Off Topic

North Koreans Give Crystal Meth as Lunar New Year Gifts

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 11th, 2019 1:38 pm
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loserga wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 10:09 pm
I don't see the point in calling people names due their views. I suggest you take your words elsewhere.

My views come from my status as a Chinese Canadian, and a citizen of the Republic of China, a rump state which only survived thanks to the Korean War, and remains a thorn in the PRC's side due to US interests, but on the other hand cannot secure its borders against the PLA without American assistance.

So no, we are not communist apologists. Having fought communists on air, sea, and land for 50 years, and through sheer diplomatic prowess prevented the PRC from seizing recognition as the Chinese government for 20 years after losing the mainland, we do not view them as our betters. On the other hand, we don't just recognize other governments by the differences in the ideology that they espouse (and thus how they treat their citizens), but also by the potential benefits and liabilities from engaging with them as nation states.

We recognize the US as an ally on the basis of its promise to defend Taiwan militarily in the event of a Chinese attack, and take every step diplomatically to ensure that the US remains committed to Taiwan. We also recognize the US as a nation motivated more by its avarice as opposed to benevolence when it comes to managing global affairs, having dealt with them directly or through their corporate agents in one form or the other since achieving nationhood, and having assisted them and its allies militarily in global conflicts over half a century.

American hegemony is built on the complete and utter denial of a nation's ability to determine its own future if it conflicts with US interests. Thus trade sanctions are not just an American maneuver to destroy a nation by attrition, they are also an acknowledgment that the Americans haven't been able to destroy, remove, or influence the local government through any other means in order to further its own agenda. Being the last resort used against an enemy state, trade sanctions continue to be accompanied by other methods of destabilization such as propaganda, bribes, subterfuge, etc.

Radio Free Asia, being heavily influenced by the CIA, does not target Americans or their neighbours, but rather US allies in Asia and their neighbours. Their objective is the creation and reinforcement of divisions between US allies and enemies in the region through the manipulation of facts and rumours. If trade sanctions by the US Department of Commerce are already in place, then propaganda campaigns by Radio Free Asia would have already been in place long before that.

As an aside, Taiwan has its own experiences with American radio propaganda, having hosted the US military's Armed Forces Network Taiwan starting in the late 50s, which was then reorganized into ICRT by American businessmen after the US recognized the PRC.

The second biggest threat against the US in East Asia is thawing relations between North and South Korea. For other governments in the region this is an indication that US presence is weakening. China, drawing on its strengths as both a resource-rich land and a low-cost, high volume manufacturer with a well-developed supply chain, doesn't need to engage in propaganda campaigns in Korea - these strengths alone allow it to become a regional hegemon. The South Korean government, like the ROC, has only ever wanted the US to defend them militarily against their own enemies. If relations improve between North and South, then there's little reason for the South to allow US troops to be stationed there, and the Chinese will naturally extend its economic reach over both nations.

This leads into my final point: China and Korea remain divided because the Americans see one as a potential rival and the other as an inevitable vassal of the former.
Sorry, the point I got was that the big bad US and their propaganda is the only thing allowing these countries to even be countries instead of just more sameness under the steam roller of communism.

Also not like I haven't heard this hypocrisy a million times from first generation immigrants. Someday your children will return home after you've bled canada dry to return former glory to whatever you imagine your birth country to be, we promise.
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nabiul wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 10:31 pm
Sorry, the point I got was that the big bad US and their propaganda is the only thing allowing these countries to even be countries instead of just more sameness under the steam roller of communism.

Also not like I haven't heard this hypocrisy a million times from first generation immigrants. Someday your children will return home after you've bled canada dry to return former glory to whatever you imagine your birth country to be, we promise.
If cherry-picking points is the only thing you're willing to do, then the conversation ends here. Korea's future is inseparable from China's, whether you like it or not. However, a united Korea, communist or democratic, will be able to deal with both China and the US on better terms than they do now. The US government has deemed a united Korea to be a threat to its strategic interest of Chinese containment (just as it believed a united Germany to be a potential Soviet ally after WWII due to its geographical proximity), and thus it will do what it can to keep Korea divided.

