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[OFFICIAL] Cycling thread for commuters and the casual enthusiast

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[OFFICIAL] Cycling thread for commuters and the casual enthusiast

Hello!

I found the other cycling thread very roadie centric.
I'm making this thread dedicated to all the people who commute by bicycle and the casual enthusiast. Nothing wrong getting decked out in spandex and racing around in a $5000 bike... Its just a bit too intense for me. :lol:

I will be guiding the discussion of this thread. Enjoy!

ImageImage
ImageImage

So what type of bikes are you into? Do you commute, or do you just ride recreationally on trails?

Myself... I've been riding old steel road bikes for a few years now.... At first it was because I wanted to get into road cycling, but I could only afford really old bikes. Now I just like the charm of old vintage steel bikes. :cheesygri

I commute to work by bike, and i travel most places by bike since I live near the downtown Toronto core.

I've always wanted a dutch bike though. I think its better suited when I go out since I wear non-athletic clothing most of the time.



Useful Cycling Links
Bicycle map and routes for Major Canadian cities

http://www.royaldistributing.com good off season deals
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I strongly prefer the upright posture of steel city bikes. I don't care if it has gears or not. Biking is not fun if I have to be hunched over some mountain bike handle bars, or speed bike handle bars.

The best bikes I've owned have cost between $15 and $30. And a couple of decent ones cost me $0 because they were gifts from people moving away.

I think it's a shame that in Canada people seem to buy only mountain bikes or speed bikes. Hardly ever see city bikes or folding bikes even though I live in the city.

The best thing about the city bikes is it accomodates a basket on the front, and a passenger on the back. Or you can put bike bags on the back. Or an empty heineken crate to carry stuff. It's so much more functional than the mountain bike or speed bike, I don't understand why it is not more popular in north america. People keep buying the mountain/speed bikes, so stores keep stocking them leaving no room for the city bikes. City bikes are also much less expensive, generally under $50 used (unless someone is trying to rip you off and charge $500 for it, which occasionally happens in north america). As an added bonus, city bikes look much nicer too.

The way cycling is done:

Image

Image

Note the summer dress in the first picture. Canadian women need to start wearing more summer dresses. Especially with a floral print, or just a simple light colour. :)

When I lived in the Netherlands the city bike was my mode of transportation absolutely everywhere. But here in Canada I think it's too dangerous to be on a bike. Even in London England I think it's too dangerous to be on a bike because the car culture is so pervasive and the roads are so narrow with no separate bike roadways. So I prefer running or walking wherever I need to go in canada, that way I still get a light workout (actually I think it's a better workout than biking, at least I'm in better shape without the bike than I was with it).
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nauru wrote:
Apr 16th, 2012 11:51 pm
I strongly prefer the upright posture of steel city bikes. I don't care if it has gears or not. Biking is not fun if I have to be hunched over some mountain bike handle bars, or speed bike handle bars.

The best bikes I've owned have cost between $15 and $30. And a couple of decent ones cost me $0 because they were gifts from people moving away.

I think it's a shame that in Canada people seem to buy only mountain bikes or speed bikes. Hardly ever see city bikes or folding bikes even though I live in the city.

The best thing about the city bikes is it accomodates a basket on the front, and a passenger on the back. Or you can put bike bags on the back. Or an empty heineken crate to carry stuff. It's so much more functional than the mountain bike or speed bike, I don't understand why it is not more popular in north america. People keep buying the mountain/speed bikes, so stores keep stocking them leaving no room for the city bikes. City bikes are also much less expensive, generally under $50 used (unless someone is trying to rip you off and charge $500 for it, which occasionally happens in north america). As an added bonus, city bikes look much nicer too.

The way cycling is done:

[IMG]http://i2.lulzimg.com/a9c91661c7.jpg[/MG]

[IMG]http://i2.lulzimg.com/e2c0ddf107.jpg[/IG]

Note the summer dress in the first picture. Canadian women need to start wearing more summer dresses. Especially with a floral print, or just a simple light colour. :)

When I lived in the Netherlands the city bike was my mode of transportation absolutely everywhere. But here in Canada I think it's too dangerous to be on a bike. Even in London England I think it's too dangerous to be on a bike because the car culture is so pervasive and the roads are so narrow with no separate bike roadways. So I prefer running or walking wherever I need to go in canada, that way I still get a light workout (actually I think it's a better workout than biking, at least I'm in better shape without the bike than I was with it).


Wow. You lived in NETHERLANDS? Aka Bikerlands?
props!

YEah you are right... Biking in Toronto is a bit dangerous b/c of the car centric culture. But its not so bad. More people are out on bikes b/c of high gas prices and ttc prices. Theres more bike lanes now then before, and bixi was introduced... So that'll help out the bicycle culture in Toronto.

I get a little thrill from zipping through rush hour city traffic. It just makes me feel so free gliding pass all the cars while cautiously looking out for open doors, turning cars, and jay walking pedestrians.

