Health & Wellness

Is it OK to let your dentist remove your wisdom teeth or better to go to a specialist? (oral surgeon)

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 23rd, 2018 2:23 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 17, 2010
1392 posts
144 upvotes

Is it OK to let your dentist remove your wisdom teeth or better to go to a specialist? (oral surgeon)

so my dentists recomends to remove my wisdom teeth. top 2 are full out. but one has decay on it since it chipped.

bottom left is partially out, and other one on right is underneath gums somewhere.

he x rayed my top teeth and said that he "could" remove them as the roots are relatively straight, but an orla surgeon would need to do the bottom two.

i think i want to leave the bottom two as they are brushable and no problems with them..yet.

so i was thinking of having my dentists put me on the chair , freeze my mouth and remove the top two.

would that be a good way to go? or cheaper then oral surgoen?

theres no health section on RFD so not sure where to post this lol
25 replies
Sr. Member
Jul 19, 2004
735 posts
94 upvotes
Vancouver
I'd go with an oral surgeon unless you know your dentist has extensive knowledge in doing it. Haven't had a positive review from friends that went to a regular dentist vs a surgeon.
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Mar 22, 2007
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Hamilton
Top 2 is really easy job.

But the bottom ones are more difficult as they grow sideways.
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Mar 23, 2008
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Why is this in “Home and Garden”?

C
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Sep 19, 2004
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Waterloo
It depends on the difficulty
Mine are all done by dentist, family member went to surgeon and full body sleep :P

if your insurance covers, just pick either? or ask oral surgeon to remove all at once after you go to sleep :)
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Deal Addict
Mar 14, 2006
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Toronto
I prefer Oral surgeon...Most dentist will refer you to the surgeon.... It can get complicated...
Deal Addict
Feb 8, 2015
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North York, ON
Wife had 2 removed. Dentist is a surgeon so he removed 1 (using him for over 30 yrs) but said it was better if he allowed a surgeon with the proper equipment to remove the other. Turned out well.
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
I had a dentist remove all 4 of my wisdom teeth when I was about 19 to help relieve headaches (which it did).
Mine were easy to remove, just freeze, and crack them out. One thing to insist regardless of who does it is for a post op xray to be sure no bits of tooth are left in the gums, which could lead to a serious infection. That happened to my uncle and he nearly died. It also happened to a friend of mine and was very ill for a few weeks.
Member
User avatar
Apr 10, 2011
420 posts
194 upvotes
Get an oral surgeon to do it. Get the general anesthesia too, if you can. My husband had his dentist do it and he was picking out shards of tooth from his gums for months after they were "removed". It was a traumatic experience for him....
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Jun 26, 2011
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magoot wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2018 4:57 pm
Dentist is a surgeon
All dentists are surgeons - D.D.S is literally Doctor of dental surgery.

That being said, the dentist probably wouldn't recommend it if he/she didn't feel confident. If the teeth are relatively straight, it's not much of an issue.
Newbie
Mar 7, 2011
35 posts
5 upvotes
I got my top 2 removed by my dentist at the time. As another RFD-er had mentioned, the tops are usually the easier ones. Then 1 year later, I had to go get my bottom one removed by an oral surgeon (specialist) cause it started to grow out and near nerves.

My advice? Do them all at once and with the specialist if you can - insurance pending? It's just easier to go through it once...
The experience with my dentist was fine, but it may not be for everyone. You're wide awake and you can hear and feel them cracking, picking, cutting, etc. Just be prepared.
With the oral surgeon (specialist), it felt like I was only in that chair for 5 minutes. The one downside between the specialist and my dentist - my dentist actually insists on using stitches that needed to be removed whereas the specialist used dissolvable. Not entirely sure if that makes a huge difference for you.
Newbie
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Mar 14, 2018
42 posts
11 upvotes
I would do the uppers with the GP dentist (it will cost you a lot less) and go see an oral surgeon or periodontist for the bottom 2. This will cost you a fair bit more. But both offer IV sedation if you need it.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 17, 2010
1392 posts
144 upvotes
kahkei wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2018 5:45 pm
I got my top 2 removed by my dentist at the time. As another RFD-er had mentioned, the tops are usually the easier ones. Then 1 year later, I had to go get my bottom one removed by an oral surgeon (specialist) cause it started to grow out and near nerves.

My advice? Do them all at once and with the specialist if you can - insurance pending? It's just easier to go through it once...
The experience with my dentist was fine, but it may not be for everyone. You're wide awake and you can hear and feel them cracking, picking, cutting, etc. Just be prepared.
With the oral surgeon (specialist), it felt like I was only in that chair for 5 minutes. The one downside between the specialist and my dentist - my dentist actually insists on using stitches that needed to be removed whereas the specialist used dissolvable. Not entirely sure if that makes a huge difference for you.
i assume they froze ur mouth when ur GP did it.

how long did it take to remove the upper 2?
Newbie
Mar 15, 2018
1 posts
I don't think it's a problem. My dentist successfully removed one and it was a dent incluse btw. But I suppose it depends on how bad your particular case is
Newbie
Mar 7, 2011
35 posts
5 upvotes
Oh yes, it was local anesthesia. The process...it also depends on how the tooth responds. If it is all clean and well - probably an hour or so for both uppers? I would anticipate 1.5 hrs to be on the safe side. But you can sometimes run into trouble with the dentist needing to crack the tooth into more than 4 pieces, or that it fragmented - meaning the dentist needs to go back in and really clean the open wound.... Let's just say I tried to remain calm, but I am 100% confident that my heart rate and blood pressure sore through the through at least twice (just the anxiety).

That's why I suggest doing all 4 at the same time with full anesthesia... I literally thought it was 5 minutes (which is impossible).

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