We've lived with the threat of a Chinese invasion for 80 years. You've a lot to learn from us about who they are, what motivates them, and what they're trying to achieve.
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loserga wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 10:50 pm
If cherry-picking points is the only thing you're willing to do, then the conversation ends here. Korea's future is inseparable from China's, whether you like it or not. However, a united Korea, communist or democratic, will be able to deal with both China and the US on better terms than they do now. The US government has deemed a united Korea as a threat to its strategic interest of Chinese containment (just as it believed a united Germany to be a potential Soviet ally after WWII due to its geographical proximity), and thus it will do what it can to keep Korea divided.

We've lived with the threat of a Chinese invasion for 80 years. You've a lot to learn from us about who they are, what motivates them, and what they're trying to achieve.
It's nice that you edited it to include an actual point. A united korea would be great, especially in the context of what the topic of this thread is about; the current shitty situation of people living in the north. So far you've claimed; 1. The description of the shitty situation is US propaganda, 2. The propaganda is designed to instigate fear and keep the various countries china wants to conquer from being assimilated, 3. The countries would be better off without US meddling (implied) and being ultimately assimilated.

Now think critically for a second, how does false reports of the deplorable conditions in north korea work to convince people that the separation of the north and the south is a good thing?

Either life is hell is north korea and we should do something, or it's not and we should butt out.

Either case I'll let you get back to your PRC psyOP of trying to convince people that korea should be assimilated by china.
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nabiul wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 12:09 am
Now think critically for a second, how does false reports of the deplorable conditions in north korea work to convince people that the separation of the north and the south is a good thing?

Either life is hell is north korea and we should do something, or it's not and we should butt out.

Either case I'll let you get back to your PRC psyOP of trying to convince people that korea should be assimilated by china.
1. You lack the context to understand what's going on here. For decades both the ROK and ROC governments ran propaganda campaigns against the DPRK and PRC respectively. This didn't just involve denouncing the rival governments, but also more sinister tactics such as portraying the populace as lessers, undesirables, such that at best the audience would see them as pathetic, and at worst utter savages. This view was reinforced by the popular media, some government, some corporate. It got to the point where people saw them as below human beings - a manufactured xenophobia fuelled by political interests which are no longer relevant.

Reunification, while beneficial for Korea in the long term, will be an extremely costly and messy process in the short term (just look at West and East Germany, which arguably was a success story). By emphasizing current social issues going on in the rival nation, the RFA highlights the potential issues which will arise during reunification. Remember that your perspective on North Korea changes the closer your proximity is to it, and if they're your next door neighbour, naturally there is cause for alarm - sure maybe your northern neighbours are suffering, and maybe they'll live better lives if you can help them out, but are you willing to do so at the cost of rising crime, increase in social spending, and generally dealing with people whom you don't understand and thus find it difficult to emphathize with on a day-to-day basis? North Korean youth probably have much in common with South Korean youths, but this article portrays a rampant and wanton consumption of drugs which are illegal in South Korea (possession or sale of which automatically triggers the death penalty) to dissuade South Koreans from identifying with their northern counterparts.

Playing on the audience's paranoia and fear is a political tactic that North Americans are all too familiar with during election campaigns and scandals. Why can't they apply the same skepticism when it comes to other nations?

2. Why does the state of living in North Korea need to be defined by a loaded blanket term - hell or not? That you even suggested this possibility indicates that you're partial to the suggestion of North Korea being something undescribably horrible. This is a prime example of fear and paranoia at work. Humans fear the unknown, and this is ridiculously easy to exploit by not fully describing horrors, but instead leaving some things unsaid.

3. The possibility of China absorbing its neighbours (save for Taiwan) is so far gone that I think you're either ignorant or deliberately being distracting.

Bearing the responsibilities of a modern welfare state, China is not willing to administer more systems than it has to. Just as how the US maintains its hegemony through economic ties and close relations with local magnates and political figures, China aims to increase its global standing through soft power, not military might. Regional power however will be partially maintained by military might, as China must be able to back up its claims over its territories.
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loserga wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 1:06 am
1. You lack the context to understand what's going on here. For decades both the ROK and ROC governments ran propaganda campaigns against the DPRK and PRC respectively. This didn't just involve denouncing the rival governments, but also more sinister tactics such as portraying the populace as lessers, undesirables, such that at best the audience would see them as pathetic, and at worst utter savages. This view was reinforced by the popular media, some government, some corporate. It got to the point where people saw them as below human beings - a manufactured xenophobia fuelled by political interests which are no longer relevant.

