Politics, Religion & Controversial

Ontario reverting back to Sex Ed curriculum from 20 years ago for 2018-2019

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  • Sep 21st, 2018 2:37 pm
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Mar 13, 2018
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Ontario reverting back to Sex Ed curriculum from 20 years ago for 2018-2019

So I guess online luring and whole online/internrt/social media component and technology section and what sexual assault and abuse is has been taken out?

https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/canada/on ... -1.4009093

This is the repealed curriculum

Topics by grade

The following charts show what students will learn in the Healthy Living portion of their Health and Physical Education classes.

Sexual health education by grade

Below are more details on what students will learn about human development and sexual health (sex ed) and why these concepts are being taught at certain age levels.

Grade 1

Students will learn: * * to identify body parts by their proper names, including genitalia * about their senses and how they function * basic good hygiene habits (e.g. washing your hands, using tissues)

When children know the correct names of their body parts, they can communicate clearly and ask for help in case of illness, injury or abuse.

Grade 2

Students will learn:

• the basic stages of human development (e.g., infant, child, adolescent) and related body changes

• good hygiene habits for oral health (e.g., brushing your teeth, flossing, visiting the dentist regularly)

Before puberty, helping children to understand that their bodies will change (e.g., losing baby teeth) can help them communicate potentially unhealthy changes (e.g., pain) to a trusted adult.

Grade 3

Students will learn:

• about healthy relationships with peers and family (e.g., accepting differences, listening, mutual respect, honesty, open communication)

• how to overcome unhealthy aspects of relationships with others (e.g., bullying, peer pressure, being left out)

• about factors and habits that can affect physical and emotional development (e.g., safe environment, caring adults, feeling like you belong, sleep, food, physical activity)

• how visible differences (e.g., skin, hair and eye colour, clothing, physical ability) and invisible differences (e.g., learning abilities, cultural values and beliefs, gender identity, different family types such as one-parent, two-parent, two-mom or two-dad, grandparents, caregivers) make each person unique

• ways of showing respect for differences in others

As a foundation for healthy relationships later in life, students will learn about what makes them unique and different from others, and how to show respect for all.

Grade 4

Students will learn:

• the physical changes that happen during puberty, and the emotional and social impact these changes can have on a developing child

• how personal hygiene needs may change during puberty (e.g., the increased importance of regular bathing)

Today, children enter puberty earlier: on average, girls enter puberty between 8-13 years old and boys enter puberty between 9-14 years old. Learning about puberty before most students fully experience it helps prepare young people for changes in their bodies, emotions and social relationships.

Grade 5

Students will learn:

• to identify parts of the reproductive system, and how the body changes during puberty

• about the process of menstruation and sperm production

• to describe emotional and interpersonal stresses related to puberty

• to identify strategies to manage stress and enhance their emotional well-being and mental health

Puberty can be stressful, and helping students to understand changes in their bodies can help them cope. Students will also continue to learn the importance of showing respect for all, including those who may be entering puberty earlier or later than their peers.

Grade 6

Students will learn:

• about factors that may affect the development of a person’s understanding of themselves or personal identity (e.g., body image, stereotypes, self-awareness, cultural and gender identity)

• the physical, social and emotional changes that may occur in adolescence after the initial start of puberty (e.g., body growth, skin changes, increasing influence of peers, increased intensity of feelings) and how this impacts healthy relationships

• to make decisions in their personal relationships that show respect for themselves and others, including the importance of consent and clear communication

• how stereotypes, such as homophobia and assumptions about gender, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, culture and abilities, can affect how a person feels about themselves, their feelings of belonging and relationships with others

• appropriate ways to respond to and change assumptions and stereotypes

As children grow older and enter adolescence, understanding how the many changes happening in their lives may affect them and their peers helps build a healthy sense of who they are.

By Grade 6, students have developed some self-awareness and coping skills, and also learned critical thinking and reflective skills to solve problems and examine issues, which they will apply to learning about stereotypes and assumptions.

Through challenging these stereotypes and assumptions, they not only continue to learn respect for others, but also self-confidence in their own identity.

Grade 7

Students will learn:

• the importance of having a shared understanding with a partner about: delaying sexual activity until older, reasons for not becoming sexually active, the concept of consent and how to communicate consent, and the need to clearly communicate and understand decisions about sexual activity in a healthy relationship

• how to identify common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and describe their symptoms

• how to prevent STIs (including HIV) and unintended pregnancy, including delaying first intercourse and other sexual activities until they are older, and using condoms consistently if and when they become sexually active

• physical, emotional, social and psychological factors to consider when making sexual health decisions (e.g., STIs, pregnancy, side effects of contraception, social labelling, cultural teachings, gender identity, and impact on other relationships)

• how relationships with others and sexual health may be affected by physical and emotional changes in puberty and adolescence

Students need information and skills to make sound decisions about their health and well-being before they face a situation where they may need that information.

Teaching about sexual health and development does not increase sexual behaviour, and can actually prevent risky activity.

