Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Opening a restaurant (would like opinions on location)

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 14th, 2017 3:09 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 17, 2012
24 posts
TORONTO

Opening a restaurant (would like opinions on location)

Hey guys I’m doing some research because I’m thinking of opening a restaurant in the area, I saw two locations (1 is west on bloor, other is east on bloor)
I know I had to do demographic studies,etc...
But I really want to know what people think about the area?
Would you travel there to eat?
Do you normally go there?
Is it inconvenient to reach?

Both stores I’m looking it at two blocks in either directions from the subway.

Thanks for your opinions!
19 replies
Jr. Member
Oct 27, 2012
199 posts
99 upvotes
Shwa
What kind of restaurant is it? What kind of competition do you have in the area? Why will people buy your food instead of theirs?
Jr. Member
Dec 15, 2015
153 posts
66 upvotes
Toronto
Asking RFD is not smart. If your food is good people will bypass anything to go there. Look at Sotto Sotto. Its really in a weird location, but its a hot spot.

Who are you marketing too? High end, middle class, grab and go? Open early, open late? Some places are open 3 hours a day and clear 6 figures with lunch rush.
Considering a patio? What's your specialty? Those are the things I'd consider if I'd go somewhere. Not if it's an extra 2 mins from the subway or not. Is parking an option? Most higher end clientele like to take their cars with them to dinner.

It's Toronto, there's literally millions of people, I think you're worried about the wrong things. If your menu is good, people will come. We travel upto an hour sometime more to hit our favorite spots.
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
11046 posts
2269 upvotes
Prolly one of the toughest businesses to make more than your own modest salary, if that, not to mention having to work 16 hr days.
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
6141 posts
2226 upvotes
Toronto
TheMaterial wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 9:01 am
Asking RFD is not smart. If your food is good people will bypass anything to go there. Look at Sotto Sotto. Its really in a weird location, but its a hot spot.

Who are you marketing too? High end, middle class, grab and go? Open early, open late? Some places are open 3 hours a day and clear 6 figures with lunch rush.
Considering a patio? What's your specialty? Those are the things I'd consider if I'd go somewhere. Not if it's an extra 2 mins from the subway or not. Is parking an option? Most higher end clientele like to take their cars with them to dinner.

It's Toronto, there's literally millions of people, I think you're worried about the wrong things. If your menu is good, people will come. We travel upto an hour sometime more to hit our favorite spots.
I am sorry, but this is probably the worst advice I've read on the business forum. Like terrible. "if u build it, they will come" approach does not really work for restaurant business unless you are a famous chef.... This attitude might work if you were Gordon Ramsey, but even then, go check out the location of all of Gordon Ramseys restaurants, they are definitely not in the middle of nowhere.

foot traffic, mall traffic, car traffic, parking accessbility, and proximity to dense popluation areas will have a HUGE impact on your store.

As for the original post, it's vague... Which area Bloor West? do u mean bloor west village? do u mean dufferin and bloor? do you mean bathurst and bloor?
Which area Bloor East? dou mean parliament and bloor? Bay and bloor??



This is a widely different locations, with varying demographics.
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
6141 posts
2226 upvotes
Toronto
eonibm wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 5:39 pm
Prolly one of the toughest businesses to make more than your own modest salary, if that, not to mention having to work 16 hr days.
agreed
Deal Fanatic
Sep 16, 2004
6842 posts
730 upvotes
Toronto
Is it ethnic food? who is your target market? the snobs of Toronto or the economic gogetters of RFD. We have lot's of snobs on RFD too.:(
Is it close to a school for guaranteed sales?Competition in the area?
Sit down or just takeout or both?
Bloor is good because of public transit but there is already a host of food stores along Bloor already so also competitive.
This includes same and similar food stores within meters of a competitor.
For example the Shwarma place at Jane subway and then just a few steps away another one just East.
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
11046 posts
2269 upvotes
daivey wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 8:25 am
I am sorry, but this is probably the worst advice I've read on the business forum. Like terrible. "if u build it, they will come" approach does not really work for restaurant business unless you are a famous chef.... This attitude might work if you were Gordon Ramsey, but even then, go check out the location of all of Gordon Ramseys restaurants, they are definitely not in the middle of nowhere.

foot traffic, mall traffic, car traffic, parking accessbility, and proximity to dense popluation areas will have a HUGE impact on your store.

