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Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4951 posts
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Chickinvic wrote:
Jan 9th, 2018 5:06 pm
I'm guessing they don't look like that lol.
Heck, I don't even care what s/he looks like. It's more the error in thinking that IF caused a certain look, kwim?
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Oct 1, 2011
5700 posts
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I, too, would like to see trucanuck's Greek statue body, preferably in David pose, partially clothed

for science
Deal Fanatic
Jun 29, 2010
7141 posts
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Toronto
for folks who are insulin resistant intermittent fasting could do them a world of good. omad isn't the only way to intermittent fast
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2016
2164 posts
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ShoNuff2 wrote:
Jan 9th, 2018 7:44 pm
for folks who are insulin resistant intermittent fasting could do them a world of good. omad isn't the only way to intermittent fast
or you could lose weight...
Deal Fanatic
Jun 29, 2010
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Toronto
toronto19850 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 9:58 am
or you could lose weight...
one can be insulin resistant even if they are not overweight.
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2016
2164 posts
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ShoNuff2 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 10:19 am
one can be insulin resistant even if they are not overweight.
you don't need to be overweight, to lose weight
Deal Fanatic
Jun 29, 2010
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Toronto
toronto19850 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 11:50 am
you don't need to be overweight, to lose weight
if someone is normal weight why should they lose weight? and losing weight on it's own may not solve the problem of insulin resistance.
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
Jr. Member
Apr 18, 2017
170 posts
73 upvotes
Many people discover intermittent fasting, low carb, keto etc. Through a desire to lose weight. Hence a lot of the information on the internet is an echo chamber around just that aspect alone.

However there are numerous disorders that respond to fasting, low carb, keto etc. (All similar mechanisms) that have been well researched and is well understood.

Without wanting to sound like a miracle cure snake oil salesman, it's benefits can range from asthma to psoriasis to arthritic disorders, lyme disease, neurological disorders of various kinds.... a very long list.
Some examples
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3946160/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3680567/

It turned my health around dramatically, reversing an "incurable" problem I'd had for years and giving me my life back.

no, I don't have a six pack. But then I don't associate good health with exceptionally low body fat or hypertrophy either.
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2016
2164 posts
648 upvotes
ShoNuff2 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 11:57 am
if someone is normal weight why should they lose weight? and losing weight on it's own may not solve the problem of insulin resistance.
why wouldn't losing weight solve insulin resistance?
Eating in a caloric deficit increases insulin sensitive, so does exercise.

and how would intermittent fasting help one that is insulin resistant? So that they can have larger spikes in blood sugar and then have high fasting blood sugars the rest of the day? Idiotic in my opinion.
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Jun 29, 2010
7141 posts
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toronto19850 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 2:45 pm
why wouldn't losing weight solve insulin resistance?
Eating in a caloric deficit increases insulin sensitive, so does exercise.

and how would intermittent fasting help one that is insulin resistant? So that they can have larger spikes in blood sugar and then have high fasting blood sugars the rest of the day? Idiotic in my opinion.
not sure why a self avowed junk food junky has taken such an interest in this but here's a start...
Can Normal Weight and Thin People Be Insulin Resistant?
...knock yourself out
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
Jr. Member
Apr 18, 2017
170 posts
73 upvotes
Long term caloric restriction can actually induce physiological insulin resistance to prevent the muscles from taking up the glycogen made by the liver that's meant for the brain.
Nonetheless, it's irrelevant to this discussion. I just point it out as an example to demonstrate that biochemistry is not an easy process to simplify.

Weight gain is a symptom of insulin resistance, not a cause.
So saying to someone if they lose weight, that it will reduce their insulin resistance, isn't going to be very helpful to them.

"Simply" put,
Intermittent fasting (or any method that keeps blood sugars low, ie. metformin, low carb ) helps by allowing the body to reduce insulin levels to the point where the cells start to shuttle triglycerides out of the fat cells to be used as energy by the muscles.

If you have eaten a standard high carb diet and many meals a day for a long time, your mitochondria will be inefficient at processing fat and it can take weeks to months to generate a new population of more optimised ones. This is the "fat adapted" or "metabolic flexibility" state being talked about.

100% right about spiking your blood sugars being bad news. Avoid eating high GI foods on a regular basis, eat them combined with GI lowering foods.
Once you are metabolically flexible, and not eating so often so as to maintain a constantly high blood sugar level, the resulting spike will be much much shorter, as there is room in the muscle tissue to uptake the bolus of sugar.
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2016
2164 posts
648 upvotes
qman23 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 3:17 pm
Long term caloric restriction can actually induce physiological insulin resistance to prevent the muscles from taking up the glycogen made by the liver that's meant for the brain.
Nonetheless, it's irrelevant to this discussion. I just point it out as an example to demonstrate that biochemistry is not an easy process to simplify.