Reunification, while beneficial for Korea in the long term, will be an extremely costly and messy process in the short term (just look at West and East Germany, which arguably was a success story). By emphasizing current social issues going on in the rival nation, the RFA highlights the potential issues which will arise during reunification. Remember that your perspective on North Korea changes the closer your proximity is to it, and if they're your next door neighbour, naturally there is cause for alarm - sure maybe your northern neighbours are suffering, and maybe they'll live better lives if you can help them out, but are you willing to do so at the cost of rising crime, increase in social spending, and generally dealing with people whom you don't understand and thus find it difficult to emphathize with on a day-to-day basis? North Korean youth probably have much in common with South Korean youths, but this article portrays a rampant and wanton consumption of drugs which are illegal in South Korea (possession or sale of which automatically triggers the death penalty) to dissuade South Koreans from identifying with their northern counterparts.

Playing on the audience's paranoia and fear is a political tactic that North Americans are all too familiar with during election campaigns and scandals. Why can't they apply the same skepticism when it comes to other nations?

2. Why does the state of living in North Korea need to be defined by a loaded blanket term - hell or not? That you even suggested this possibility indicates that you're partial to the suggestion of North Korea being something undescribably horrible. This is a prime example of fear and paranoia at work. Humans fear the unknown, and this is ridiculously easy to exploit by not fully describing horrors, but instead leaving some things unsaid.

3. The possibility of China absorbing its neighbours (save for Taiwan) is so far gone that I think you're either ignorant or deliberately being distracting.

Bearing the responsibilities of a modern welfare state, China is not willing to administer more systems than it has to. Just as how the US maintains its hegemony through economic ties and close relations with local magnates and political figures, China aims to increase its global standing through soft power, not military might. Regional power however will be partially maintained by military might, as China must be able to back up its claims over its territories.
2. Because I took a little time out of my life to do some basic research on communism and the actions of previous regimes that fall under this banner. What I little I had learned in my very limited study was enough to convince me for the rest of my life that hell on earth exists and it can be found under the boot of communism. Or are you going to claim that this is just US propaganda?
It is widely regarded by historians that The Great Leap resulted in tens of millions of deaths.[3] A lower-end estimate is 18 million, while extensive research by Chinese historian Yu Xiguang suggests the death toll from the movement is closer to 55.6 million.[4] Fellow historian Frank Dikötter asserts that "coercion, terror, and systematic violence were the foundation of the Great Leap Forward" and it "motivated one of the most deadly mass killings of human history".[5]
https://scottmanning.com/content/communist-body-count/

History shows that a communist totalitarian state with a living god as dear leader literally is hell, I don't know why you would even try to debate this unless you were really a psyops agent trying to sell communism.

3. Just the economic value of taiwan and south korea is enough to warrant military action and if it wasn't for the US they would have already. Ignorant or deliberately distracting? I won't accuse you of being ignorant but you are deliberately selling lies. My god more than half of the worlds leading semiconductor devices come out of those two countries. An alternate history where china took them over before they could leech off the US and develop technologically would be more preferable over having a huge chunk of the worlds fabs within arms reach of china.

**** whatever it is you're selling here because I'm not buying.
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An interesting point: as early as 2016 there were already a few pieces on North Korea's booming underground meth industries in the face of domestic demand. So nothing about this article can be seen as new information.

The question is, as has been pointed out in other threads, why is this article being released now?
Last edited by loserga on Feb 11th, 2019 3:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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nabiul wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 2:16 am
2. Because I took a little time out of my life to do some basic research on communism and the actions of previous regimes that fall under this banner. What I little I had learned in my very limited study was enough to convince me for the rest of my life that hell on earth exists and it can be found under the boot of communism. Or are you going to claim that this is just US propaganda?



https://scottmanning.com/content/communist-body-count/

History shows that a communist totalitarian state with a living god as dear leader literally is hell, I don't know why you would even try to debate this unless you were really a psyops agent trying to sell communism.

3. Just the economic value of taiwan and south korea is enough to warrant military action and if it wasn't for the US they would have already. Ignorant or deliberately distracting? I won't accuse you of being ignorant but you are deliberately selling lies. My god more than half of the worlds leading semiconductor devices come out of those two countries. An alternate history where china took them over before they could leech off the US and develop technologically would be more preferable over having a huge chunk of the worlds fabs within arms reach of china.