As for the original post, it's vague... Which area Bloor West? do u mean bloor west village? do u mean dufferin and bloor? do you mean bathurst and bloor?
Which area Bloor East? dou mean parliament and bloor? Bay and bloor??



This is a widely different locations, with varying demographics.
Not true. Mildred Pearce was a restaurant that opened on Sudbury St in the west end near Queen (since moved). They became one of the most successful independent restaurants in Toronto over a 20 year period in that location yet they were unknowns with no signature chef, were in a low-density area, had a hard-to-find address and location, absolutely no foot traffic, almost no parking and no advertising. They didn't even take reservations because they were always so incredibly busy.
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
6141 posts
2226 upvotes
Toronto
eonibm wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 12:14 pm
Not true. Mildred Pearce was a restaurant that opened on Sudbury St in the west end near Queen (since moved). They became one of the most successful independent restaurants in Toronto over a 20 year period in that location yet they were unknowns with no signature chef, were in a low-density area, had a hard-to-find address and location, absolutely no foot traffic, almost no parking and no advertising. They didn't even take reservations because they were always so incredibly busy.
I agree but I also disagree.

You're talking Queen West, and basically the central area of where hipster Toronto evolved from. That entire strip of queen west is hipster... Drake hotel. Gladstone, Caddilac lounce, rhino. That spot was a calculated spot for the "in" people. So while its a block from Queen St., it's not in the middle of nowhere. And sure they developed a reputation and grew out of that. But youre talking the exception and not the rule. They also had niche items. mildreds temple, which is what i believe its moved onto essentially specialises in fancy branches.. they are catering to a niche crowd and demographic, in a niche area that caters to that group of people.

so youre not wrong, but the OP didn't strike me as someone that was going to open a gem.
Jr. Member
Dec 15, 2015
153 posts
66 upvotes
Toronto
daivey wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 8:25 am
I am sorry, but this is probably the worst advice I've read on the business forum. Like terrible. "if u build it, they will come" approach does not really work for restaurant business unless you are a famous chef.... This attitude might work if you were Gordon Ramsey, but even then, go check out the location of all of Gordon Ramseys restaurants, they are definitely not in the middle of nowhere.
LOL its really not, and thanks to the internet area you can be a no body and thrive with a great menu. Maybe 10 even 5 years ago, sure you'd have to do months and months of leg work, but today you really don't. The guys who know how to use twitter and Instagram and take advantage of the widely followed blogs can be successful in very obscure areas of the city.
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
6141 posts
2226 upvotes
Toronto
TheMaterial wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 9:11 pm
LOL its really not, and thanks to the internet area you can be a no body and thrive with a great menu. Maybe 10 even 5 years ago, sure you'd have to do months and months of leg work, but today you really don't. The guys who know how to use twitter and Instagram and take advantage of the widely followed blogs can be successful in very obscure areas of the city.
how many restaurants do u see doing that successfully?

people travel for niche food, not run of the mill basic stuff.. OP hasn't explained what he is doing, who he caters. what his food is. etc
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 15, 2015
171 posts
28 upvotes
Markham, ON
Dear OP, it would be helpful to see the exact location. The price of your menu.

Thank you for your broad information.

For example, which subway station are you talking about?
Jr. Member
Dec 15, 2015
153 posts
66 upvotes
Toronto
daivey wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 9:14 pm
how many restaurants do u see doing that successfully?

people travel for niche food, not run of the mill basic stuff.. OP hasn't explained what he is doing, who he caters. what his food is. etc
I see quite a few, however success is measured differently based on the person. My wife also drags me all around to try new places.

Ultimately you're right, as OP does not provide enough information.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
4659 posts
844 upvotes
Markham
If OP serves food/service as quick as he answers questions to his original request, he's in trouble before he starts. Just sayin.

Interesting read on opening a restaurant below.

https://torontolife.com/food/restaurant-ruined-life/
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!

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