Health & Wellness

No progress in WEIGHT LOSS

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  • Jan 16th, 2019 7:48 pm
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Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
2028 posts
523 upvotes
Woodbridge
Just finished typing this and I feel like this was a disorganized mess, but hopefully, someone finds it helpful. I'm NOT a nutritionist or a dietician or a doctor or anything like that. I've just done a lot of reading on this stuff and have worked hard to apply it to my own life.

Almost everybody knows that if your body absorbs more energy (calories) than it burns, you will gain weight. If your body absorbs fewer calories than it burns, you will lose weight. If the numbers are the same you will maintain weight.

Your body burns energy in four ways and they add up to represent your total energy expenditure (TEE) - 1, your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of energy required for basic bodily functions. You'd burn this if you were in a coma just to keep your body temperature up and your lungs, brain, and heart going. For most people, BMR is about two-thirds(ish) of their total calories burned. 2, your non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is the number of calories your body burns being generally active throughout the day. This can include things like walking the dog, getting the mail, walking upstairs, going to the mall etc. In most people, this is the second-largest part of TEE. 3, exercise activity thermogenesis (EAT) is the number of calories burned through formal exercise. 4, the thermal effect of food (TEF) is the amount of energy your body needs to break food down into parts that it can use.

If and only if the total number of calories your body absorbs (which is NOT the same as what you eat, by the way) is less than the total number of calories your body burns in this TEE equation, you will lose weight. So all you need to do is either reduce the number of calories you eat, and/or increase your BMR, and/or increase your NEAT, and/or increase your EAT, and/or increase your TEF and you will be on your way to creating the deficiency that is necessary to burn fat.

Seems simple enough, but there are some important points to consider. You may have heard that not all calories are created equal. The type of food you eat has a direct effect on TEF and an indirect effect on BMR (e.g., not enough protein could lead to a reduction in lean muscle which could lead to a reduction in BMR). The amount of energy that your body needs to break down different types of macronutrients is also an important factor. Protein, for example, does not exist in the body in the same form that we eat it. Our bodies need to go through a process to break up those protein molecules into pieces that it can use. That takes energy. Fats and simple carbohydrates, on the other hand, are easily used by the body and the body does not need to burn much energy breaking those down. I'm not a scientist so I haven't looked at studies but I've found several sources online and it seems that for every 100 calories of fat that we eat our body burns 3-5 calories to break it down,for every 100 calories of carbs we consume our body burns 5-20 calories to break it down (this had the most variability among sources, from 5-10 to 5-25), and for every 100 calories of protein that we eat our body burns about 15-25 calories to break it down.

So, using all of the above here's a hypothetical extreme example. I eat 2000 calories and I meticulously choose lean proteins and complex carbohydrates and maximize the thermal effect of food. Because of my choices, my body uses 400 calories (20%) of energy In order to process and use the energy stored in those macronutrients. The next day, I eat 2000 calories worth of sweet and tasty buttercream. Tons of fat and simple sugars. Because of my choices, my body uses 100 calories (5%) of energy in order to process and use the energy stored in those macronutrients. Same 2000 calories, significantly different expenditure due to TEF. This is a pretty silly example, but it shows that it's possible to increase your total energy expenditure by doing nothing but changing the types of food you eat. Increase protein and complex carbs. Reduce fat and simple sugars.

Beyond that, NEAT is probably the easiest for most people to increase. You don't need to drag yourself to the gym every day to "exercise." Look for opportunities to add small bursts of extra movement throughout the day. Walk to Tim's instead of drive. Take the stairs. Vacuum the house. If possible, break up your workday and go for a 5-minute walk every hour or so. Anything that gets you moving.

The only way that any overweight person will ever shed the fat is by fixing their nutrition. That's the simple truth. Exercise activity thermogenesis is simply not a big enough piece of your total energy expenditure to make up for a poor diet. And forget the word diet, by the way. A diet implies restriction and deprivation and temporary. Something you need to "cheat" from because you hate doing and you plan on stopping once you achieve whatever you want to achieve. Nutrition is a lifestyle change that requires you to form new habits that you enjoy and change the way you think about food long term. Look for simple changes at first. Imagine you had a secret pill that reduced half of the calories in everything you ate. What you would eat in that magical world? Cook it. Eat it. Then find some small changes that you can make. Love eggs and bacon in the morning? Great! Try 3 eggs instead of 4. Or 2 eggs and some egg whites. Or 1 piece of pork bacon and 1 piece of turkey bacon. Make small changes. Huge changes are unsistainable and that's why most people fail on their diets. You simply won't be motivated to continue eating shit you hate by making sudden changes to deprive yourself.