**** whatever it is you're selling here because I'm not buying.
Listing the body counts committed under these regimes from a time when the majority of the population was impoverished, education was lacking, communication was limited, and leaders were inflexible and unresponsive to change does little to reinforce your argument. Also, none of these regimes have achieved communism. What they've accomplished was the total centralization of power in the state's hands. For comparison you can also add in stats from other authoritatian states and see similar results.

The human mind is remarkably resilient at enduring hardship when it recognizes improvement. What seems impossible for you may be normal for others. Many communist regimes brought their population out of abject poverty into being just poor, and to express gratitude entire families remain loyal to the communist parties. Now a new Chinese middle class is emerging to replace a fledgling one which died 80 years ago. So no, there's hundreds of millions of people in the present for whom a communist state is not a living hell.

If one were to invade Taiwan for natural resources, they aren't going to find much. The Japanese extracted most of our useful resources throughout ~50 years of colonization, so much so that the ROC government immediately placed restrictions when they realized the extent. South Korea doesn't have the mines like North Korea has, so like Taiwan most of their economic strength currently comes from their IP - with chaebols consolidating most of them in SK, while a wide array of tech companies hold them in Taiwan.

You obviously don't understand global politics if you think China will ever invade Taiwan and South Korea for the sole purpose of gaining IP, US being there or not. Any invasion will require a pretext which other countries can recognize as legitimate (say entering Iraq in defence of Kuwait), support from allied nations, significant military commitment, increased government surveillance domestically, a massive amount of money (for something which is literally just ideas or 0s and 1s), and the risk of tanking popular support. A nation risks sacrificing its future when it invades another, and China's been chasing the future for the past century.

Instead, they can advance through other methods - steal/buy IP, merging/absorbing foreign companies or purchasing shares in foreign companies, engage in knowledge transfer with other nations, reverse engineer foreign-made products or literally copy them, etc. etc. That's not to say that China isn't capable of doing its own R&D, with there being a need to drive local innovation, but there's absolutely no need to invade a nation for ideas if taking them from others instead of coming up with them yourself is more cost-efficient.

When it come to manufacturing most Taiwanese companies have already moved the factories to China. TSMC is a special case among Taiwanese semiconductor companies because it currently generates 30% of Taiwan's GDP. For this reason the ROC government forbids the company from moving its 7nm fabs to the mainland. The US government would also prefer to prevent a promising leading-edge technological asset from falling into Chinese hands (x86 processors anyone?), giving them a competitive advantage.
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loserga wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 3:10 am
Listing the body counts committed under these regimes from a time when the majority of the population was impoverished, education was lacking, communication was limited, and leaders were inflexible and unresponsive to change does little to reinforce your argument. Also, none of these regimes have achieved communism. What they've accomplished was the total centralization of power in the state's hands. For comparison you can also add in stats from other authoritatian states and see similar results.

The human mind is remarkably resilient at enduring hardship when it recognizes improvement. What seems impossible for you may be normal for others. Many communist regimes brought their population out of abject poverty into being just poor, and to express gratitude entire families remain loyal to the communist parties. Now a new Chinese middle class is emerging to replace a fledgling one which died 80 years ago. So no, there's hundreds of millions of people in the present for whom a communist state is not a living hell.

If one were to invade Taiwan for natural resources, they aren't going to find much. The Japanese extracted most of our useful resources throughout ~50 years of colonization, so much so that the ROC government immediately placed restrictions when they realized the extent. South Korea doesn't have the mines like North Korea has, so like Taiwan most of their economic strength currently comes from their IP - with chaebols consolidating most of them in SK, while a wide array of tech companies hold them in Taiwan.

You obviously don't understand global politics if you think China will ever invade Taiwan and South Korea for the sole purpose of gaining IP, US being there or not. Any invasion will require a pretext which other countries can recognize as legitimate (say entering Iraq in defence of Kuwait), support from allied nations, significant military commitment, increased government surveillance domestically, a massive amount of money (for something which is literally just ideas or 0s and 1s), and the risk of tanking popular support. A nation risks sacrificing its future when it invades another, and China's been chasing the future for the past century.

Instead, they can advance through other methods - steal/buy IP, merging/absorbing foreign companies or purchasing shares in foreign companies, engage in knowledge transfer with other nations, reverse engineer foreign-made products or literally copy them, etc. etc. That's not to say that China isn't capable of doing its own R&D, with there being a need to drive local innovation, but there's absolutely no need to invade a nation for ideas if taking them from others instead of coming up with them yourself is more cost-efficient.

