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Nurses laugh as WWII Vet DIES.

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  • Nov 20th, 2017 1:27 pm
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[OP]
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Dec 4, 2010
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Nurses laugh as WWII Vet DIES.

Another day, another example of douchebaggery in the world.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/vi ... spartanntp
Hidden camera footage recently made public revealed a decorated World War II veteran died after fighting for air while a pair of nurses laughed in front of him.

No matter how severe the disciplining these two sad excuse for human beings get, it won't make this family forget how their loved one spent their last seconds alive. How undignified to go out like that.
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That home is trying to rebrand itself but the damage is done. They tried to defend these ladies and even after tapes discovered tried blocking the tapes release instead of decrying her actions unequivocally. 100% wrong way to act if you're really oriented toward your patients/customers. Place should have been shut down permanently. Terrible ending to an honorable person. Just glad all things aligned to out these pos who wouldn't have been caught if not for the hidden camera. The disconnect from humanity is obvious and these women need to be put in a nuthouse before they hurt someone else they're in charge of caretaking for.
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Feb 7, 2017
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I did not view the video.

This story is disturbing enough.

In my honest opinion posting any video showing that, would also be unkind to the soul who has passed.

This vet is due all our respect. RIP
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PointsHubby wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 2:18 pm
I did not view the video.

This story is disturbing enough.

In my honest opinion posting any video showing that, would also be unkind to the soul who has passed.

This vet is due all our respect. RIP
Some of us prefer to see it to believe it, and there's nothing here that's obscene or violent, merely uncomfortable and angering (the video here is in edited clips not raw footage). We all have the right to choose whether or not to look, please don't try and force your personal choice on others.

I see this as a positive thing because without the video it would have never been known. This is a good way to raise awareness of this issue and for those of us who care about our elderly family, to regularly check up on them or be a lot more motivating to ensure they're in a proper home where they're being taken care of properly. Hell, after this, I'd consider a hidden camera myself if I had a parent or grandparent in a home.

I hope it also motivates many homes throughout the US to better audit their staff for things like this lest they ruin themselves over issues like this.

Just a shitty way to treat an elderly person in general. A WW2 vet.. no words.
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I really wish news sources would omit the fact that the person was a war veteran. It is immaterial to the story, and only serves to get an emotional reaction out of the reader.
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Was this a for-profit home?
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1) Nurses, particularly in nursing homes, see death all the time. They don't walk around their workplace treating it like a funeral all the time. Nurses "somehow" manage to emotionally tune that stuff out, and in a strange sort of way, still laugh and smile. The ones who can't do that don't tend to survive psychologically as nurses for very long.

2) Without watching the tape or studying the condition of the individual, there's cases in which, particularly with lung cancer, where there is little to nothing that can be done for a patient other than perhaps get them another shot of morphine. I've personally seen 2 deaths due to lung cancer close-up, and it is an absolutely gruesome process which scars me even to the day. Options for palliation of respiratory symptoms are limited short of administering what may very well be lethal doses of morphine which has its own set of ethical/legal problems. And may not even be at the discretion of a floor nurse.

3) Nursing homes and hospitals for the dying are filled with people suffering various forms of dementias and/or drug-induced psychosis'. Staff at such facilities often "tune out" such calls for help and focus on their jobs. A nurse who has a busy night of administering medication to 50-100 patients may develop a hyperfocus on his/her particular job and ignore the other stuff. Its sad, but if a nurse were to spend time talking to every lonely old lady or man in such homes/hospitals, they'd never get any work done.

4) The patient in question may have been subject to an order for no resuscitation efforts, as is common for people of such age/condition.

Not to defend the undefendable, but if you've spent a significant amount of time in a modern nursing home with over-worked employees and the usual chronic understaffing, such behavior may be perfectly explainable within such context.
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mr_raider wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 8:32 pm
Was this a for-profit home?
I would assume because its the US that most elderly related homes (even elderly rehab facilities) are private.

One thing I noted though is that for Medicare, as pointed out somewhere in either OP's article or another somewhere, they rate the homes. And while this home passed an inspection in May following all the shit that happened, they got "one star". I'd seriously question at this moment in time who'd ever take their loved one to this place, unless they wanted to collect on life insurance asap.
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burnt69 wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 8:43 pm
1) Nurses, particularly in nursing homes, see death all the time. They don't walk around their workplace treating it like a funeral all the time. Nurses "somehow" manage to emotionally tune that stuff out, and in a strange sort of way, still laugh and smile. The ones who can't do that don't tend to survive psychologically as nurses for very long.

2) Without watching the tape or studying the condition of the individual, there's cases in which, particularly with lung cancer, where there is little to nothing that can be done for a patient other than perhaps get them another shot of morphine. I've personally seen 2 deaths due to lung cancer close-up, and it is an absolutely gruesome process which scars me even to the day. Options for palliation of respiratory symptoms are limited short of administering what may very well be lethal doses of morphine which has its own set of ethical/legal problems. And may not even be at the discretion of a floor nurse.

