take place, consider your luggage selection wisely.
1. Some domestic flights may have luggage size and weight restrictions. You don't want to end up paying $5/kg
2. Some rural roads and areas would be extremely uncomfortable with a wheeled suitcases and you may consider taking something you can carry on your shoulders(eg. large backpack)
3. Some safari operators have luggage size restrictions as well. Especially if they have to carry your gear or your safari vehicle is small.
Thanks for the reply!

I wish i could afford a second camera, but im purchasing a sony fdr x3000 action camera as well, everything is adding up to be quite a bit!!
What is youre opinion on this kit?

https://www.amazon.ca/Hoya-Digital-Filt ... =hoya+67mm
[OP]
Member
Sep 28, 2010
291 posts
57 upvotes
Surrey
g5spark wrote:
Jun 23rd, 2017 11:43 am
where are you going in africa for your safari? it will dictate some of the gear you should bring because of the vehicle. ie. if you're going to tanzania then you will be poking out of the top of a covered suv and you should bring a bean bag but if you're going to south africa the suvs are open and a regular tripod will be useless.. some might have a oh sh!t bar to grab onto in the front of your seat which you could mount a camera mount..
also some of the private reserves will require you to take a small prop plane which will severely limit how much stuff to bring due to weight. there is no extra overages they just leave it in storage at their airport hangar.

we went to south africa and we brought 2 dslr bodies and 18-200, 70-300 and a 35mm. the thought was that 1 camera would use the 35 and the other the zoom for those situations where the animals were right beside the car. but in reality we both had the zooms on when out on a drive and if anything got close we either whip out the iphone or goPro.

also brought a ipad to transfer at the end of day/ extra battery, lens brush/charger/extra memory card.. brought a tripod but never used it on safari.
Will be going to Tanzania and Kenya
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Aug 4, 2008
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Toronto
purplekush604 wrote:
Jun 26th, 2017 12:08 am
Will be going to Tanzania and Kenya
Spend the extra amount and get Breakthrough Photography filters.

I used them in a recent trip to Florida and they were much better with virtually no color casting.

You can also stack a 3 and 6 stop from Breakthrough, just won't be able to go down to 16 mm as you'll get vignetting. However, a 10 stop is pretty rarely used.
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Jun 15, 2012
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purplekush604 wrote:
Jun 26th, 2017 12:06 am
Im looking at the hoya filters but their seem to be so many. I was looking at the the following ( https://www.amazon.ca/Hoya-Digital-Filt ... =hoya+67mm ) but not sure if they are good quality ones. I dont want to cheap out, and end up with sub par photos. I read i should get multi coat filters...any thoughts? Will get the blower for sure!!
I think demi2004 makes some good points because he's been there a few times. It's harder to play with filters if you haven't mastered your camera.

Also check what he said about weight limits. How dedicated are you? There are times I'll get up before the sun rises, shoot into blue hour in the evening, go out again and do Milky Way shots. If that isn't you and you only plan to take pics during the excursion portion, you don’t need a tripod or ND’s, I apologize, sometimes I think "what I would like like to do” in special locales. Depending on your schedule, you might not have time to use those tools.

I don't use protective filters anymore, I mainly use hoods. If you still want protection over the front element, buy a well regarded 67mm filter x3 (see which brands/model other RFDers recommend). Skip the CPL and it'll make life easier where you're not always looking at the sun's direction to employ it. For all you know, there's nothing in that 90° direction that's interesting. If you don't have skin tones to worry about, a trick in Lightroom is to lower the blue Luminance and your sky will become more vibrant blue. Also paint with a brush, use radial or the grad tool, lower highlights to bring back clouds and sky detail. The worst thing that could happen is you get variations in the sky you need to fix later, unless you practice lots before going:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=how+to+u ... #kpvalbx=1
[OP]
Member
Sep 28, 2010
291 posts
57 upvotes
Surrey
rebel_rfd wrote:
Jun 26th, 2017 9:23 am
Spend the extra amount and get Breakthrough Photography filters.

I used them in a recent trip to Florida and they were much better with virtually no color casting.

You can also stack a 3 and 6 stop from Breakthrough, just won't be able to go down to 16 mm as you'll get vignetting. However, a 10 stop is pretty rarely used.
I want a uv filter for each lens for sure, i checked the site and they only have x2 and x4 version, with a pretty significant price increase between the two. I would love to take some landscape, sunset, sunfall photos along the way, and photos of the the entire country generally. If i do get a nd or a cpl filter, id most likely only get one of each....
AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 26th, 2017 7:01 pm
I think demi2004 makes some good points because he's been there a few times. It's harder to play with filters if you haven't mastered your camera.

Also check what he said about weight limits. How dedicated are you? There are times I'll get up before the sun rises, shoot into blue hour in the evening, go out again and do Milky Way shots. If that isn't you and you only plan to take pics during the excursion portion, you don’t need a tripod or ND’s, I apologize, sometimes I think "what I would like like to do” in special locales. Depending on your schedule, you might not have time to use those tools.

I don't use protective filters anymore, I mainly use hoods. If you still want protection over the front element, buy a well regarded 67mm filter x3 (see which brands/model other RFDers recommend). Skip the CPL and it'll make life easier where you're not always looking at the sun's direction to employ it. For all you know, there's nothing in that 90° direction that's interesting. If you don't have skin tones to worry about, a trick in Lightroom is to lower the blue Luminance and your sky will become more vibrant blue. Also paint with a brush, use radial or the grad tool, lower highlights to bring back clouds and sky detail. The worst thing that could happen is you get variations in the sky you need to fix later, unless you practice lots before going:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=how+to+u ... #kpvalbx=1
I havent mastered my camera, but i understand aperature, iso, and shutter speed, somewhat......as someone who is still learning, and hopefully will continue to learn...

I'm definitely not as dedicated as you, but for normal week long vacations i can easly take 1500 photos...i wont be taking photos just of the safari, landscapes, sunsets,sunfall, and the whole country pretty much..

I wont be taking a tripod, but i think either a nd or cpl filter may make for some nice shots in Africa, and i dont mind investing in a good pair of filters...wish breakthough had sets like hoya..

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