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Next time someone says you can cut down a tree

  • Last Updated:
  • May 9th, 2017 10:16 pm
Sr. Member
Feb 18, 2010
590 posts
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Greely
licenced wrote:
Apr 10th, 2017 10:52 pm
Well those are two opinions many do not agree with you on including me.

As was mentioned by someone else, this is done for the benefit of the greater population.
I think I've planted at least 16 trees since I moved into my present house in 2009. The city of Ottawa provided 3, but one died and I replaced it. I have 5 Autumn Blaze-type hybrid maples, 1 Sugar maple, 1 Red maple, 2 Norwegian maples, 2 apple trees, 1 hybrid Oak, 2 Japanese lilacs, and I bought two more last year but I can't remember what they are (possibly a Linden?). OTOH, I've had to cut down 4 dead ash trees, and the Red maple the City provided. I usually wait until Canadian Tire has them on clearance in early August...

Moar trees, please!
[OP]
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Jul 3, 2011
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Thornhill
old sparks wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 8:26 am
I think I've planted at least 16 trees since I moved into my present house in 2009. The city of Ottawa provided 3, but one died and I replaced it. I have 5 Autumn Blaze-type hybrid maples, 1 Sugar maple, 1 Red maple, 2 Norwegian maples, 2 apple trees, 1 hybrid Oak, 2 Japanese lilacs, and I bought two more last year but I can't remember what they are (possibly a Linden?). OTOH, I've had to cut down 4 dead ash trees, and the Red maple the City provided. I usually wait until Canadian Tire has them on clearance in early August...

Moar trees, please!
Your property sounds very pretty and relaxing.
Deal Fanatic
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Nov 19, 2004
7041 posts
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Cambridge, ON
The argument that it is your property doesn't apply when you live in a city. Cities need to keep mature trees and encourage more tree plantings. The by law a exist for everyone and are there for a reason.

If there is a legitimate reason for needing to cut down a mature tree, then there is a process to go through to get the permit to do so.

I only wish the trees on our property were more mature.
Newbie
Aug 25, 2006
84 posts
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Toronto
engineered wrote:
Apr 10th, 2017 10:26 pm
Are you honestly suggesting you would prefer to live in a city with no trees?
Not what I'm saying. My point is if you want a tree plant a tree... own the tree, care for the tree, appreciate it. I'm also saying if you don't want a tree you should be free to remove it *without threat of financial/legal penalty!*. I don't buy this share resource argument. Our tax dollars are a shared resource and many of those shared dollars already pay for many "shared resource" trees on boulevards, parks, etc. My Property is NOT a shared resourced.

I live in a 15 yer old suburb of Markham. Practically no one plants trees (like <3% of my entire neighborhood). I planted three which are decent size now and enjoy the shade, privacy, and look. I do not however feel it is appropriate for me to stick my nose in my neighbors business should they want to remove a tree from their property (if they had any). The beauty of tree's are in the eye of the beholder. Some see aesthetic appeal while many see undesirable wildlife habitat, huge insurance risk, pollen, and constant maintenance and cleanup.

At most this lady should be penalized by replacing the trees she cut down with new trees *if the trees she cut down were on city property*.
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Nov 19, 2004
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Cambridge, ON
dbracer wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:21 am
My Property is NOT a shared resourced.
Might not be a shared resource, but you still have to follow the by-laws. There are many things you cannot just go ahead and do to your property without first gaining a permit.
dbracer wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:21 am
I live in a 15 yer old suburb of Markham. Practically no one plants trees (like <3% of my entire neighborhood).
Which is exactly why they don't want people cutting down existing trees. Cities need trees to combat urban heat effects and air pollution.
dbracer wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:21 am
At most this lady should be penalized by replacing the trees she cut down with new trees *if the trees she cut down were on city property*.
Many major cities have a similar by-law. Like everything, you break the law, you risk the penalty. Not sure why this should be any different. It was determined that it would take 18 new trees to replace the one she cut down.
Penalty Box
Oct 13, 2016
144 posts
7 upvotes
The poor neighbor just jealous about the lady having money to renovate and build big house.

Some local neighbors are extremely stupid and jealous, last time I need to cut down a tree in order to do lot severence, my shitty neighbor even called 10 other neighbors to protest. I immediately called police.
And I have already got the approval from municipal government, as it is an ash tree. And those shameful neighbors claimed that I cut down a maple tree.....luckily the trunk was not transported away.