3) Nursing homes and hospitals for the dying are filled with people suffering various forms of dementias and/or drug-induced psychosis'. Staff at such facilities often "tune out" such calls for help and focus on their jobs. A nurse who has a busy night of administering medication to 50-100 patients may develop a hyperfocus on his/her particular job and ignore the other stuff. Its sad, but if a nurse were to spend time talking to every lonely old lady or man in such homes/hospitals, they'd never get any work done.

4) The patient in question may have been subject to an order for no resuscitation efforts, as is common for people of such age/condition.

[...]
^ This.

I wonder if there was a chance of the guy being brain dead already (or permanently impaired somehow) after a successful resuscitation or change of ventilator (respirator, breathing machine) --for a non faulty one if that was really the cause of his death and not a patient's inability to continue breathing (his lungs processing O2/CO2, his heart pumping blood, etc) even with mechanical assistance and O2 supply.
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burnt69 wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 8:43 pm
1) Nurses, particularly in nursing homes, see death all the time. They don't walk around their workplace treating it like a funeral all the time. Nurses "somehow" manage to emotionally tune that stuff out, and in a strange sort of way, still laugh and smile. The ones who can't do that don't tend to survive psychologically as nurses for very long.

2) Without watching the tape or studying the condition of the individual, there's cases in which, particularly with lung cancer, where there is little to nothing that can be done for a patient other than perhaps get them another shot of morphine. I've personally seen 2 deaths due to lung cancer close-up, and it is an absolutely gruesome process which scars me even to the day. Options for palliation of respiratory symptoms are limited short of administering what may very well be lethal doses of morphine which has its own set of ethical/legal problems. And may not even be at the discretion of a floor nurse.

3) Nursing homes and hospitals for the dying are filled with people suffering various forms of dementias and/or drug-induced psychosis'. Staff at such facilities often "tune out" such calls for help and focus on their jobs. A nurse who has a busy night of administering medication to 50-100 patients may develop a hyperfocus on his/her particular job and ignore the other stuff. Its sad, but if a nurse were to spend time talking to every lonely old lady or man in such homes/hospitals, they'd never get any work done.

4) The patient in question may have been subject to an order for no resuscitation efforts, as is common for people of such age/condition.

Not to defend the undefendable, but if you've spent a significant amount of time in a modern nursing home with over-worked employees and the usual chronic understaffing, such behavior may be perfectly explainable within such context.
All completely irrelevant. I work very closely with nurses, not in a nursing home, but in a different environment with other susceptible people. I make very dark jokes, as do most of my coworkers. With that said, when it comes time to perform potentially life saving measures, I have never seen someone not take it seriously. I can promise you that nurses at a nursing home are no more burned out, complacent, etc. than the nurses at my place of work, as well as myself and my co-workers. In fact, the difference is in my place of work, we're performing life saving measures on the worst kind of people that society has to offer, yet we do it anyway because that's what we get paid to do.

This guy clearly didn't have a DNR or the nurses wouldn't have performed CPR at all. Instead, they did a very half-assed job of it. It takes over 10 seconds of CPR in order to get oxygen to the brain, so every time those nurses stopped CPR, they were effectively doing nothing at all the entire time. They get paid to do a job and they didn't do it. They see a lot of death for sure, as do I in my workplace, yet I still perform my job duties. I also have numerous friends who are nurses in a hospital, one of which is a nurse in the ER. I'm sure she sees deaths almost every shift, yet she still does what she can to save people because that's her job.

These nurses should have been charged criminally. There's no reason to not perform CPR in this case
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aviador wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 9:59 pm
^ This.

I wonder if there was a chance of the guy being brain dead already (or permanently impaired somehow) after a successful resuscitation or change of ventilator (respirator, breathing machine) --for a non faulty one if that was really the cause of his death and not a patient's inability to continue breathing (his lungs processing O2/CO2, his heart pumping blood, etc) even with mechanical assistance and O2 supply.
Sure there was a chance. In all likelihood he was not coming back regardless of what those nurses did, but they didn't even try. They didn't even give the guy a fighting chance. It's not unusual to get a pulse back. I've done CPR many times and have gotten a pulse back, but I've never done CPR on someone who has walked out of the hospital. The difference is I did what I could to give the person a fighting chance, these nurses couldn't even do that.
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Disgusting. Both nurses were fired and stripped of their licenses and the family settled out of court.
[OP]
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webshark wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 11:54 pm
Disgusting. Both nurses were fired and stripped of their licenses and the family settled out of court.
Article?
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Supercooled wrote:
Nov 20th, 2017 7:47 am
Article?
I managed to gather all that from the link you posted. Did you even read what you posted?
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[OP]
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eldeejay wrote:
Nov 20th, 2017 9:42 am
I managed to gather all that from the link you posted. Did you even read what you posted?
Not completely. The headline had me incensed.

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