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Negotiating Offers

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  • May 25th, 2017 9:56 am
[OP]
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Nov 29, 2005
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Markham

Negotiating Offers

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone has experience with negotiating an employment offer? If so, did you succeed or did you not? salary, benefits and vacation time off.

Please share your valuable experience

Thank you
20 replies
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Jul 12, 2003
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First of all, who is in a better position?
You want/need the job more or They need you more? (rather you have any particular skill that it is hard for them to hiring someone else other than you)
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jojochiu wrote:
May 11th, 2017 1:40 pm
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone has experience with negotiating an employment offer? If so, did you succeed or did you not? salary, benefits and vacation time off.

Please share your valuable experience

Thank you
The first step is to know your value. What were you making before, for both wages and benefits. What are equivalent positions paying? Glassdoor has some information. You also need to know how this job compares to your past jobs, so you know if it's worth more to an organization than what you were doing before.

Second, know your valueS. Do you value higher income over more holidays? Does working from home have benefits to you? Are you willing to compromise in one area to get more in another?

Third, try to get them to throw out the first number. As in most negotiations, the first one to throw out a number usually loses. If you throw out a number of say, $100k, the odds that you'll get more than that are slim to none. They'll throw out a number less than that, and you'll work to a compromise. If they start with an offer of $100k, you can throw out $110 and negotiate down.

C
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Dec 28, 2010
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I don't think there is a 'losing' or ' winning'. I put out a low number at one time and the lady said: "Well, we'll offer more than that". If they want you you'll get what ever comes out of the negotiation. Start with what you know you want.
Actions speak louder than words
[OP]
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Nov 29, 2005
329 posts
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Markham
CNeufeld wrote:
May 11th, 2017 3:28 pm
The first step is to know your value. What were you making before, for both wages and benefits. What are equivalent positions paying? Glassdoor has some information. You also need to know how this job compares to your past jobs, so you know if it's worth more to an organization than what you were doing before.

Second, know your valueS. Do you value higher income over more holidays? Does working from home have benefits to you? Are you willing to compromise in one area to get more in another?

Third, try to get them to throw out the first number. As in most negotiations, the first one to throw out a number usually loses. If you throw out a number of say, $100k, the odds that you'll get more than that are slim to none. They'll throw out a number less than that, and you'll work to a compromise. If they start with an offer of $100k, you can throw out $110 and negotiate down.

C
Thanks for your input! I think I want the job a bit more in this scenario because of the company and I really want to leave my current position. I am more eager...I have a fulll time job now but im not happy...hence I am looking to leave...
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Be upfront with what you are at now, and what it takes to get you to leave, and keep in mind the real reasons why you want to make a change. Money is usually one of the last reasons for most people to make a job move. You move for better work, better opportunities, and an organization that is successful. Money will eventually follow.

If you ask for $$$$ be ready to answer why you want $$$$ instead of their offer of $$$.
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bhrm wrote:
May 11th, 2017 4:21 pm
Be upfront with what you are at now, and what it takes to get you to leave, and keep in mind the real reasons why you want to make a change. Money is usually one of the last reasons for most people to make a job move. You move for better work, better opportunities, and an organization that is successful. Money will eventually follow.
Good formal answer but in reality, will one move to another job that "seems" better opportunity, "seems" better environment, but let say 20-25% pay cut?
At the end of all, compensation is still a big part of the factor in this game, depending which way the compensation is falling in. (vacation pay, WFH, flexibility, etc)
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MP3_SKY wrote:
May 11th, 2017 4:29 pm
Good formal answer but in reality, will one move to another job that "seems" better opportunity, "seems" better environment, but let say 20-25% pay cut?
At the end of all, compensation is still a big part of the factor in this game, depending which way the compensation is falling in. (vacation pay, WFH, flexibility, etc)
We all have a standard of living to up keep (RFD standards $100k minimum kthxbye!) but at the same time it's also important to keep the future in mind.