I have a road bike, and I too sometimes wished I had an upright seating position. But I just like the speed of the road bike and drop bars.
I'm going to install a rear rack and basket on it. Maybe If I can find a vintage coke/pepsi wooden crate. I'll attach that to the rack for a vintage look. lol. It'll look ghetto, but at least it'll be easier to carry my stuff.
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Jun 2, 2010
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There are serious cyclists and there are casual bike riders and they don't really understand each other. I am one of the few in my circles who is both. Relevant to this thread, I have:

1980's Fiori Modena (1980's steel road bike), with some slight upgrades as dictated by aging components. Full fenders with flaps. This is my main commuter. "It's not noodly, it's compliant". Hehe.
Early 1990's Peugeot City/hybrid bike. Gripshift, 21 speed and cantilever brakes and a very upright riding posture. This is my wife's commuter, though I borrow it sometimes. Dubbed the Purple Party Commuter.
Peugeot Cruiser. Blue, with chrome fenders, white wall tires, 4 speed coaster hub. Dubbed the Beer Bike.

I often see it from the point of view of the casual enthusiast: riding a bicycle in street clothes is a foreign concept to the serious cyclist and commuting can only be a 'big thing' with a carefully planned route, clothing change and a dedicated high performance commuter bike. But the flip side is that the casual enthusiast has a hard time understanding why one would want to ride for hours without a final destination, only to loop back, or why one would ride into the pain threshold and try to stay there as long as possible.

But at the end of the day, we all love the feeling of gliding on two wheels and everyone should just wish each other a safe ride.
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I commute about 15 kms one-way to work on my >10yr old full-suspension Gary Fisher F3. Stupidly heavy mountain bike for 100% paved bike lanes and roads. And it's got panniers :)
But I don't mind, I just say it's a work-out, plus I got the bike for 100 bucks a few yrs ago. But one day I'll buy a nice road or ccross.

I do ride to work/home with my cycle shorts because it's more comfortable but there's a gym next to my work where I can shower & change so no biggie for me. What I love is that I can easily put >100kms a week if I ride more than 3 times a week to work. Beats having to go on a single ride on the weekend just to get some kms in.
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yannercycle wrote:
Apr 17th, 2012 8:12 am
There are serious cyclists and there are casual bike riders and they don't really understand each other. I am one of the few in my circles who is both. Relevant to this thread, I have:

1980's Fiori Modena (1980's steel road bike), with some slight upgrades as dictated by aging components. Full fenders with flaps. This is my main commuter. "It's not noodly, it's compliant". Hehe.
Early 1990's Peugeot City/hybrid bike. Gripshift, 21 speed and cantilever brakes and a very upright riding posture. This is my wife's commuter, though I borrow it sometimes. Dubbed the Purple Party Commuter.
Peugeot Cruiser. Blue, with chrome fenders, white wall tires, 4 speed coaster hub. Dubbed the Beer Bike.

I often see it from the point of view of the casual enthusiast: riding a bicycle in street clothes is a foreign concept to the serious cyclist and commuting can only be a 'big thing' with a carefully planned route, clothing change and a dedicated high performance commuter bike. But the flip side is that the casual enthusiast has a hard time understanding why one would want to ride for hours without a final destination, only to loop back, or why one would ride into the pain threshold and try to stay there as long as possible.

But at the end of the day, we all love the feeling of gliding on two wheels and everyone should just wish each other a safe ride.
I’m not sure if those hardcore guys do any commuting or pleasure cycling. Whenever I see them they never have any locks on them. They probably put in 100km+ of cycling a day. I can’t imagine cycling that much without at least 1 stop the cafe, a restaurant, a friends house, or for menchies frozen yogourt on a summer day. :lol:

I just got a bad imrpession... Because the few times I've said 'nice bike!' to a roadie at a stop light... They'd say 'thanks' while giving me this sneering look. I guess I ran into a few elitist roadies... But I'm sure they're very nice people.
But whenever I do that to a fixie rider, cruiser, commuter, city bike rider... We'd have a chat and then go on about our day. I think this is the way it should be.

Cyclist unite!!!

Sylvestre wrote:
Apr 17th, 2012 8:45 am
I commute about 15 kms one-way to work on my >10yr old full-suspension Gary Fisher F3. Stupidly heavy mountain bike for 100% paved bike lanes and roads. And it's got panniers :)
But I don't mind, I just say it's a work-out, plus I got the bike for 100 bucks a few yrs ago. But one day I'll buy a nice road or ccross.
I do ride to work/home with my cycle shorts because it's more comfortable but there's a gym next to my work where I can shower & change so no biggie for me. What I love is that I can easily put >100kms a week if I ride more than 3 times a week to work. Beats having to go on a single ride on the weekend just to get some kms in.
Nice! I usually just change from dress shirt to tshirt in the summers... To lazy to change my pants. Luckily I don’t sweat as much... Even in sweltering heat!
You should consider putting some skinny tires on that mountain bike. It’ll help a lot. Some mountain bike rims can go down to 28mm in width. I had an old mountain bike that I kinda turned into a hybrid. I put some 35mm width tires on it and it seems like it flys now. But newer mountain bikes can fit skinnier tires. I ordered a chain tensioner so it’ll soon be converted to a single speed.
CSR wrote:
Apr 17th, 2012 9:16 am
I think its safe to say those Roadies are also ride other types of bikes.
I have a stable of bikes: commuter, mountain bike, road bike (long distances), track bike... each serves a purpose.
I just found the other thread very roadie centric.
No mention of scenic routes, touring, commuting, lock discussion etc... It seemed to be mostly chatter about high end road bikes, road racing accessories/equipment, and training.
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Apr 17th, 2012 10:46 am
Cyclist unite!!!

yet you created this separate thread.