One last point - for me, I found that intermittent fasting helped me keep my calories in in check. I developed a habit of making my 24-oz coffee in the morning and bringing only that with me to work. Sunday meal prep has become a fun habit as well and I prepare my chicken or fish and salads or veggies (cauliflower rice is so tasty) for the entire week and have them in the fridge ready to go when I get home. I also use MyFitnessPal to track my calories and I set a limit of 1950. It's almost become a game to see how many calories I can "save." I usually get to the evening with about 900 or 1000 calories remaining for the day and I'm nevery hungry enough to eat that much, so i'll have some sunflower seeds and popcorn and maybe a yogurt and end up below my target. You need to find what motivates you. - Also, low calorie foods that take a while to eat are a nice trick for me. Sunflower seeds in particular. 80g (in shell) of sunflower seeds is something like 170 calories and I can snack on them for hours. Get your nuts in shells because it takes longer to eat!
Member
Mar 6, 2015
225 posts
510 upvotes
New Brunswick
jvnanu wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 8:27 am
Just finished typing this and I feel like this was a disorganized mess, but hopefully, someone finds it helpful. I'm NOT a nutritionist or a dietician or a doctor or anything like that. I've just done a lot of reading on this stuff and have worked hard to apply it to my own life.

Almost everybody knows that if your body absorbs more energy (calories) than it burns, you will gain weight. If your body absorbs fewer calories than it burns, you will lose weight. If the numbers are the same you will maintain weight.

Your body burns energy in four ways and they add up to represent your total energy expenditure (TEE) - 1, your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of energy required for basic bodily functions. You'd burn this if you were in a coma just to keep your body temperature up and your lungs, brain, and heart going. For most people, BMR is about two-thirds(ish) of their total calories burned. 2, your non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is the number of calories your body burns being generally active throughout the day. This can include things like walking the dog, getting the mail, walking upstairs, going to the mall etc. In most people, this is the second-largest part of TEE. 3, exercise activity thermogenesis (EAT) is the number of calories burned through formal exercise. 4, the thermal effect of food (TEF) is the amount of energy your body needs to break food down into parts that it can use.

If and only if the total number of calories your body absorbs (which is NOT the same as what you eat, by the way) is less than the total number of calories your body burns in this TEE equation, you will lose weight. So all you need to do is either reduce the number of calories you eat, and/or increase your BMR, and/or increase your NEAT, and/or increase your EAT, and/or increase your TEF and you will be on your way to creating the deficiency that is necessary to burn fat.

Seems simple enough, but there are some important points to consider. You may have heard that not all calories are created equal. The type of food you eat has a direct effect on TEF and an indirect effect on BMR (e.g., not enough protein could lead to a reduction in lean muscle which could lead to a reduction in BMR). The amount of energy that your body needs to break down different types of macronutrients is also an important factor. Protein, for example, does not exist in the body in the same form that we eat it. Our bodies need to go through a process to break up those protein molecules into pieces that it can use. That takes energy. Fats and simple carbohydrates, on the other hand, are easily used by the body and the body does not need to burn much energy breaking those down. I'm not a scientist so I haven't looked at studies but I've found several sources online and it seems that for every 100 calories of fat that we eat our body burns 3-5 calories to break it down,for every 100 calories of carbs we consume our body burns 5-20 calories to break it down (this had the most variability among sources, from 5-10 to 5-25), and for every 100 calories of protein that we eat our body burns about 15-25 calories to break it down.