Those neighbors needs to respect other cultures. Trees are bad in my cultures, you cannot intrude others culture believing by maximizing your happiness.

If we cut all the greenbelt in Ontario, we will have enough supply to inhibit the current housing bubble, rather than trying to steal foreigners money into tax.

dbracer wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:21 am
Not what I'm saying. My point is if you want a tree plant a tree... own the tree, care for the tree, appreciate it. I'm also saying if you don't want a tree you should be free to remove it *without threat of financial/legal penalty!*. I don't buy this share resource argument. Our tax dollars are a shared resource and many of those shared dollars already pay for many "shared resource" trees on boulevards, parks, etc. My Property is NOT a shared resourced.

I live in a 15 yer old suburb of Markham. Practically no one plants trees (like <3% of my entire neighborhood). I planted three which are decent size now and enjoy the shade, privacy, and look. I do not however feel it is appropriate for me to stick my nose in my neighbors business should they want to remove a tree from their property (if they had any). The beauty of tree's are in the eye of the beholder. Some see aesthetic appeal while many see undesirable wildlife habitat, huge insurance risk, pollen, and constant maintenance and cleanup.

At most this lady should be penalized by replacing the trees she cut down with new trees *if the trees she cut down were on city property*.
Deal Expert
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Jun 9, 2003
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Markham, ON
question....are home owners allowed to trim a tree? cause I saw someone trim it down to reduce the height...
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Feb 5, 2009
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Newmarket
uwbuchanan wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:40 am

Those neighbors needs to respect other cultures. Trees are bad in my cultures, you cannot intrude others culture believing by maximizing your happiness.

If we cut all the greenbelt in Ontario, we will have enough supply to inhibit the current housing bubble, rather than trying to steal foreigners money into tax.
While imo people should do with their own trees as they wish, what you said is for me very strange. I am curious to know in what cultures trees are bad? In this case, assuming it's the culture and not some silly superstition, I would suggest updating the culture to 21st century standards.
Our greenbelts are a bit of a joke, they are over fertilized and chemically damaged lands for the most part used for agriculture, nothing green about it, however I wouldn't put millions of houses there, if we want it green maybe the trees should go there.
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Dec 5, 2009
3667 posts
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uwbuchanan wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:40 am
The poor neighbor just jealous about the lady having money to renovate and build big house.

Some local neighbors are extremely stupid and jealous, last time I need to cut down a tree in order to do lot severence, my shitty neighbor even called 10 other neighbors to protest. I immediately called police.
And I have already got the approval from municipal government, as it is an ash tree. And those shameful neighbors claimed that I cut down a maple tree.....luckily the trunk was not transported away.

Those neighbors needs to respect other cultures. Trees are bad in my cultures, you cannot intrude others culture believing by maximizing your happiness.

If we cut all the greenbelt in Ontario, we will have enough supply to inhibit the current housing bubble, rather than trying to steal foreigners money into tax.
Sorry but You live here now so you need to embrace or at least accept Canadian values and cultures. Our "greenness" , whether it's grass or trees, whatever, is part of what makes living here special vs some dessert or paved over concrete barren place where you come from. We need more trees not less.

I'm also going to assume you are trolling with all those comments about cutting down the green belt.
[OP]
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Jul 3, 2011
3874 posts
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Thornhill
uwbuchanan wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:40 am
Those neighbors needs to respect other cultures. Trees are bad in my cultures, you cannot intrude others culture believing by maximizing your happiness.
I'd suggest you need to respect all the other cultures, people and laws that were here or are inherent to this country.

I for one wouldn't leave one country whose ways I prefer to live in another whose ways I object to.

You're whining, it's not about you. Find an island and do as you wish with it.
Last edited by licenced on Apr 11th, 2017 11:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 3, 2011
3874 posts
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Thornhill
thelefteyeguy wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:50 am
question....are home owners allowed to trim a tree? cause I saw someone trim it down to reduce the height...
Yes, trim and prune as long as they don't injure the tree. In Markham though you can call the city to trim the boulevard trees.
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Feb 8, 2014
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licenced wrote:
Apr 10th, 2017 3:50 pm
remember this thread.
I had to cut down a dying tree but i did it legally, i called the city, asked if a permit was needed, they said no but to consult an arborist who would inform me if its a protected tree which it was not. It was dying and part of it fell and could have killed someone or damaged a house so it had to come down.