:facepalm:

FWIW, i have 3 bikes, a snobby very expensive road bike, a 29'er hardtail and my "cheap" commuter, which is a Kona Paddy Wagon which has a rear rack.

I commute to work from May to October 12 KM each way most days.
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i try to bike whenever i can since weathers getting warmer again and its a pretty good workout.
Image
im all about the roadies. thinking of fixie though.
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Wow kona bikes are hilariously expensive. The "Africa bike" which is supposedly for people who are less fortunate, has a price tag of $500 plus tax. :facepalm:

Maybe I will start importing city bikes from the Netherlands and selling them here at 400% markup. Retail price would still be cheaper than city bikes currently available here.
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MS MSP wrote:
Apr 17th, 2012 12:44 pm
yet you created this separate thread.

:facepalm:

FWIW, i have 3 bikes, a snobby very expensive road bike, a 29'er hardtail and my "cheap" commuter, which is a Kona Paddy Wagon which has a rear rack.

I commute to work from May to October 12 KM each way most days.

I'm sorry I had too. :D
I just found that all post not related to road cycling/mountain biking were ignored in that other thread. I also had a feeling that all the super speed racing discussion scared off the other fractions of the cycling community.

And what I meant was... Unite in the Bicycle community and work towards a positive and influential Bicycle Culture (which I find lacking, even in a place like Toronto). Of course... Everyone will have their own preference for riding and I don't see the problem with different threads discussion different aspects of cycling.
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Jan 13, 2004
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I like this thread.

I've done a lot of online and forum research but figured I could get some opinions here. I'm looking to do some casual cycling and haven't owned a bike since this crappy $100 Walmart one I had in elementary school. I think I will be mostly riding on paved paths (say, Niagara, Niagara on the Lake, Lakeshore).

What bike/brand should I go for? What is the best bang for the buck? Ideally $500ish is the budget, but I'm willing to pay for quality and specs.

Should I go for a hybrid (vs a MTB)? Would a front suspension be necessary? Ideally, the lighter the better, so what weight of bike can I get for $500ish? (I notice for MTB most entry-level are 30lbs). Will I even need gears or single speed will do? Do I need disc brakes? Can I even get a hydraulic disc brake at my price range?

Thanks in advance. Sorry for all the question marks in my post =)
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Does anyone know where I can import a complete kit for a classic city bike, so that I can assemble it myself? I'm thinking Chinese businesses probably export a lot of these assemble-it-yourself bicycle kits, but I don't know the language and can't get around on the Chinese websites. Alibaba has some nice models listed, but they have minimum orders of 100-200. I only want 1.

Should look similar to this.
Image
Doesn't matter if the frame has a crossbar or not. But fully upright posture, nice big splash guards, rear rack, and attractive shape are essential. No "hybrids" please.
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any recommendations for affordable shops in toronto for commuter bikes (used or otherwise)? i'd love me a batavus or brompton, but not a fan of the cost.
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J W wrote:
Apr 17th, 2012 2:32 pm
I like this thread.

I've done a lot of online and forum research but figured I could get some opinions here. I'm looking to do some casual cycling and haven't owned a bike since this crappy $100 Walmart one I had in elementary school. I think I will be mostly riding on paved paths (say, Niagara, Niagara on the Lake, Lakeshore).

What bike/brand should I go for? What is the best bang for the buck? Ideally $500ish is the budget, but I'm willing to pay for quality and specs.

Should I go for a hybrid (vs a MTB)? Would a front suspension be necessary? Ideally, the lighter the better, so what weight of bike can I get for $500ish? (I notice for MTB most entry-level are 30lbs). Will I even need gears or single speed will do? Do I need disc brakes? Can I even get a hydraulic disc brake at my price range?

Thanks in advance. Sorry for all the question marks in my post =)

Disc brakes are nice to have because they do perform really well. But conventional brakes that are well maintained will suit most people fine unless they are looking for every single edge performance wise. I find a front suspension is a bit unneccessary for riding on paved roads.

$500 is a lower price point... But there are some bang for your buck models out there.

A single speed would be nice.
Image
The KHS soul is a good value... $430 brand new. It has flat handle bars so theres more comfort over traditional drop bars
The tires are 700x28. So they're skinny but not too skinny. This is if gears and cargo aren't a big concern.

They also make a model called the Urban Extreme...
This bike is a hybrid and comes fitted with a rear rack and fenders. So its very practical.
http://www.khsbicycles.com/06_urban_x_12.htm

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