So, using all of the above here's a hypothetical extreme example. I eat 2000 calories and I meticulously choose lean proteins and complex carbohydrates and maximize the thermal effect of food. Because of my choices, my body uses 400 calories (20%) of energy In order to process and use the energy stored in those macronutrients. The next day, I eat 2000 calories worth of sweet and tasty buttercream. Tons of fat and simple sugars. Because of my choices, my body uses 100 calories (5%) of energy in order to process and use the energy stored in those macronutrients. Same 2000 calories, significantly different expenditure due to TEF. This is a pretty silly example, but it shows that it's possible to increase your total energy expenditure by doing nothing but changing the types of food you eat. Increase protein and complex carbs. Reduce fat and simple sugars.

Beyond that, NEAT is probably the easiest for most people to increase. You don't need to drag yourself to the gym every day to "exercise." Look for opportunities to add small bursts of extra movement throughout the day. Walk to Tim's instead of drive. Take the stairs. Vacuum the house. If possible, break up your workday and go for a 5-minute walk every hour or so. Anything that gets you moving.

The only way that any overweight person will ever shed the fat is by fixing their nutrition. That's the simple truth. Exercise activity thermogenesis is simply not a big enough piece of your total energy expenditure to make up for a poor diet. And forget the word diet, by the way. A diet implies restriction and deprivation and temporary. Something you need to "cheat" from because you hate doing and you plan on stopping once you achieve whatever you want to achieve. Nutrition is a lifestyle change that requires you to form new habits that you enjoy and change the way you think about food long term. Look for simple changes at first. Imagine you had a secret pill that reduced half of the calories in everything you ate. What you would eat in that magical world? Cook it. Eat it. Then find some small changes that you can make. Love eggs and bacon in the morning? Great! Try 3 eggs instead of 4. Or 2 eggs and some egg whites. Or 1 piece of pork bacon and 1 piece of turkey bacon. Make small changes. Huge changes are unsistainable and that's why most people fail on their diets. You simply won't be motivated to continue eating shit you hate by making sudden changes to deprive yourself.

One last point - for me, I found that intermittent fasting helped me keep my calories in in check. I developed a habit of making my 24-oz coffee in the morning and bringing only that with me to work. Sunday meal prep has become a fun habit as well and I prepare my chicken or fish and salads or veggies (cauliflower rice is so tasty) for the entire week and have them in the fridge ready to go when I get home. I also use MyFitnessPal to track my calories and I set a limit of 1950. It's almost become a game to see how many calories I can "save." I usually get to the evening with about 900 or 1000 calories remaining for the day and I'm nevery hungry enough to eat that much, so i'll have some sunflower seeds and popcorn and maybe a yogurt and end up below my target. You need to find what motivates you. - Also, low calorie foods that take a while to eat are a nice trick for me. Sunflower seeds in particular. 80g (in shell) of sunflower seeds is something like 170 calories and I can snack on them for hours. Get your nuts in shells because it takes longer to eat!
Excellent post overall! I had been trying to find a way to phrase the highlighted part as best I could, but you did a much better job there than I ever would.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 29, 2011
3453 posts
1499 upvotes
Westmount (Montreal)
Some scientific information:

Calories restriction are still the best reliable way to lose weight.

Method using insulin peak are still unproved and simplistic is you don't restrict the calories.

Good article on that here with an analysis of different diet: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ge ... Health.pdf

If you want to go the commercial diet way, there's been a great review (meta-analysis) of the most efficient program available. The three best are in order: Jenny Craig, Nutrysystem and finally Weight Watcher.

You can find the complete review here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl ... 688662.pdf

Good luck OP
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
2028 posts
523 upvotes
Woodbridge
bunmin wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 11:27 am
Excellent post overall! I had been trying to find a way to phrase the highlighted part as best I could, but you did a much better job there than I ever would.
Thanks! Wish I could take the credit but I'm pretty much paraphrasing Jeff Cavaliere (Athlean-X on YouTube) and everything he says in his weight loss videos.
Deal Addict
Aug 4, 2008
4175 posts
1095 upvotes
Toronto
Try The Whole 30 approach.

It's pricey, not a diet, but rather teaches you to redefine your relationship with food, especially if you eat a lot of sugar or processed foods.
Deal Addict
Dec 26, 2007
3036 posts
277 upvotes
Search online for a TDEE calculator (it’s not exact, but a good guideline), take 500 calories a day off your TDEE and that’s the number of calories you should be eating to lose a pound a week (or adjust up or down depending on how fast you want to lose, just be safe and realistic in your goals).