Weight gain is a symptom of insulin resistance, not a cause.
So saying to someone if they lose weight, that it will reduce their insulin resistance, isn't going to be very helpful to them.

"Simply" put,
Intermittent fasting (or any method that keeps blood sugars low, ie. metformin, low carb ) helps by allowing the body to reduce insulin levels to the point where the cells start to shuttle triglycerides out of the fat cells to be used as energy by the muscles.

If you have eaten a standard high carb diet and many meals a day for a long time, your mitochondria will be inefficient at processing fat and it can take weeks to months to generate a new population of more optimised ones. This is the "fat adapted" or "metabolic flexibility" state being talked about.

100% right about spiking your blood sugars being bad news. Avoid eating high GI foods on a regular basis, eat them combined with GI lowering foods.
Once you are metabolically flexible, and not eating so often so as to maintain a constantly high blood sugar level, the resulting spike will be much much shorter, as there is room in the muscle tissue to uptake the bolus of sugar.
All the studies I've read where intermittent fasting helped improve insulin sensitivity also had weight loss as a result. Which could have just been done by decreasing food intake.

Also no one said weight gain was the cause of insulin resistance, simply a straw man argument
ShoNuff2 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 3:17 pm
not sure why a self avowed Mjunk food junky has taken such an interest in this but here's a start...
Can Normal Weight and Thin People Be Insulin Resistant?
...knock yourself out
I have an interest in nutrition, I like to keep a lean physique while eating junk food :) and part of that is keeping my insulin sensitivity high
Also that link has nothing to do with what I said which is "Losing weight increases insulin resistance" and to top it off if you even read the link you posted it says "
Preventing Insulin Resistance

One of the best ways to lower your risk for insulin resistance is regular exercise – resistance training and aerobic exercise. Research clearly shows exercise improves insulin sensitivity. Plus, it helps to reduce visceral abdominal fat, especially if you do high-intensity exercise.
Although...if I wanted to sound like a person that knows what he's talking about, I wouldn't try proving my point with a random page off google that anyone could write that has nothing to do with the topic. :facepalm:
Deal Fanatic
Jun 29, 2010
7141 posts
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Toronto
toronto19850 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 7:14 pm
All the studies I've read where intermittent fasting helped improve insulin sensitivity also had weight loss as a result. Which could have just been done by decreasing food intake.

Also no one said weight gain was the cause of insulin resistance, simply a straw man argument



I have an interest in nutrition, I like to keep a lean physique while eating junk food :) and part of that is keeping my insulin sensitivity high
Also that link has nothing to do with what I said which is "Losing weight increases insulin resistance" and to top it off if you even read the link you posted it says "

Although...if I wanted to sound like a person that knows what he's talking about, I wouldn't try proving my point with a random page off google that anyone could write that has nothing to do with the topic. :facepalm:
back to your old tricks again i see
Idiotic in my opinion
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
Jr. Member
Apr 18, 2017
170 posts
73 upvotes
toronto19850 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 7:14 pm

Also no one said weight gain was the cause of insulin resistance, simply a straw man argument
toronto19850 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 2:45 pm
why wouldn't losing weight solve insulin resistance?
I apologise if I misunderstood your why statement. I assumed you wanted an open discussion and to share information on the matter.

It's not straw man to directly answer a question asked,
And I have no interest in arguing with you.

Best
Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4951 posts
409 upvotes
qman23 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2018 12:04 pm
Many people discover intermittent fasting, low carb, keto etc. Through a desire to lose weight. Hence a lot of the information on the internet is an echo chamber around just that aspect alone.

However there are numerous disorders that respond to fasting, low carb, keto etc. (All similar mechanisms) that have been well researched and is well understood.

Without wanting to sound like a miracle cure snake oil salesman, it's benefits can range from asthma to psoriasis to arthritic disorders, Lyme disease, neurological disorders of various kinds.... a very long list.
Some examples
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3946160/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3680567/

It turned my health around dramatically, reversing an "incurable" problem I'd had for years and giving me my life back.

no, I don't have a six pack. But then I don't associate good health with exceptionally low body fat or hypertrophy either.
Do you have other links to show the benefits of IF in humans for those conditions? A lot of the research has been done in rodents in the links you provided.

I don't know what people's fascination is with 'six packs'. I agree with you--low body fat or having visible abs aren't an indicator of good health.

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