Grade 8

Students will learn about:

• factors that could affect someone’s ability to make safe and healthy decisions about sexual activity

• sources of support related to sexual health (e.g., parents, health professionals, in-school resources, local community groups, religious leaders, an elder)

• gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation, and how to identify factors that can help all young people to develop positive personal identities

Learning respect for their peers helps to ensure young people build positive, healthy understanding of themselves. Grades 9-12

Students are required to take one Health and Physical Education credit in high school. However, they may choose to continue to take additional course in other grades. These courses build on learning from Grades 1-8. See below for what students will learn in the in the Human Development and Sexual Health component of those courses.

Grade 9

Students will learn about:

• preventing STIs and unintended pregnancies and helpful sources of information and support (e.g., doctor, public health unit)

• gender identity and sexual orientation, and how different things like acceptance, stigma, stereotypes, self-awareness, culture, religion, and media can influence a person’s understanding of themselves

• how to build healthy relationships with peers, family members and potential romantic partners (e.g., honesty, open communication and respect)

• how to think in advance and to apply their knowledge of sexual health and safety, including consent and sexual limits

High school students are encouraged to think critically about the information they’ve learned about sexual health, in the same way they are encouraged to apply these same critical thinking skills to decisions about other things that impact their health like food choices, personal safety and fitness.

Students also continue to learn about the potential implications of online activities (e.g., texting and sending personal photos) and how to use electronic technologies appropriately.

Grade 10

Students will learn:

• how a variety of factors (e.g., their values/beliefs, what they see in media, setting and communicating limits) can influence a person’s decisions about sexual activity

• common misconceptions about sexuality in our culture, and to explain how these may cause harm to people and how they can be responded to critically and fairly

• how being in an exclusive romantic relationship with another person may affect them and their relationships with others

Providing information and opportunities to think, discuss and explore ideas helps students to understand and express their identity as it develops.

Grade 11

Students will learn:

• about mental health/illnesses and addictions, their causes and symptoms, and their effects on personal health and well-being

• how proactive health measures and supports (e.g., regular medical exams such as Pap tests) can minimize the risk of reproductive or sexual health problems

• how to use personal and interpersonal skills to deal with stress and help others in stressful situations (e.g., abusive relationships, illness, separation/divorce)

• the negative stigma sometimes associated with mental illness and ways to reduce it in their community

As students near the end of high school, they learn self-awareness and self-monitoring skills that help them to:

• understand their strengths and needs

• take responsibility for their actions

• monitor their own health progress and fitness goals

• continue to acquire health knowledge and apply it throughout their lifetime

451 replies
Deal Addict
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Jun 1, 2006
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:facepalm: ... Welcome to the 90's, courtesy of Doug Ford... let's go back to tackle sex ed before google, social media, sexting and same-sex marriage existed

Now proud Ford Nation members can celebrate by getting drunk and impregnating their wives
I swear to drunk I'm not God 😝
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Jan 5, 2003
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Election promise delivered. The cirriculum being changed was being taught 2 years ago actually, not reverting back 20 years. More false headlines, you people just can't help yourself. Now they will actually consult with parents on what they should be teaching kids.
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Flavour wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 2:40 pm
Election promise delivered. The cirriculum being changed was being taught 2 years ago actually, not reverting back 20 years. More false headlines, you people just can't help yourself. Now they will actually consult with parents on what they should be teaching kids.
Sex-ed curriculum from 1998 was updated 2 years ago to include several topics that didn't exist back then, plus, to inform the children in a professional way about several risks they can run into today (back in 1998 the internet was not so widely spread as it is now)

Douggie promised to revert the updated curriculum instated 2 years ago, for the one of 1998 that was being taught.

2018 - 1998 = 20

Should we also revise the math curriculum, so people can understand a simple subtraction?
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Jul 30, 2005
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Flavour wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 2:40 pm
Election promise delivered. The cirriculum being changed was being taught 2 years ago actually, not reverting back 20 years. More false headlines, you people just can't help yourself. Now they will actually consult with parents on what they should be teaching kids.
Oh -- 2 years ago there was brand new curriculum that was then replaced by the Wynne government?? Or, were they using curriculum written 20 years ago.

False math?
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roblombardi wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 2:45 pm
Sex-ed curriculum from 1998 was updated 2 years ago to include several topics that didn't exist back then, plus, to inform the children in a professional way about several risks they can run into today (back in 1998 the internet was not so widely spread as it is now)

Douggie promised to revert the updated curriculum instated 2 years ago, for the one of 1998 that was being taught.