Download an app like My Fitness Pal or Lose It to track your calories. If you’ve only lost a pound with diet and exercise, you’re either drastically underestimating the calories you’re eating or drastically overestimating the calories you’re burning through exercise (or both). Until you get an idea of how many calories are actually in the foods you’re eating, it’s helpful to track everything you put in your mouth, from the oil you use to sauté your vegetables to the handful of nuts you eat at a party, everything counts, and the little things add up. I was pretty shocked when I did this, and it enabled me to make some easy changes to reduce high calorie items and to stop mindlessly eating. It might sound excessive, but if you track everything you eat religiously for a week I guarantee you’ll see why you’ve only lost a pound.

Get a kitchen scale and a set of measuring cups/spoons. Do you really know what 100g of chicken looks like? Are you just eyeballing a cup of rice or a tablespoon of mayonnaise? I spent less than $20 on these, great investment as I found I was often way off on my estimates of what I was putting on my plate. Guessing and being a bit over each time adds up. Again, it might seem excessive, but it will show you where you’ve been going wrong. Your estimation skills will get better with practice, but when starting out you need to see what your portions actually look like and make sure you’re actually eating the amount you think you are. And don’t ever snack out of bags or boxes, you can easily blow most of your daily calories sitting mindlessly in front of the TV. If you want a snack, measure it out.

You lose weight when you burn more calories than you consume, people have different views on the best way to do it, but that’s the basic fact. If you think Keto will work for you, great. Paleo? Sure. Intermittent fasting? Why not? Pick whatever method sounds the most doable for you, as long as you eat less than you burn, you’ll lose weight with it.

Personally, I do intermittent fasting and eat anything as long as it fits into my daily calorie goal. I couldn’t see myself eating long term without ever having bread or pasta or desserts again, so low carb methods didn’t appeal to me. Sure, it’s possible for me to spend all my calories on junky foods, but then I’m constantly hungry and feel like crap, so I find I just naturally started gravitating to foods with more protein and fibre, but I like the idea that I don’t have to deprive myself of any type of food entirely. It’s worked for me, but everyone’s different. Whatever floats your boat, as long as you stick within your calories.

Lastly, make sure as you start losing that you’re periodically recalculating your TDEE, smaller bodies need less calories, so as you progress, your daily calorie allotment will decrease. If you find yourself plateauing, you may still be eating for the heavier body you had a few weeks ago. That’s been the hardest part for me. If only the last 10 pounds were as easy as the first 10 pounds. But, by the time you get there you’ll have found a method that works for you, and it will have become a habit, which is really half the battle. Good luck!
Member
Jan 1, 2017
346 posts
206 upvotes
JamesK7400 wrote:
Jan 6th, 2019 1:19 pm
Hi. I exercise regularly and I have been on a diet for 2 months. during this time I lost 1 lbs. I wonder what I am doing wrong. Do you have any special advice for me? 5'10 fts and 308 lbs
What’s your definition of exercising regularly? What kind of exercise? How long per session and how often? What’s your daily lifestyle? Do you sit at a desk all day? Do you walk around?

You should also use an app to keep detail log of how many calories you are eating per day. You should probably drop to below 2000 calories per day to see results.
Newbie
May 9, 2018
88 posts
18 upvotes
This post right here is the reason there ought to be a 'like' button! I appreciate your post with the layman explanation that even a person off the street can understand.

Octavius wrote:
Jan 6th, 2019 10:35 pm
Exercise is a great way to get in shape and gain muscle, but going to the gym isn't necessarily going to result in weight loss.

If you want to lose weight, easily 80% of the issue is basic food intake / calories. Consume less calories than you burn, and your body will start turning to its fat reserves for the energy it needs to keep it going.

The average male with a sedentary lifestyle burns about 2000 - 2200 calories a day simply just by existing. If you go to the gym every day and run a half hour on the treadmill and burn another 400 calories, then that initial "burn calories to stay alive" number goes up accordingly. So long as you consistently consume LESS calories than that number, you will eventually lose weight. How quickly you'll lose weight will depend largely on your deficit each day/week.

