Home & Garden

The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread

[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Apr 17, 2005
10710 posts
1232 upvotes
Brampton
artlan wrote:
Mar 11th, 2018 1:04 pm
Hello my fellow RFDers,

We are moving into a new house and wanted to replace the carpet on the 2nd floor with hardwood to match the staircase and our 1st floor. With all the mounting expenses, we are not really looking to spend more than $3.50 - 4.00 sq. ft.

This is the colour we want at 3.25":

Image

Image

and need around $650-700 sqft total. We were quoted $4.60 per sq. ft. for this wood/brand. Anyone can suggest a retailer that can sell same colour/grade for a lower price that fits within out budget? Willing to pay cash.

Thank you!
You might be better off waiting until you are ready financially to get the job done with better quality product than rush and get the cheapest product you can find IMO! You also don't want the cheapest installer or you might regret it later. There's usually more work involved with upstairs so add extra cost for nosings if you don't have any, rescrewing subfloor, etc.
The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread
Voted RFD "Most Helpful Thread of 2012"
__________________________________________________
If I helped in any way, please click the UpVote button or UpVote my Thread(s) :)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 3, 2005
1211 posts
55 upvotes
Markham
Hello All. This is not specifically hardwood flooring question but just wanted some opinions. Im choosing the finishes for my pre-construction condo and the option of Vinyl Composite Core or Engineered hardwood are both offered (no extra cost for either choice). They state that vinyl is easier for maintenance and won't scuff or expand due to water spills etc compared to engineered hardwood. Basically the salesperson was trying to sell us on the low maintenance so its better for rental units (I know that the cost to the builder will most likely also be cheaper if I get the vinyl option). I plan to live in this unit for 3/4 years at least and then maybe look at renting it out after. If you were in my shoes, would you go engineering hardwood or the Vinyl Composite Core?
Member
Jan 14, 2005
319 posts
4 upvotes
Hi all. I understand the difference between Engineered hardwood and Solid hardwood, however our installer has suggested that we purchased engineered as it generally manages the climate\humidity fluctuations better than solid. However, when shopping for a product almost all of the stores told us that it is just preference and we should be fine if a good quality product is purchased. We have found a solid hardwood product made by Armstrong which we really like but are now reluctant based on the advice of our installer. For GTA climate, can any of the experts comment on how much of an issue this really is (we have a central humidifier). Appreciate the advice!
Deal Addict
Aug 21, 2006
1160 posts
275 upvotes
Well thanks for all the advice here... Got my hallway (missing two rows. making a custom piece for my transition to the bathroom) and nursey done :) Not bad for my first time... Gonna do the master bedroom this week just gotta finish ripping up the parquet in there...
Images
  • IMG_20180313_154949953.jpg
  • IMG_20180312_205149868.jpg
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1195 posts
194 upvotes
Toronto
sketty55 wrote:
Mar 13th, 2018 9:21 am
Hi all. I understand the difference between Engineered hardwood and Solid hardwood, however our installer has suggested that we purchased engineered as it generally manages the climate\humidity fluctuations better than solid. However, when shopping for a product almost all of the stores told us that it is just preference and we should be fine if a good quality product is purchased. We have found a solid hardwood product made by Armstrong which we really like but are now reluctant based on the advice of our installer. For GTA climate, can any of the experts comment on how much of an issue this really is (we have a central humidifier). Appreciate the advice!
Solid hardwood is stronger. ..
Last edited by MrDisco on Mar 14th, 2018 2:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: no soliciting
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1195 posts
194 upvotes
Toronto
rockychocbill wrote:
Mar 6th, 2018 1:12 pm
Stumbled across this thread yesterday. Thumbs up! I've been reading back many pages and a lot of what I'm reading has confirmed my research. We are looking to install about 1,700 sq. ft of wire scraped, engineered hickory (1/2" x 7.5", low (5-8%) UV gloss) throughout the middle and top floors on top of plywood sub-floors. House is 20 years old with original carpet and tile. I will be pulling up the existing carpet and tile. The floors are fairly level but I fully expect the installer to have to do some leveling. I will also ask him to screw down the sub-floor throughout. We have a few squeaks. We also have a small dog (15lbs). We are looking at a Laurentian hardwood product. I will attach the spec sheet. A few questions please.