2018 - 1998 = 20

Should we also revise the math curriculum, so people can understand a simple subtraction?
As I said this curriculum was being taught as recently as a couple years ago. I think kids were able to manage somehow :facepalm:

You people seem to keep referencing to it needing to be updated because of the internet. Had the pedophile who helped create this new curriculum stuck to just adding the internet and the government actually consulted parents there wouldn't be a problem.
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Flavour wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 3:00 pm
As I said this curriculum was being taught as recently as a couple years ago. I think kids were able to manage somehow :facepalm:

You people seem to keep referencing to it needing to be updated because of the internet. Had the pedophile who helped create this new curriculum stuck to just adding the internet and the government actually consulted parents there wouldn't be a problem.
Just adding "the internet" doesn't solve anything... the new curriculum needed to add open discussions with professionals about important issues, rather than leaving it to them to find out from the wrong sources

Why are some people afraid to let a prepared professional discuss sexuality with their kids?, do you think it's better they learn about those topics online, without the guidance of somebody who is prepared to talk about it and answers questions properly?
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Nov 15, 2004
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First he appoints some homeschooled shut-in religious fanatic to an educational role, now he caves in to the Islamic and Christian bloc by rolling back the sex ed curriculum so kids don't get taught about pedophiles or online harassment anymore. He's really trying hard to get that jihadi vote, isn't he?
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?
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Piro21 wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 4:04 pm
First he appoints some homeschooled shut-in religious fanatic to an educational role, now he caves in to the Islamic and Christian bloc by rolling back the sex ed curriculum so kids don't get taught about pedophiles or online harassment anymore. He's really trying hard to get that jihadi vote, isn't he?
Unfortunately, we all saw this coming, when Drouggie was elected PM... and more to come, folks, stay tuned!
I swear to drunk I'm not God 😝
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roblombardi wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 3:09 pm
Just adding "the internet" doesn't solve anything... the new curriculum needed to add open discussions with professionals about important issues, rather than leaving it to them to find out from the wrong sources

Why are some people afraid to let a prepared professional discuss sexuality with their kids?, do you think it's better they learn about those topics online, without the guidance of somebody who is prepared to talk about it and answers questions properly?
Yeah, I know some teachers, they are in no shape or form sexuality experts lol. They will just read the curriculum (as currently built by the convicted pedophile - oops I mean used to be built). And you make it sound like the class is full of responsible adults asking srs questions having a discussion. It's sex ed to teenagers (and now by popular progressive demand, pre-teens).

Maybe you should ask why you think there is only two options to discuss sex with kids, school or online. Is there a third option you can maybe think of?
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Flavour wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 4:50 pm
Yeah, I know some teachers, they are in no shape or form sexuality experts lol. They will just read the curriculum (as currently built by the convicted pedophile - oops I mean used to be built). And you make it sound like the class is full of responsible adults asking srs questions having a discussion. It's sex ed to teenagers (and now by popular progressive demand, pre-teens).

Maybe you should ask why you think there is only two options to discuss sex with kids, school or online. Is there a third option you can maybe think of?
LOL...parents do not teach their kids about sex education or even about consent. But most did not read the sex ed curriculum and listened the religious nut cases.
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maddawg wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 4:54 pm
LOL...parents do not teach their kids about sex education or even about consent. But most did not read the sex ed curriculum and listened the religious nut cases.
Where do you ever get that idea?
As far as I'm concerned, this is mostly a responsibility of the parents, not the school system.
That was the case with my parents and grandparents and also with out kids.

For sex education it's not one size fits all - some kids are ready earlier for certain aspects of that than others and the "education part" is often in response to questions, a specific sitation or scenario that has come up.
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Flavour wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 4:50 pm
Yeah, I know some teachers, they are in no shape or form sexuality experts lol. They will just read the curriculum (as currently built by the convicted pedophile - oops I mean used to be built). And you make it sound like the class is full of responsible adults asking srs questions having a discussion. It's sex ed to teenagers (and now by popular progressive demand, pre-teens).

Maybe you should ask why you think there is only two options to discuss sex with kids, school or online. Is there a third option you can maybe think of?
You keep repeating an error.

Ben Leven worked on the failed 2010 cirriculum, not the 2015 curriculum.

And it's not like it matters anyway. There are literally hundreds of people who contribute to the development of school curriculum, so any one person's contributions won't be all that significant.

When challanged, people like you don't point to any specific point in the curriculum that they don't think should be taught, they simply assert that it would be better taught at home. Well, go for it. Then the kids who don't get taught anything will still learn about these important concepts, and your kids will learn it twice. And if you actually don't want your kid to learn these things from a teacher, you can pull them out.

There are absolutley no losers with the current curriculum. There will be when the dangers of child luring and "sexting" will no longer be taught.
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krs wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 6:19 pm
Where do you ever get that idea?
As far as I'm concerned, this is mostly a responsibility of the parents, not the school system.
That was the case with my parents and grandparents and also with out kids.

For sex education it's not one size fits all - some kids are ready earlier for certain aspects of that than others and the "education part" is often in response to questions, a specific sitation or scenario that has come up.
My parents, who were the same sort of religious fundamentalists who would be writting letters and attending rallys if I was in school in modern day Ontario, didn't teach me anything. And they pulled me out when it was taught in school. I learned distorted versions from friends as there was no internet at the time.

There's nothing wrong with the current curriculum, and there's no reason not to teach sexual health at school. Parents are more than welcome to repeat or suppliment it, hopefully many do.

Rolling back the curriculum just serves the interests of people who want to deny this valuable instruction from other people's kids, since fundamentalists can already pull thier own kids.

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