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One origin theory of the name Canada

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  • Jun 28th, 2018 9:55 pm
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One origin theory of the name Canada

For Canada Day

HOW CANADA OBTAINED ITS NAME.

-—-The origin of the word “Canada” is curious enough. The Spaniards visited that country previous to the French, and made particular search for gold and silver, and finding none often said among themselves, “Acá nada” (there is nothing here). The Indians, who watched closely, learned this sentence and its meaning.

The French arrived, and the Indians, who wanted none of their company, and supposed they also were Spaniards come on the same errand, were anxious to inform them in the Spanish sentence “Acá nada.” The French, who knew as little of Spanish as the Indians, supposed this incessantly-recurring sound was the name of the country, and gave it the name of Canada, which it has borne ever since.

Friend's Intelligencer, Vol XXXV
1878 -'79
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zinful wrote:
Jun 27th, 2018 6:44 pm
For Canada Day

HOW CANADA OBTAINED ITS NAME.

-—-The origin of the word “Canada” is curious enough. The Spaniards visited that country previous to the French, and made particular search for gold and silver, and finding none often said among themselves, “Acá nada” (there is nothing here). The Indians, who watched closely, learned this sentence and its meaning.

The French arrived, and the Indians, who wanted none of their company, and supposed they also were Spaniards come on the same errand, were anxious to inform them in the Spanish sentence “Acá nada.” The French, who knew as little of Spanish as the Indians, supposed this incessantly-recurring sound was the name of the country, and gave it the name of Canada, which it has borne ever since.

Friend's Intelligencer, Vol XXXV
1878 -'79
Hardly a new theory...

However,
The idea that the Spanish sailed this far north though... or saw much of Canada is for the most part a lot of speculation vs fact
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/ ... ploration/

I personally prefer, and stake a lot more “based on some element of truth” claim that Heritage Minutes has famously portrayed

Where Jacques Cartier when learning about the country thru exploration & contact with the First Nations often heard the word Kanada / Kanata
Which was native for settlement
He just adopted it into use
And when back in Europe, TPTB used it to refer to the country as a whole
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zinful wrote:
Jun 27th, 2018 7:16 pm
The source I provide is from 1879.
Closer to knowing what really happened.

There is also an earlier reference from 1833
from before Canada was Canada

https://books.google.ca/books?id=WkhQAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA445
Huh...

Ok the Cdn Encyclopedia confused you ...

So I provide from Wikipedia (which in the original has the appropriate footnotes for references)
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada
While a variety of theories have been postulated for the etymological origins of Canada, the name is now accepted as coming from the St. Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata, meaning "village" or "settlement".[12] In 1535, indigenous inhabitants of the present-day Quebec City region used the word to direct French explorer Jacques Cartier to the village of Stadacona.[13] Cartier later used the word Canada to refer not only to that particular village but to the entire area subject to Donnacona (the chief at Stadacona);[13] by 1545, European books and maps had begun referring to this small region along the Saint Lawrence River as Canada.[13]

From the 16th to the early 18th century "Canada" referred to the part of New France that lay along the Saint Lawrence River.[14] In 1791, the area became two British colonies called Upper Canada and Lower Canada collectively named the Canadas; until their union as the British Province of Canada in 1841.[15] Upon Confederation in 1867, Canada was adopted as the legal name for the new country at the London Conference, and the word Dominion was conferred as the country's title.[16] The transition away from the use of Dominion was formally reflected in 1982 with the passage of the Canada Act, which refers only to Canada. Later that year, the name of the national holiday was changed from Dominion Day to Canada Day.[17] The term Dominion is also used to distinguish the federal government from the provinces, though after the Second World War the term federal had replaced dominion.[18]
1535.

Canada was in many ways Canada long before 1833, let alone Confederation

EDIT / ADD -
Historians are still debating on whether the Spanish ever made it to Canada.
The Portuguese & The Basques... yes.
And for the record, their language is NOT Spanish.
So the whole idea of it being derived from a Spanish word / phrase ... highly unlikely.
If the Spanish had indeed made it here... there would be more evidence.
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I clearly said that this was " One origin theory of the name Canada"
- this implies there are other theories.

Remember that on first contact Jacques Cartier did not speak the native language and the natives did not speak French and so everyone was just guessing at what was being said.

Could word of the European explorers have traveled north over the previous 30 years? Most definitely.

I can easily imagine the natives saying to the invaders
"Leave, there is nothing here"

European propaganda would probably find it more desirable to interpret events as the natives saying:
"Welcome to our village (land), feel free to take what you want."
Last edited by zinful on Jun 28th, 2018 8:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
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The "official" Government site https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-herit ... anada.html
"The name “Canada” likely comes from the Huron-Iroquois word “kanata,” meaning “village” or “settlement.” In 1535, two Aboriginal youths told French explorer Jacques Cartier about the route to kanata; they were actually referring to the village of Stadacona, the site of the present-day City of Québec. For lack of another name, Cartier used the word “Canada” to describe not only the village, but the entire area controlled by its chief, Donnacona.".......
Best line I have heard in a very long time LOL "I don't argue....I educate." Anonymous
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You said "The name “Canada” likely comes from the Huron-Iroquois word “kanata,”

Likely implies UNcertainty.
So, you are promoting with certainty a theory that is uncertain.