1) Any opinions on Laurentian as a manufacturer? We are choosing them at this point because we can access their product through our consumer shopping club. Our cost for this material is approx. $5.50 sq. ft.

2) Manufacturer states the floor can be stapled, glued or floated. We will have tenants below us. We are sock or slipper people anyway, but every little bit helps I guess. From what I've read, a floating floor with proper felt underlay will reduce the noise transfer significantly. Is this true and does it also help with the sometimes "hollow" feeling if the floor is not "perfectly" level in some spots?

3) Installation quotes are $2.25 sq. ft. for floating and $3.50 for glue or nail. We have long continuous runs, since the LR/DR are attached as are the Family Room/Eating Area/Kitchen. Also there is a fairly long hallway on both levels. Humidity is pretty consistent here in Vancouver. We will also have a powder room/laundry room/front entry/2 fireplace hearths with tile on the main floor and 2 tile baths upstairs. I also prefer a level (no T-Mold) transition. Which method would you recommend for this installation?

Thank you,
Bill

Laurentian-Belvedere.JPG
Depends on how wide the flooring is, if 6 inch and up you need to glue and nail if lower than that you can just nail. ..
Last edited by MrDisco on Mar 14th, 2018 2:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: no soliciting
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1195 posts
194 upvotes
Toronto
kcirtap78 wrote:
Mar 13th, 2018 11:04 pm
Well thanks for all the advice here... Got my hallway (missing two rows. making a custom piece for my transition to the bathroom) and nursey done :) Not bad for my first time... Gonna do the master bedroom this week just gotta finish ripping up the parquet in there...
Shouldve put a transition piece or border piece between the tile and flooring
Deal Addict
Aug 21, 2006
1160 posts
275 upvotes
Heavenleigh85 wrote:
Mar 14th, 2018 2:26 am
Shouldve put a transition piece or border piece between the tile and flooring
I will have a reducer that will go there. It's temporary as eventually that plan is to remove tile in the dining room and tie it all in together. The tile in the dinning room is 1/2 inch higher
Member
Jan 14, 2005
319 posts
4 upvotes
Heavenleigh85 wrote:
Mar 14th, 2018 2:19 am
Solid hardwood is stronger. Send me pm if looking for discounted rates on flooring
Thanks, but what about the differences in the way they respond to climate\humidity? Is it really much of a difference for climate in the GTA?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 8, 2009
1503 posts
532 upvotes
Ontario
sketty55 wrote:
Mar 14th, 2018 9:31 am
Thanks, but what about the differences in the way they respond to climate\humidity? Is it really much of a difference for climate in the GTA?
Wood expands perpendicular to the grain but hardly at all along the grain. By bonding a veneer of hardwood to plywood with multi-directional laminated layers the product becomes more stable and less prone to expansion due to humidity. However solid hardwood is used extensively (not basements) without issues if correctly installed with enough allowance for expansion. I have seen homes left in the summer without AC on or deumidification and hardwood floors have irreversibly cupped. Another benefit of engineered product is that it is less prone to warping prior to laying. Sometimes longer lengths of hardwood take a little persuasion to go in straight and there will be a few unusable lengths due to this. Wider solid hardwood is more prone to cupping and so engineered products are the way to go for wider planks.
[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Apr 17, 2005
10710 posts
1232 upvotes
Brampton
sketty55 wrote:
Mar 13th, 2018 9:21 am
Hi all. I understand the difference between Engineered hardwood and Solid hardwood, however our installer has suggested that we purchased engineered as it generally manages the climate\humidity fluctuations better than solid. However, when shopping for a product almost all of the stores told us that it is just preference and we should be fine if a good quality product is purchased. We have found a solid hardwood product made by Armstrong which we really like but are now reluctant based on the advice of our installer. For GTA climate, can any of the experts comment on how much of an issue this really is (we have a central humidifier). Appreciate the advice!
sketty55 wrote:
Mar 13th, 2018 9:21 am
Hi all. I understand the difference between Engineered hardwood and Solid hardwood, however our installer has suggested that we purchased engineered as it generally manages the climate\humidity fluctuations better than solid. However, when shopping for a product almost all of the stores told us that it is just preference and we should be fine if a good quality product is purchased. We have found a solid hardwood product made by Armstrong which we really like but are now reluctant based on the advice of our installer. For GTA climate, can any of the experts comment on how much of an issue this really is (we have a central humidifier). Appreciate the advice!
Yes it is a personal preference. If you feel that you will keep the RH levels in the house stable throughout the year (which is pretty much impossible) then solid may be good for you. Personally prefer engineered hardwood over solid anyday due to its stability. Engineered hardwood has a higher range for relative humidity, does not expand and contract as much as solid, you will see less cupping and crowning, minimal gaps and definitely less cracked boards. Installation process is exactly the same as solid and with a good manufacturer, you will not be able to tell the difference between the two. Hardness is the same for both. A lot of stores will get a better price for solid than engineered therefore they will push more to sell solid!
Heavenleigh85 wrote:
Mar 14th, 2018 2:19 am
Solid hardwood is stronger. Send me pm if looking for discounted rates on flooring
Very knowledgeable advice Thumbs Down Sign This thread is not about advertising your own or somebody else's business!
The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread
Voted RFD "Most Helpful Thread of 2012"
__________________________________________________
If I helped in any way, please click the UpVote button or UpVote my Thread(s) :)
[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Apr 17, 2005
10710 posts
1232 upvotes
Brampton
Kyle_87 wrote:
Mar 13th, 2018 12:27 am
Hello All. This is not specifically hardwood flooring question but just wanted some opinions. Im choosing the finishes for my pre-construction condo and the option of Vinyl Composite Core or Engineered hardwood are both offered (no extra cost for either choice). They state that vinyl is easier for maintenance and won't scuff or expand due to water spills etc compared to engineered hardwood. Basically the salesperson was trying to sell us on the low maintenance so its better for rental units (I know that the cost to the builder will most likely also be cheaper if I get the vinyl option). I plan to live in this unit for 3/4 years at least and then maybe look at renting it out after. If you were in my shoes, would you go engineering hardwood or the Vinyl Composite Core?
The vinyl composite is definitely more durable than hardwood and easier to maintain. Therefore for rental might be a great choice. Some manufacturers make a great looking product but for resale engineered hardwood is preferred. The question is how is it going to look after few years of rental? As we know most don't really care about other's property.
The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread
Voted RFD "Most Helpful Thread of 2012"
__________________________________________________
If I helped in any way, please click the UpVote button or UpVote my Thread(s) :)
Member
Nov 18, 2003
324 posts
Hamilton
First of all patrob, kudos on this amazing thread.