So if your body needs 2100 calories to just exist and you're consuming 1400 calories a day, and you're not going to the gym at all, that leaves you with a 700 calorie deficit. There's 3500 calories in one pound, Assuming you keep this up, by the end of the week, you should be down about 1 1/4 lbs, if not a little bit more.

If you're not losing weight, but not gaining any, then you're at maintenance. That means that the number of calories you consume, on average per day over the course of the week, is about the same number of calories your body burns.

As for strategies, there's all sorts of them. Keto Diet, Atkins Diet, Potato Diet, Whatever Diet. The diet is a tool to get you started and to help you see results, but it needs to become a lifestyle change vs something that is temporary. Find out what type of diet works for you and your body and run with it.

Anyway, hope that helps.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 5, 2019
8 posts
2 upvotes
hmm, they are not as bad as you say. I personally watched how supplements positively affected my friend. I use them for 2 days and I'm happy so far, no bad health signs. I have not dropped anything yet, but I am sure that I am on the right way to
Deal Addict
Dec 26, 2007
3036 posts
277 upvotes
JamesK7400 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 1:37 pm
hmm, they are not as bad as you say. I personally watched how supplements positively affected my friend. I use them for 2 days and I'm happy so far, no bad health signs. I have not dropped anything yet, but I am sure that I am on the right way to
Well, you’ve gotten lots of good advice from people in this thread on different ways to lose weight safely and effectively, but clearly you’re not willing to put in any effort and are just looking for a magical solution. At best, these pills will have no effect on your weight loss, at worst you may feel fine until one day you have a stroke or find out you have liver damage. Don’t mess around with unregulated pills. There aren’t any easy short cuts to weight loss, you’ll find that out eventually, I just hope you still have your health when you do.
Jr. Member
Oct 3, 2017
128 posts
79 upvotes
The supplement industry is the largest contributor to US politicians. Guess why? To keeps the status quo is why. No regulation, ability to make claims with no science (ie double blind placebo) no supervision on content and quality control.

OP regular exercise is good for you regardless of whether or not you lose any weight. If you are serious you need to weigh everything you eat, record in a journal everything that goes in your mouth and preferably join a group with others in the same situation as you (weight watchers for instance). Whatever you do don't buy these organizations pre-made food unless you are rich but group therapy works.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
2028 posts
523 upvotes
Woodbridge
Octavius wrote:
Jan 6th, 2019 10:35 pm
The average male with a sedentary lifestyle burns about 2000 - 2200 calories a day simply just by existing. If you go to the gym every day and run a half hour on the treadmill and burn another 400 calories, then that initial "burn calories to stay alive" number goes up accordingly. So long as you consistently consume LESS calories than that number, you will eventually lose weight. How quickly you'll lose weight will depend largely on your deficit each day/week.
Good advice, but just a minor correction - it's not just BMR and exercise. The body also burns calories to break down and absorb the food that you eat (TEF, aka the thermal effect of food) and there are differences in how much energy it takes to break down, for example, 10 calories of protein or 10 calories of fat (protein takes more energy to burn). You're also missing the thing that, for most people, represents the second-largest part of their daily energy expenditure - simply moving around (NEAT, aka non-exercise activity thermogenesis) without formally exercising at the gym (EAT, aka exercise activity thermogenesis). So there are actually four parts of the "energy out" side of the equation - BMR, NEAT, EAT, and TEF. You don't need to take the time to go to the gym and spend 30 minutes on a treadmill to burn 400 extra calories. This is a huge thing that people often overlook. You do no need to go to the gym to burn more calories. Buy 5-pound dumbells from SportCheck and keep them by the couch or on a night table. Move them around while watching TV. Get a soccer ball and kick it around under your desk while working. Have a yoga ball instead of a chair and just bounce. Literally, bounce. Go for a 60-second walk every half hour. Bring the grocery bags from the car to the kitchen one at a time. Anything at all that requires a muscle to move that otherwise would not have moved will burn calories. All of these things add up and don't require the commitment to go to the gym that many people are unable or unwilling to make.
swagwalk wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 11:19 am
This post right here is the reason there ought to be a 'like' button! I appreciate your post with the layman explanation that even a person off the street can understand.
There is. The thumbs up button at the bottom of posts.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
5264 posts
541 upvotes
JamesK7400 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 1:37 pm
hmm, they are not as bad as you say. I personally watched how supplements positively affected my friend. I use them for 2 days and I'm happy so far, no bad health signs. I have not dropped anything yet, but I am sure that I am on the right way to
You're jumping to conclusions here. How did you figure out how the supplements affected your friend? How did you friend control for other factors that may have led to changes?

