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Is an online Masters degree from University of London useless?

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Newbie
Apr 10, 2017
65 posts
11 upvotes
East York, ON

Is an online Masters degree from University of London useless?

I'm thinking of taking Masters degree from University of London, the online version since I can't fly to UK. Would employers find a masters degree that was completed online to be less valued than an in-campus masters degree? or does it not matter? I need to do it online, so that I can still keep my job (which is related to my field) and study on the side.

Also unlike some other online universities, this one has an actual campus, in the UK tho.
12 replies
Newbie
May 11, 2017
28 posts
10 upvotes
How would they know it's online? If it's a reputable university that exists in outside of only offering online courses they won't know unless you put 'ONLINE' on your resume
Deal Addict
Oct 20, 2002
1513 posts
47 upvotes
Mississauga
What's the program and actual college name? University is just a group the college belongs to. Those that know will probably ask. Also, everyone I know that graduated from a University of London college only refers to the college they graduated from. For example, if I'm from London School of Economics, you won't hear them say they graduated from university of london. I graduated from one of those colleges.

To most people here in Canada, probably no difference really. Just providing a different perspective just in case.

See list here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_London
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jul 12, 2003
8500 posts
1303 upvotes
Markham
Yes, employer would know and able to guess that it is an online Master.
Would that make a difference? Depending on the hiring manager...
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Member
Jul 31, 2017
235 posts
54 upvotes
zipperz wrote:
Oct 4th, 2017 1:49 pm
I'm thinking of taking Masters degree from University of London, the online version since I can't fly to UK. Would employers find a masters degree that was completed online to be less valued than an in-campus masters degree? or does it not matter? I need to do it online, so that I can still keep my job (which is related to my field) and study on the side.

Also unlike some other online universities, this one has an actual campus, in the UK tho.

The degree likely won't specify that it was done online.
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Dec 8, 2007
4620 posts
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Very (very) low value.
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Newbie
Mar 17, 2016
14 posts
3 upvotes
TodayHello wrote:
Dec 17th, 2017 11:05 pm
Very (very) low value.
What makes you say this? I'm working full time and deciding to do a masters either online or part time and I was considering the university of london
Banned
User avatar
Jun 8, 2008
3977 posts
1363 upvotes
Toronto
I think it entirely depends on the program. Personally, I couldn't imagine having done my Masters online, all of the depth and learning couldn't have been replicated in an online environment (I was working full time, did the degree part time). It would also depend on what you want out of it. If you just want the letters behind your name, then yeah, it'll get you there. If you want to actually learn the material in depth, and use the masters to further your career through networking etc. then maybe look at a more traditional school.
Newbie
Dec 19, 2015
78 posts
22 upvotes
Calgary, AB
Backing up Immortals comments. Which institution and which degree? Most of the colleges are good universities in their own right, but some are better than others (top 10 in the country for example). With a masters especially the reputation of the specific course may actually be more important than the reputation of the actual institution providing it, if you're planning on doing something directly related to an industry.

I'm also a University of London Masters graduate, but I don't mention the UoL, rather the college I actually went to. On the face of it a good course from a good university doesn't matter whether it's done online or in person, in fact I believe some employers see the distance learning courses in almost higher stead because they are usually done at the same time as being employed, so showing you can juggle multiple stressful tasks and have good time management.

You can also get an idea of the reputation of the specific college by looking it up here https://www.timeshighereducation.com/wo ... cols/stats

UCL for example is 15th and LSE is 25th in the world, but as mentioned, for an industry specific masters knowing the reputation of the specific course is more important.
Newbie
Mar 17, 2016
14 posts
3 upvotes
What is your opinion on SOAS for politics/public policy? SOAS is ranked pretty low (401-500) but it seems to have a good reputation to hose that know of it
Jr. Member
Sep 29, 2014
188 posts
124 upvotes
Toronto, ON
combatwombat69 wrote:
Dec 20th, 2017 12:13 pm
What is your opinion on SOAS for politics/public policy? SOAS is ranked pretty low (401-500) but it seems to have a good reputation to hose that know of it
Ok, to this question and zipperz original post, what do you want to DO with your degree? We need specificity here. A masters degree in social sciences is typically done for academic purposes. It's not going to help you a whole lot in the actual job market.
Newbie
Dec 25, 2012
49 posts
8 upvotes
Toronto
This online vs brick mortar reputation banter changes quickly when you start working in the industry. I work for a global consulting firm, and they could care less if you have an online degree. Once you step inside the door, your talent and performance rules your career. As you progress, the personality and networking prowess takes precedence.

I went to a Brick and Mortar school, and we have grads from Canadian, UK, and US schools; its nice to see the diversity in the team, and I am happy to say that we are evaluated on our work and not the paper we hold.

The reputation of your school probably matters the most for your first job. When you pay for Uoft, Harvard or a community college, you are primarily paying for the network. I am sure the quality of education probably is superior in the elite schools; however, I am not sure if a +$200k debt is worth it. Sure, if you have a scholarship, and the opportunity to attend these schools, I am sure its worth it.
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User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
1030 posts
126 upvotes
Markham, ON
Your master from the University of London will look good on any application but if I were to study, I would want to study on location and get the student experience. This is what I don't like about online studies. I don't like pulling all-nighters. I say, yes to sleep! I don't like last minute studying or deadline crunching. I always finish at least a week early and hand in assignment early.

anyways, pretending to be professors who like to go on tangents.

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