"Likely" also is a result from "this is what we want to believe because it puts us in a better light"

As events were recorded by the Europeans - the recording is most likely quite biased.
Last edited by zinful on Jun 28th, 2018 9:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
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zinful wrote:
Jun 28th, 2018 8:45 am
You said "The name “Canada” likely comes from the Huron-Iroquois word “kanata,”

Likely implies certainty.
So, you are promoting with certainty a theory that is uncertain.

"Likely" also is a result from "this is what we want to believe because it puts us in a better light"

As events were recorded by the Europeans - the recording is most likely quite biased.
The whole paragraph is in quotes. Pete_Coach copied a paragraph from the Canada.ca website.
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[OP]
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BTW - in my post #7 I made a typo

It should read "Likely implies UNcertainty." or "Likely implies lack of certainty"

Even Canada.ca website is not making a claim with absolutely certainty
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zinful wrote:
Jun 28th, 2018 8:45 am
You said "The name “Canada” likely comes from the Huron-Iroquois word “kanata,”

Likely implies UNcertainty.
So, you are promoting with certainty a theory that is uncertain.

"Likely" also is a result from "this is what we want to believe because it puts us in a better light"

As events were recorded by the Europeans - the recording is most likely quite biased.
I didn't say a thing about origins of the word. What I did say is "The "official" Government site" along with the web address.
You need to calm down, mellow out. The origins are obviously lost in history. LOL
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zinful wrote:
Jun 28th, 2018 8:22 am
I clearly said that this was " One origin theory of the name Canada"
- this implies there are other theories.

Remember that on first contact Jacques Cartier did not speak the native language and the natives did not speak French and so everyone was just guessing at what was being said.

Could word of the European explorers have traveled north over the previous 30 years? Most definitely.

I can easily imagine the natives saying to the invaders
"Leave, there is nothing here"

European propaganda would probably find it more desirable to interpret events as the natives saying:
"Welcome to our village (land), feel free to take what you want."
This whole paragraph, makes no sense in a line of reasoning

First you say:

Remember that on first contact Jacques Cartier did not speak the native language and the natives did not speak French and so everyone was just guessing at what was being said.

Then...

I can easily imagine the natives saying to the invaders
"Leave, there is nothing here"


In SPANISH no less

And are assuming with this entire topic that the word Canada, originated from the Spanish word
“Acá nada” (there is nothing here”
Which the Natives were repeating over and over again to the French Explorers upon their arrival
After mimicing it from Spanish Explorers who also evidently said it over and over again

:facepalm:

Seriously, you actually find merit in this claim ?

When
(A) There is no definite proof the Spanish ever sailed as far north as The Maritimes, or

(B) Most Importantly, there is a KNOWN WORD in the Iroquois language Kanata / Kanada that means settlement ... and Jacques Cartier was known to have mingled heavily with the Natives and learned about their culture & language
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@PointsHubby Actually there may be some merit to the claim of the Spanish. Research the history of the Basque Whalers, mostly French Basque, however they are so close to the Spanish Basque I would give it some merit. The Basque were whalers and had a processing site on Iles Verte, just off the mainland at Trois Pistoles, P.Q. Locals, however make no real distinction from French to Spanish. The time period is early to mid 16th century. My knowledge is that my family originated in that area and I had been studying my heritage for some time.

That said I still go by the official government site that uses the aboriginal word "Kanata".
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rcmpvet wrote:
Jun 28th, 2018 3:08 pm
@PointsHubby Actually there may be some merit to the claim of the Spanish. Research the history of the Basque Whalers, mostly French Basque, however they are so close to the Spanish Basque I would give it some merit. The Basque were whalers and had a processing site on Iles Verte, just off the mainland at Trois Pistoles, P.Q. Locals, however make no real distinction from French to Spanish. The time period is early to mid 16th century. My knowledge is that my family originated in that area and I had been studying my heritage for some time.

That said I still go by the official government site that uses the aboriginal word "Kanata".
Good post.

I never disputed the Basques. There is strong documentation they came to Canada for Whaling & Fishing.
But... Basque (like the Portuguese who were also here) are cultures & languages onto themselves... and not Spanish
The phrase in Question... is Spanish

Sides... no way would either of these two, Basques or Portuguese say “Nothing Here” if they are busy making their fortunes off of the abundant marine life

At any rate... too much speculation / what ifs... in this whole idea as to how Canada got its name

When the Jacques Cartier & Iroquois Language theory draws pretty much a straight line connecting it all together

Kanata = Iroquois word for Village / Settlement
Jacques Cartier interacted with the Iroqois extensively
Cartier known to adopt / use the word in convos back in France
France begins to call this part of New France... Canada / the Canadas
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You are very correct in it being more of a culture as opposed to a language, as well as your other view points on this. That said "two great minds thinks alike". Smiling Face With Open Mouth
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