I personally made a move because I did the same thing for almost 10 years, and really really really wanted something different so I can continue to be successful in my career for the future.

20% pay cut? I would ask or find out how long it would take or what it would take to get back up there and see if it's worth it.
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bhrm wrote:
May 11th, 2017 5:14 pm

20% pay cut? I would ask or find out how long it would take or what it would take to get back up there and see if it's worth it.
Right, how long it takes for me to go back to where I was before but even your employer wont answer this question and no body can.
If some is young and no family/financial obligation, it would be good to take a risk. For other that is the bread winner at home, the risk to probably high for them.

I also made a big move after 8 years at the same job and couldn't go anywhere because they all offer me 10-20% less from the job I was.
I ended up went to do something totally different (compensation wise) and settled down well.
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jojochiu wrote:
May 11th, 2017 3:43 pm
Thanks for your input! I think I want the job a bit more in this scenario because of the company and I really want to leave my current position. I am more eager...I have a fulll time job now but im not happy...hence I am looking to leave...
I dont think companies would revoke the offer just because you asked for a little more. So the worst that can happen is they'll say no, and you'd still get whats on the table. So knowing that, there's nothing to lose to ask.

You may need the job more, but you dont have to show that. Focus and re-iterate what you bring to the table, be reasonable. Sometimes HR is capped with what $$ they can offer, so if its past that, then it might be a good idea to ask an open question - "so is there something else that you could offer instead of the basic". maybe they'll increase the vacation day or something. in any case, dont be too stubborn but assertive. so that if you have to go back to what they offered, its not embarrassing.
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You negotiate after you get the offer. Now if during the process, they specifically state a hard number, and you accept, you can't negotiate the salary afterwards. Unless you're higher up, and have some kind of generally niche skill, it's harder to negotiate any big differences. Generally, alot of the budget is made where the hiring manager won't bother going back up for more. The higher up person you deal with, the more you can negotiate. I.e. President trying to woo away a VP from another company.
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VESTEGAARD wrote:
May 11th, 2017 3:33 pm
I don't think there is a 'losing' or ' winning'. I put out a low number at one time and the lady said: "Well, we'll offer more than that". If they want you you'll get what ever comes out of the negotiation. Start with what you know you want.
That's rare, and not at all typical. Normally they think "Hallelujah, we can pay this guy less".
[OP]
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Markham
at1212b wrote:
May 12th, 2017 11:29 am
You negotiate after you get the offer. Now if during the process, they specifically state a hard number, and you accept, you can't negotiate the salary afterwards. Unless you're higher up, and have some kind of generally niche skill, it's harder to negotiate any big differences. Generally, alot of the budget is made where the hiring manager won't bother going back up for more. The higher up person you deal with, the more you can negotiate. I.e. President trying to woo away a VP from another company.
Well we talked about the offer verbally and that is what was talked about mainly. They wanted to see my input before writing up an official offer. I have no issues with the benefits and vacation and everything else provided. HR indicated she will get back to me tomorrow at noon in regards to this as she can't make a decision. For sure the opportunities are better off in comparison to what I am doing now.
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jojochiu wrote:
May 15th, 2017 8:34 pm
Well we talked about the offer verbally and that is what was talked about mainly. They wanted to see my input before writing up an official offer. I have no issues with the benefits and vacation and everything else provided. HR indicated she will get back to me tomorrow at noon in regards to this as she can't make a decision. For sure the opportunities are better off in comparison to what I am doing now.
Good luck and keep us posted how it goes.
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[OP]
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MP3_SKY wrote:
May 17th, 2017 5:20 pm
Good luck and keep us posted how it goes.
So she didn't end up calling me on tuesday as originally discussed but she called me first thing yesterday morning. Apologized that she has personal situation and wasn't able to get back to me on tuesday. She wasn't in the office but still managed to call me and left me a message about me getting an offer by the end of day yesterday. She probably got her assistant to work on it but I did not receive anything yesterday.

I'm wondering if I should email or call her as a reminder....what would you guys recommend?

Thanks

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