Art and Photography

New camera - need advice

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 10th, 2017 8:45 pm
[OP]
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Oct 5, 2016
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hdom wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 4:51 am
Did you even read the article ?? Lol
Yes, I did - however, from this
Bridge cameras are typically aimed at professionals and prosumers who have an SLR but want something lighter that they can carry with them at all times, yet which still have the manual controls associated with the higher-end cameras.
I am not entirely sure still what it is? It just states that it's lighter.

So hdom, if you were to choose a camera, would you pick a bridge or mirrorless?
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Jones10 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 8:45 am
Yes, I did - however, from this I am not entirely sure still what it is? It just states that it's lighter.
common attributes of a bridge camera.
- bigger than a point and shoot but smaller than a DSLR with an equivalent lens.
- cannot change lenses
- has a higher quality wide range zoom lens (wide angle all the way to high telephoto...usually a 10X range or better). On some bridge cameras like the RX10, it has a fast lens of similar quality to a good DSLR lens.
- sensor is smaller than mirrorless camera. Most of them have 1" sensors just like the best point and shoots.
- has more controls similar to a DSLR, so good for people that like to adjust things manually.

Basically, it's for people that want a versatile all in one camera that has a good lens. That's why it's suggested to be a good travel camera. Usually when you travel you don't want to change lenses.
[OP]
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Oct 5, 2016
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warpdrive wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 9:22 am
common attributes of a bridge camera.
- bigger than a point and shoot but smaller than a DSLR with an equivalent lens.
- cannot change lenses
- has a higher quality wide range zoom lens (wide angle all the way to high telephoto...usually a 10X range or better). On some bridge cameras like the RX10, it has a fast lens of similar quality to a good DSLR lens.
- sensor is smaller than mirrorless camera. Most of them have 1" sensors just like the best point and shoots.
- has more controls similar to a DSLR, so good for people that like to adjust things manually.

Basically, it's for people that want a versatile all in one camera that has a good lens. That's why it's suggested to be a good travel camera. Usually when you travel you don't want to change lenses.
Thank you! This answer is by far the best I've received.
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Jones10 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 9:28 am
Thank you! This answer is by far the best I've received.
No problem. My answer is applicable/correct for the newer bridge cameras like the RX10 or Panasonic FZ1000. Some of the cheaper bridge cameras may lack some of the attributes that I've stated (for example, sensor is smaller than 1" or lens is of lower quality), but in general, expect a wide range lens, a size somewhere in between a point and shoot and DSLR, and all-in-one versatility.
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Jones10 wrote:
Jul 26th, 2017 8:45 am
Hey all,
I'm in the market for a new camera, wanting to upgrade from a 10-year-old digital that I got as a present.
I've been talking to quite a few dealers and most of them told me to go for the Canon EOS 80D. I've been researching a bit online and it seems to have many great reviews. My question is, however, have any of you been using it/know somebody who owns one or alike?

I wish to gain as much knowledge as I can before purchasing something that expensive!
Thank you for all your inputs.
-!- Now looking at the Sony A6000 based on feedback from the forum -!-
Canon SL2 is smaller, lighter and a lot cheaper. it has the same IQ / sensor as 80D, DPAF, flip touch screen, wifi / bluetooth. the only downside I can see is the ridiculous ancient 9-point AF.
there are many reasons to buy the 80D though. micro focus adjustment, 7 fps, 100% coverage pentaprism viewfinder, longer battery life. if none of these matters to you, get the SL2!
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If you get a bridge, make sure it's a 1" sensor.
They are probably the best compromise for an amateur who doesn't want to switch lenses, and/or portable vacation camera if you want long distance sacrificing some image quality.

OP, I shoot paid work with Canon full frame but I personally would not buy Canon mirrorless, they use dedicated mirrorless lenses and it's a small Canon-M kijiji market. If you ever decide to sell, there will be a very small pool of interested buyers. Either you'll have a hard time, or you'll take a big loss.

After film, my first digital camera was a bridge camera, after a while I was not satisfied with the quality and began buying DSLR's. Today's bridge cameras are excellent but if you don't need the long optical zoom, you can get an equally good 1" point and shoot like an RX100, or ZS100 that has a bit more reach. Unless I'm on a safari, I'm typically shooting landscapes and portraits on vacation and don't need to shoot long.

The end result is up to you... composition, using light effectively, the moment, and editing contribute to great shots over comparable gear.
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I would stick to a mirrorless since coming from a DSLR, it is already lighter and more compact for me.

As a former Bridge camera owner, the thing I don't like about them is, it is just too close to a P&S. The RX10, as an example, even has the same sensor and internal as the RX100, Sony mainly just added a long zoom lens onto it and a much higher price tag. It was really designed too as a "bridging" camera for people that wanted to have more manual control or zoom from their P&S but is kinda intimidated by a DSLR/Mirrorless.

Honestly, since you had a DSLR already, at this point you should focus on getting a good mirrorless camera, bridge would be too far of a step down. Unless, you really want the lightest body possible and a mega long zoom, at the expense of PQ & AF (compared to a mirrorless/DSLR).

Under your original request to have a camera for kids indoors, a bridge camera wouldn't do as well and may be worst than a P&S due the slower nature of a long lens.

Just stick to upper end mirrorless model from Sony/Fuji/Panasonic/Olympics and you will be fine.
Jones10 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 8:45 am
... So hdom, if you were to choose a camera, would you pick a bridge or mirrorless?
Last edited by hdom on Aug 10th, 2017 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
The Devil made me buy it - RFD. :twisted:
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One thing to remember, if you delve into telephoto lenses, you lose most of the mirrorless weight/size advantage.
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traderjay wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 2:36 pm
One thing to remember, if you delve into telephoto lenses, you lose most of the mirrorless weight/size advantage.
+1

But you will get a bit of a workout to keep those arms and core toned.....

My DLSR + 50-500 = about 8lbs; add a 70-200 f/2.8 and 12-24 lens, a few accessories like the battery charger, extra batteries, loupe & electrostatic brush, a monopod, and the weight of the bag itself and you are lifting a 15lbs + camera bag before you know it.

.

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