You will not lose weight unless you sustain a calorie deficit over time, no matter what supplement you take. Why wouldn't you save the money you spent on supps and put it towards a grocery cart full of produce instead? If you're looking to beat obesity and make lasting changes, you need to change your mindset and behaviours.
Member
Mar 4, 2010
450 posts
163 upvotes
Toronto
OP, i dropped 50 pounds several years ago and along with others here are some key things:
1) its all about food. what you consume needs to be less than what you use. others have gone into detail so i wont pile on.
2) meal prep. Probably the single biggest advise i can give you is to do all your meal prep on a sunday night after grocery shopping:
Buy a club pack of boneless skinless chicken breast, bake it in the oven (you can use some salad dressing as marinade, but no cream based)
go buy packages of bell peppers, carrots, cucumber, celery, cherry tomatoes, and baby bhel cheese. cut all those items up and throw them into multiple containers for snacking throughout the week.
buy a big box of no salt nuts (preferrably almonds), either grab snack bags or more containers and a handful at a time portion them out just like about for snacking throughout the week.
lastly, veggies like asparagus, brussel sprouts, mushrooms and avocados. Those will be your go to veggies with whichever protein you choose from (more chicken or lean ground beef, turkey, pork)
if you feel like you need 'carbs' from bread, rice etc. Keep some brown rice around to go with your dinner but make sure you stick with one serving size by measuring it out exactly. If you need bread, there are some interesting flatbreads out there that are high protein breads like carbout or something like that from walmart.
3) cut out ALL types of pop. Doesn't matter if its zero calories or diet. Same thing wtih smoking (if your a smoker). These things mess with your metabolism
4) exercise is good but make sure its something that mixes cardio with resistance training. Doing a 10-30 minute brisk walk when lifting some weights will help you slim down physically but not necessarily make you lose weight. Muscle weighs more than fat so you'll tighten that belt but you won't necessarily see the scale go down.

If you want your pizza, ice cream, etc. Try to resist but cheat only once a week or every other week. If you have to have your pizza, go thin crust, light on the cheese, extra on the sauce and try and stick with veggies and limit meat.

One thing i tried was going vegetarian for a month. What it did was it made me really focus on what i was consuming and pay attention to everything that was on my plate instead of mindless eating.

Theres always more to say but i think this is a lot of things already

Edit: one last thing to add: it also depends on when you eat. for energy sake, avoid eating anything within a few hours of going to bed. Your body wants to rest but will be too busy trying to process a late night meal/snack to actually shut down for the night. If you are always exhausted first thing in the morning, this is most likely why. Try stopping eating after dinner for a week and see how quickly you are up in the morning before your alarm clock even goes off. You'll also probably notice you wont be waking up in the middle of the night sweating or overheated. Imagine your body is a locomotive engine and your about to pull into the station for the night. Would you throw more coal into the fire? no, you want whats already in there to be used up so you can coast into the terminal without blowing the engine apart
Deal Addict
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Nov 24, 2005
2084 posts
802 upvotes
SW Ontario
djfunk wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 10:26 am
OP, i dropped 50 pounds several years ago and along with others here are some key things:
1) its all about food. what you consume needs to be less than what you use
That's ALL there is to it

You don't need to give up pop or sugar or chips or chocolate - you don't need to give up anything - as long as whatever you eat fits into your calorie allotment for the day, you'll lose weight. Heck, you could eat nothing but M&Ms all day and still lose weight as long as it was within your allotment of calories - you might not feel so great though, which is why it's a good idea to meet your nutritional needs for the day before eating the less nutritional foods

I've lost weight as well - 60 lbs - using My Fitness Pal to track my calories - weighing and measuring EVERYTHING - and every night I had my tv snack (choco/chips) because there's no way I would give that up, it just wouldn't be sustainable for me, and you need to do what's sustainable, otherwise you're doomed to fail.

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