I like trees but $1500 to cut it down was not a fun experience
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
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Feb 11, 2007
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GTA
dbracer wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 10:21 am
Not what I'm saying. My point is if you want a tree plant a tree... own the tree, care for the tree, appreciate it. I'm also saying if you don't want a tree you should be free to remove it *without threat of financial/legal penalty!*. I don't buy this share resource argument. Our tax dollars are a shared resource and many of those shared dollars already pay for many "shared resource" trees on boulevards, parks, etc. My Property is NOT a shared resourced.

I live in a 15 yer old suburb of Markham. Practically no one plants trees (like <3% of my entire neighborhood). I planted three which are decent size now and enjoy the shade, privacy, and look. I do not however feel it is appropriate for me to stick my nose in my neighbors business should they want to remove a tree from their property (if they had any). The beauty of tree's are in the eye of the beholder. Some see aesthetic appeal while many see undesirable wildlife habitat, huge insurance risk, pollen, and constant maintenance and cleanup.

At most this lady should be penalized by replacing the trees she cut down with new trees *if the trees she cut down were on city property*.
Again, you agreed to certain rules/bylaws when you bought your house. Just like you can have a pool without a fence around it, or build a 10 storey tower on "your property".
I used to live in Markham and I agree it's very bland and ugly without a lot of mature trees (some areas are better). When I moved recently I specifically chose an older neighbourhood with mature trees for the many benefits it provides. Privacy, noise cancellation, fresher air, cooler temps/shade.

There is also zero insurance premium to trees, as if there was your insurance would ask if you had trees on the lot. If an old tree is dangerous, you would have no issues trimming it or cutting it down.
Quentin5 wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 11:19 am
I had to cut down a dying tree but i did it legally, i called the city, asked if a permit was needed, they said no but to consult an arborist who would inform me if its a protected tree which it was not. It was dying and part of it fell and could have killed someone or damaged a house so it had to come down.
I like trees but $1500 to cut it down was not a fun experience
Yea, it can be expensive if you can't do it yourself, but if you shop around you can find good deals.
I had Davey Tree cut down my large crab apple tree for $490+tax. It was over 40cm in diameter and at least 30ft tall. They also accidentally did the stump grinding for free (quoted at $260). I think there was a $100 fee to the city for the arborist/permit.
I planted a nice new Tulip tree myself (dug the hole and nursery dropped it off in the hole). I think that was about $300-350.
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Feb 8, 2014
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engineered wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 11:40 am
Again, you agreed to certain rules/bylaws when you bought your house. Just like you can have a pool without a fence around it, or build a 10 storey tower on "your property".
I used to live in Markham and I agree it's very bland and ugly without a lot of mature trees (some areas are better). When I moved recently I specifically chose an older neighbourhood with mature trees for the many benefits it provides. Privacy, noise cancellation, fresher air, cooler temps/shade.

There is also zero insurance premium to trees, as if there was your insurance would ask if you had trees on the lot. If an old tree is dangerous, you would have no issues trimming it or cutting it down.


Yea, it can be expensive if you can't do it yourself, but if you shop around you can find good deals.
I had Davey Tree cut down my large crab apple tree for $490+tax. It was over 40cm in diameter and at least 30ft tall. They also accidentally did the stump grinding for free (quoted at $260). I think there was a $100 fee to the city for the arborist/permit.
I planted a nice new Tulip tree myself (dug the hole and nursery dropped it off in the hole). I think that was about $300-350.
My tree was much larger, one of the guys i got a quote from said he only does small/medium trees which mine wasn't
Though i do wonder if prices vary city to city.
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
Newbie
Feb 4, 2010
99 posts
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Homerhomer wrote:
Apr 10th, 2017 5:29 pm
Good points for the most part, except the trees also present safety hazards in populated neighbourhoods, and damage the properties by falling branches, expanding roots and so on. We have no issue with an average of 1000 square feet of living space per person, running lights all the time, warming cars in the winter, and on and on and on and on, yet a neighbour cuts a tree on her own property and we are all up in the arms while millions of hectares of trees are chopped every year. Just saying ;-)
Agreed - people are so quick to judge. Shortly after I got possession of my house, I had to get 5 trees taken down (didn't want to) but 2 were diseased and when (not if) they were to fall, it would be on my roof and driveway. Others were dead and would have fallen on my neighbours shed. The article doesn't state why she took down the trees hopefully it was for a legitimate reason, but even then. I doubt people would start "going nuts" and chopping down trees (it's expensive).
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