Health & Wellness

Need suggestion for UV santizing wand?

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 30th, 2020 10:39 am
[OP]
Sr. Member
Feb 27, 2011
928 posts
101 upvotes
Toronto

Need suggestion for UV santizing wand?

I am looking for a portable sized and battery operated UV sanitizing wand. Must be at least UV-C band. Any suggestion for a good brand? There are so many knockoff and fake (non UV-C) wands on Amazon or eBay. I can't tell which ones are good.

Help!
4 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 19, 2010
1533 posts
301 upvotes
Vancouver
shyhermit wrote: I am looking for a portable sized and battery operated UV sanitizing wand. Must be at least UV-C band. Any suggestion for a good brand? There are so many knockoff and fake (non UV-C) wands on Amazon or eBay. I can't tell which ones are good.

Help!
These are pretty much useless for sanitation.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Feb 27, 2011
928 posts
101 upvotes
Toronto
Can you explain a bit about this further? For example, I found out all of the Verilux UV wands have been sold out and that people are price gouging on the wands on eBay. I also found out that many of the off-brand UV wands are fake or underpowered. So may be it is useless because there are too many fake products?
sandy_beach wrote: These are pretty much useless for sanitation.
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Aug 19, 2010
1533 posts
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Vancouver
For UV sanitizing, the surface has to be exposed to uv for 15 minutes to have any sort of sanitizing effect. It’s not like you can just wave a wand over an area and it’s instantly sanitized.. it doesn’t work like that.
Deal Addict
Aug 17, 2008
1024 posts
433 upvotes
Two questions you need to answer.
(1) do UV-C wands work to disinfect and kill specifically virus, and
(2) Just as important, are they safe to use?


Answer to (1), while industrial and hospital grade UV-C devices used to sterlize surgical equipment work, consumer UV-C wands are not as effective. They may work depending on the surface (e.g. porous, or hard), but not assured to work. Clearly do not work well on porous or uneven surfaces:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2855944/
https://www.wkyc.com/article/tech/scien ... bdd1479efc

Answer to (2) IMO is clear. I would not use a UV-C wand. While they have safety features (and the manufactures claim they are safe), UV-C destroys the DNA (or RNA) code. What happens if you accidentally expose your skin or eyes to it?

From article below; "UV-C is really nasty stuff -- you shouldn't be exposed to it. It can take hours to get sunburn from UV-B, but with UV-C it takes seconds. If your eyes are exposed... you know the gritty feeling you get if you look at the sun? It's like that times 10"
You are better off cleaning with soap and detergent.
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2020 ... h-uv-light

Doctor in the wkyc link (2nd link) said something similar. First he says these consumer products are not that great. and second he says "safety issues outweigh worries about germs because UV lights can be dangerous".

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