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The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread

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Oct 30, 2005
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patrob wrote:
The best suggestion is to insulate the cavity between ceiling and subfloor to the basement. There's no "magic" underlay that will make it quiet.
Would you say then there’s really no benefit to getting those underlayments that have better acoustic properties and to just stick with the basic felt type?
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Cyber0066 wrote:
Feb 8th, 2019 11:48 pm
Would you say then there’s really no benefit to getting those underlayments that have better acoustic properties and to just stick with the basic felt type?
Exactly but stick to regular wax paper, no need for anything else.
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Cyber0066 wrote:
Feb 8th, 2019 11:48 pm
Would you say then there’s really no benefit to getting those underlayments that have better acoustic properties and to just stick with the basic felt type?
If you are in a condo, you might be required to have a certain type of acoustic underlayment.
I'm not saying that the ratings aren't snake oil, but if you don't use the approved product, you might have to rip out the whole floor and start again.
And yes, I have seen it happen.
What if there were no hypothetical questions?
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Jucius Maximus wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 2:28 pm
If you are in a condo, you might be required to have a certain type of acoustic underlayment.
I'm not saying that the ratings aren't snake oil, but if you don't use the approved product, you might have to rip out the whole floor and start again.
And yes, I have seen it happen.
He's installing it on his main floor of the house but I agree with condos approved underlay is a must Thumbs Up Sign
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Hoping I can get some help on laminate please.

We are planning to buy the golden select in silverwood from Costco for our basement. Approx. 1100 sq ft.

Has anyone used this? Thoughts on the quality? It's 15mm thick.

The open area is a large L shape. How should the boards be laid?
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May 9, 2006
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Hi @patrob ,

Thanks again for your help and advice.

Another contractor recommends applying moister barrier (he said it's liquid form) on the OSB subfloor prior to engineered hardwood floor installation. Is it worth it?

Thanks again.
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Nov 17, 2007
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Hi patrob,

My mom's air conditioner in her condo leaked and the floor nearby was soaked. My mother, in her late 70's just cleaned up the water and didn't tell anyone. She also neglected to take any action to fix the air conditioner for almost a month. The ac was fixed. The floor (oak, herringbone pattern) has lifted and about 4 sq. ft. are loose and can easily be moved around. Her fix was to place a small rug over the area. This over a year ago.

I only found out on my last visit, when I felt the floor click as I walked over the rug.

The wood seems to have shrunk as not only are the pieces loose, there is a space between the pieces.
The floor underneath is concrete.

I'm thinking that some contact cement/glue laid down and the pieces replaced will do the job.

Any suggestion would be helpful.

Thanks in advance.
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umlowcn wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 8:49 pm
Hi @patrob ,

Thanks again for your help and advice.

Another contractor recommends applying moister barrier (he said it's liquid form) on the OSB subfloor prior to engineered hardwood floor installation. Is it worth it?

Thanks again.
No! Unless it's free but if you have to pay for it, don't waste your money.
The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread
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sam123 wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 9:22 am
Hi patrob,

My mom's air conditioner in her condo leaked and the floor nearby was soaked. My mother, in her late 70's just cleaned up the water and didn't tell anyone. She also neglected to take any action to fix the air conditioner for almost a month. The ac was fixed. The floor (oak, herringbone pattern) has lifted and about 4 sq. ft. are loose and can easily be moved around. Her fix was to place a small rug over the area. This over a year ago.

I only found out on my last visit, when I felt the floor click as I walked over the rug.

The wood seems to have shrunk as not only are the pieces loose, there is a space between the pieces.
The floor underneath is concrete.

I'm thinking that some contact cement/glue laid down and the pieces replaced will do the job.

Any suggestion would be helpful.

Thanks in advance.
You can re-glue individual pieces and no you cannot use contact cement. Mark the individual pieces where they go in place, take it off, clean the remaining glue from concrete and wood and you can use construction adhesive. But be careful not to get it on the good side of the floor (might be hard to remove). Otherwise you can use moisture cured adhesive but you have to find it at a professional flooring store. Comes in a tube, you will need a caulking gun.
The OFFICIAL Hardwood Flooring Thread
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Feb 8, 2019
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Personally, I hate carpet and love wood floors so I would pick wood and put the effort into keeping the rooms well ventilated for a while. We have installed 4 hardwood floors, all solid tongue and groove style that was finished professionally after installation.
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Feb 18, 2013
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Scarborough
Is it a bad idea to take engineered hardwood out of the box a week before it is installed? I want to go through and remove undesirable pieces... thanks
Newbie
Nov 8, 2016
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Hi Patrob, Thanks for your help and guidance on this forum.

I'm living in semi house which is 10 yrs old and has hardwood floor on main floor, 2nd flloor hallway (it is narrow strip about 2.5") but carpet (about 600 sqf) in all bedrooms and now Im looking at to replace that carpet with either hardwood floor or engineered wood floor. We don't have any kids < 10yrs. we also plan to sell this house in next 1-2 years. My budget is 5-6k

1:- Should I choose engineered wood or hardwood floor. don't want to go for cheap neither want to go beyond my budget.
2:- Would it be cheaper to buy the material by myself and then hire contractor to install it.
3:- Since our hallway has hardwood flr so do I have to replace that too as it very unlikely we will find it in store.
4:- Any suggestion where to shop around in Mississauga/Oakville/Toronto.

Appreciate your feedback on the above questions..
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cessnabmw wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 9:16 pm
Hoping I can get some help on laminate please.

We are planning to buy the golden select in silverwood from Costco for our basement. Approx. 1100 sq ft.

Has anyone used this? Thoughts on the quality? It's 15mm thick.

The open area is a large L shape. How should the boards be laid?
The thickness of the boards is irrelevant after a point. Above grade, it's an okay product.

My biggest issue with laminate below grade is water, and water vapour. As much as I hate to promote non-renewable flooring products, vinyl is a much better option in a basement. Even if you think your floor is 100% dry, concrete is an amazing sponge. Unless you can completely isolate the slab from the flooring, there will be problems. Laminate flooring is made from wood flour, and as such will behave like wood; rot and swell.

I've been down this road. Trust me, just install a quality vinyl floor.
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caddie444 wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2019 10:39 pm
Is it a bad idea to take engineered hardwood out of the box a week before it is installed? I want to go through and remove undesirable pieces... thanks
No it's not a bad idea, but really not necessary. The whole point of engineered flooring is that it is dimensionally stable, meaning it doesn't react to humidity changes like 'regular' hardwood does.
You shouldn't have to pick out undesirable pieces. The manufacturer has selected the best grain pattern ply for the top layer. There should be no undesirable pieces.
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patrob wrote:
Feb 20th, 2019 12:57 am
You can re-glue individual pieces and no you cannot use contact cement. Mark the individual pieces where they go in place, take it off, clean the remaining glue from concrete and wood and you can use construction adhesive. But be careful not to get it on the good side of the floor (might be hard to remove). Otherwise you can use moisture cured adhesive but you have to find it at a professional flooring store. Comes in a tube, you will need a caulking gun.
Thanked, as in No more nails or Gorilla con. adhesive?

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