We're doing a brand new build this year, approx 2600 sq ft of wood flooring. Want to stick to $5-6 /sqft. Have a quote on "Hardwood Planet" wire brushed solid red oak for $4.99. It's a fairly matte finish, cappucino colour (they'll do a custome colour for 29 cents more). Seems like a decent enough product. My question, anyone have a specific recommendation for something similar, in engineered or solid? Is there a go-to product that meets my specifications that would be better? I can't find a whole lot of info on this company, and I want to make sure we're making the right decision.
Feedback: Heatware | eBay | HoFo
[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Apr 17, 2005
10710 posts
1232 upvotes
Brampton
jessejericho wrote:
Mar 15th, 2018 2:27 pm
First of all patrob, kudos on this amazing thread.

We're doing a brand new build this year, approx 2600 sq ft of wood flooring. Want to stick to $5-6 /sqft. Have a quote on "Hardwood Planet" wire brushed solid red oak for $4.99. It's a fairly matte finish, cappucino colour (they'll do a custome colour for 29 cents more). Seems like a decent enough product. My question, anyone have a specific recommendation for something similar, in engineered or solid? Is there a go-to product that meets my specifications that would be better? I can't find a whole lot of info on this company, and I want to make sure we're making the right decision.
Sorry never heard of them. Must be a small company if they are only charging you 29 cents for a custom colour! Unfortunately don't have anything I can recommend at this price range. Just don't go with a wide plank in solid. You are building your own house, maybe splurge a little more since floors take the most abuse and this is not where you want to be saving money IMO.
The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread
Voted RFD "Most Helpful Thread of 2012"
__________________________________________________
If I helped in any way, please click the UpVote button or UpVote my Thread(s) :)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 6, 2008
1918 posts
319 upvotes
Milton, Ontario
I have question about laminate, maybe you have some input.
Panel 1 1845 x 244 x 10 mm
Panel 2 1845 x 188 x 12 mm

Is it better to pick 10mm thick, and 244mm wide, or 12mm thick, and 188mm wide panels .

Top