When it come to manufacturing most Taiwanese companies have already moved the factories to China. TSMC is a special case among Taiwanese semiconductor companies because it currently generates 30% of Taiwan's GDP. For this reason the ROC government forbids the company from moving its 7nm fabs to the mainland. The US government would also prefer to prevent a promising leading-edge technological asset from falling into Chinese hands (x86 processors anyone?), giving them a competitive advantage.
Yeah I thought you would say something like that; too long ago, not educated, not real communism etc. The usual distracting arguments of communist apologists with a hidden agenda. I need not look any further than my own lifetime to remember that tianamen square happened and that when I learned about it I was thinking how could they do such a thing to their own people and wow that was not even that long ago. If france was a full communist country I'm sure they would be slaughtering the yellow vests too right now.

Even putting the multiple repeated mass killings over ideology, race etc aside as if that wasn't a good enough reason to make even the suggestion of communism a crime punishable by jail time, you only need to look at modern day china to see how the inherent ideas that allowed these atrocities to occur are still in full effect despite the 'modernization' of their society. I'm sure you're fully aware of the chinese 'social credit system' which automatically assigns a number to indicate the 'goodness' of an individual in the eyes of the communist party based on metrics gathered from a mass surveillance network. The system is fully capable of visually locating any individual from any camera connected to the network and then applying 'punishments' based on what the network thinks the individual is doing. Punishments like preventing people from traveling, gaining employment or education or purchasing and selling goods and services etc. Pretty much the opposite of basic human rights as recognized by any non ass backwards nation and the usual precursors to every genocide ever.

What seems impossible for you may be normal for others. Many communist regimes brought their population out of abject poverty into being just poor, and to express gratitude entire families remain loyal to the communist parties.
Why don't you just come out and say what your true goal is comrade? Your MO is pretty clear, walls of text and unrelated points injected to misdirect and confuse while secretly trying to sell the chinese communist state.
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nabiul wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 10:25 am
Yeah I thought you would say something like that; too long ago, not educated, not real communism etc. The usual distracting arguments of communist apologists with a hidden agenda. I need not look any further than my own lifetime to remember that tianamen square happened and that when I learned about it I was thinking how could they do such a thing to their own people and wow that was not even that long ago. If france was a full communist country I'm sure they would be slaughtering the yellow vests too right now.

Even putting the multiple repeated mass killings over ideology, race etc aside as if that wasn't a good enough reason to make even the suggestion of communism a crime punishable by jail time, you only need to look at modern day china to see how the inherent ideas that allowed these atrocities to occur are still in full effect despite the 'modernization' of their society. I'm sure you're fully aware of the chinese 'social credit system' which automatically assigns a number to indicate the 'goodness' of an individual in the eyes of the communist party based on metrics gathered from a mass surveillance network. The system is fully capable of visually locating any individual from any camera connected to the network and then applying 'punishments' based on what the network thinks the individual is doing. Punishments like preventing people from traveling, gaining employment or education or purchasing and selling goods and services etc. Pretty much the opposite of basic human rights as recognized by any non ass backwards nation and the usual precursors to every genocide ever.




Why don't you just come out and say what your true goal is comrade? Your MO is pretty clear, walls of text and unrelated points injected to misdirect and confuse while secretly trying to sell the chinese communist state.
My intention is to provide context, which you are clearly not appreciating. That you don't recognize the context itself is also appalling.

My mom learned about Tiananmen Square as it was happening in real time through her American company's messaging boards, my parents' generation lived through Taiwan's transition from authoritarianism to democracy, and my grandparents' generation was conscripted to fight an enemy with a rifle bayonet behind them, so we are familiar with the horrors of a totalitarian regime. You lack knowledge on the motivations of these protests, the actions committed by involved parties, and the implications for China and Taiwan. I don't see the point in engaging with you on the Chinese government's domestic policies as you have continued to cherry pick your facts and sources.

Repeated mass anything (killings, induced famine, movements) is not a trait unique to communist states. Communist regimes have equal ability to commit the same scale and severity of domestic actions as other totalitarian regimes, and vice versa. The communist utopia espoused by Marx has never been attained in reality as the state finds itself unable to distribute evenly then dismantle itself after consolidating authority and the means of production. The Soviets found this out not long after consolidating power, and up to the end there were constant power struggles between those who advocated for a return to its revolutionary roots, and those who just wanted to keep the status quo. China eventually woke up after the Cultural Revolution, and after suppressing Mao's clique took the bold step of reestablishing foreign relations with the West. The only thing which has remained consistent over the decades is the existence of their totalitarian governments.

Xi's consolidation of power is unlike any period in global history - never has there been so much power and influence concentrated in the hands of one man. The suppression of other CPC factions was deemed a necessity after a coup d'etat was attempted against his mentor and predecessor (late 2000s, which never gained attention in Western media, but was heavily monitored in the East), and finding out that there was one in the works for himself (early 2010s, heavily publicized in East and West). Up to that point there were only two power factions remaining in the CPC, and both times the instigator was linked indisputably to the rival faction. Now that he runs the only remaining faction, endeavours like Alipay, the social credit system, and the great firewall are used by Xi and his subordinates to prevent any domestic challenges to his power. What he intends on doing with that power is anyone's guess, but at the very least his policies have been directly responsible for China's recent middle class expansion and improving trade relations, so there's plenty of things for current generation Chinese to both attack and praise him for. Enabling future generations of Chinese leaders to stymie growth, social freedom, and wealth circulation directly through their policies is obviously the biggest risk of Xi's consolidation of power, but most Chinese presidents since Deng have committed to long term strategies, so it's unlikely for any decision to be made lightly or on-the-fly.

The real threat for most Chinese are unauthorized acts independently committed by Xi's cronies while wielding his authority - another hallmark of a totalitarian government. Provided that things go as planned, however, the gap between rich and poor will continue to shrink, the expansion of the Chinese middle class will accelerate, and so widespread corruption will become less of a possibility with every passing year. If things don't go as planned, then another faction will form and contest for power. The ensuing power struggles will be bloody and brutal, and it will cost China dearly as they know very well. For neighbours like Japan, Korea and Taiwan, the simple response will be to move human resources and factories elsewhere while the factions weaken each other. It would be idiotic for any faction to prevent them from doing so at that point, as this will bring up the possibility of military action and trade sanctions.
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@nabiul Up to this point you have attacked my credibility by labelling me as a hypocrite, a leech, a Chinese psyops agent, and a Communist.

I have responded by calling you ignorant and deliberately distracting, and have provided the background under which this article is written, which you have repeatedly dismissed as irrelevant.

You have yet to provide a well-formed response, resorting to ad hominems and poorly thought out replies to support your belief of China and North Korea being the lands of undescribable horrors. I advise you to open your mind, expand your sources of information, and read more about global affairs. The best way to overcome your fear and paranoia is to learn about what is unknown to you.

Goodbye and I hope you can be a better informed and less rigid conversationalist the next time we meet.
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loserga wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 1:01 pm
@nabiul Up to this point you have attacked my credibility by labelling me as a hypocrite, a leech, a Chinese psyops agent, and a Communist.

I have responded by calling you ignorant and deliberately distracting, and have provided the background under which this article is written, which you have repeatedly dismissed as irrelevant.

You have yet to provide a well-formed response, resorting to ad hominems and poorly thought out replies to support your belief of China and North Korea being the lands of undescribable horrors. I advise you to open your mind, expand your sources of information, and read more about global affairs. The best way to overcome your fear and paranoia is to learn about what is unknown to you.

Goodbye and I hope you can be a better informed and less rigid conversationalist the next time we meet.
Sorry, there isn't enough time in my life or the metal capacity to open my mind and become accepting of all the ideologies of the many many many people who wish to see me dead or enslaved. At some point you have to stop giving a shit and categorize the insanity that is out there to be able to learn new and useful things. Knowledge that I value much more than the policies of the 1000th incarnation of whatever government that will supposedly solve societies problems as long as I do what they want or even give my life for them if they please. I have studied and learned what I needed to learn and developed conclusions; one of which is that communism is inherently evil and counter to my core beliefs. I no longer remember what it was that I learned because that information has been pushed out to make room for new things, but I remember the conclusions and my stance on it clearly.

The enemy of my enemy is not my friend, just more enemies selling a different kind of oppression. Converse all you want, the facts are that you live here in canada and not north korea, or china or taiwan. If life was better in any of those places under the ideologies they have fostered, you would be living over there and not here. It's not like the government of canada has restricted you from using transportation or getting a job because you wrote something critical of it on social media.

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