Food & Drink

Opinion on restaurants with tipping % options on 15/20/25% instead of 10/15/20%?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 12th, 2019 8:40 pm
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Jun 11, 2005
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AndySixx wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 12:21 am
Or just avoid eating out, make a nice dinner at home, and tip 0%.

I just about always tip over 20%, my last tip on a $130 meal was $50, but I've increasingly been seeing restaurants screwing employees and trying to force mandatory tipping plus tip shame. The article writer is obviously a former service sector employee.. if the idea is that I should spend my time going at it with a manger for bad service like this is McDonalds because people feel entitled to tip for shoddy service, I'd just rather avoid the scene entirely.
I hope the service and food was exceptional to leave that big a tip. It was almost 40% you must have an expense account or get paid way too much. lol
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burnt69 wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 11:23 pm
But in Canada, income taxes are much higher on the money that they earn. So it balances out.
Maybe that is why they don't report their tips on their tax returns:

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/tax-crackd ... s-1.870411
OTTAWA - A blitz by Canada Revenue Agency auditors on an unfortunate group of waiters and waitresses in one Ontario community has exposed "very surprising" amounts of unreported tips and gratuities.

The pilot project targeted 145 servers working in just four restaurants in St. Catharines, Ont., a blue-collar city on the Niagara Peninsula, south of Toronto.

Auditors reviewed two years' worth of income and found that every individual had hidden some portion of their tips from the taxman, with about half reporting no tips whatsoever.

In the end, the blitz flushed out $1.7 million in unreported tips and gratuities -- almost $12,000 for each person.
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eonibm wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 8:58 pm
I agree. One should tip less on larger tables as it's much less work. Fewer trips to the kitchen, you can ask everyone how they are enjoying their meal all at once, you can carry more plates on one trip vs a table for 2, etc.
Bigger tables are NOT less work...
Take a table of 10, no server is going to be able to take out 10 main dishes on their own, let alone clear a table of 10 solo.
Trying to get the attention of a large party is next to impossible, granted you may only need to ask 2x how things are, but it's certainly not less work. For example, people have all sorts of (alleged) allergies that need to be taken into account.
Things are even nuttier (along w/ the guests in most cases) when you get into fine dining.
Ideally servers have help (server assistants) and those are the ones that just carry food and remove your plates.

15% is fine by me, if the service is good. 18-20% would have to mean the service is exceptional as in you gave me free booze or something along the same lines.
As a server 20% is great of course!

I wonder how many people here have actually worked in a restaurant. Having said that though, I do wish tipping was done away with. Just increase the prices and let's be done w/ it...
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Nov 7, 2012
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eonibm wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 7:27 pm
20% is the new normal

Says who? I tip 15% pre-tax if the service is good, if it's so-so 10% and if bad ZERO!
I just give an automatic loonie and pile of nickels to make it 'look' big
blahhh
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Aug 2, 2010
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webdoctors wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 11:20 pm
I'm similar (15 in Canada, 20 in USA but its before tax). In USA they need to buy their own health insurance.
Not if you eat at Starbucks as even part-time employees get health insurance there.
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IceBlueShoes wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 6:45 am
Bigger tables are NOT less work...
Take a table of 10, no server is going to be able to take out 10 main dishes on their own, let alone clear a table of 10 solo.
Trying to get the attention of a large party is next to impossible, granted you may only need to ask 2x how things are, but it's certainly not less work. For example, people have all sorts of (alleged) allergies that need to be taken into account.
Things are even nuttier (along w/ the guests in most cases) when you get into fine dining.
Ideally servers have help (server assistants) and those are the ones that just carry food and remove your plates.

15% is fine by me, if the service is good. 18-20% would have to mean the service is exceptional as in you gave me free booze or something along the same lines.
As a server 20% is great of course!

I wonder how many people here have actually worked in a restaurant. Having said that though, I do wish tipping was done away with. Just increase the prices and let's be done w/ it...
Wrong! I was a waiter way back in my university days. I loved it when I got big tables as it was so much less work to serve, say, a table of 10 people than 5 tables of 2 people each.

I never had a problem getting the attention of the table. Waiters who can't just don't know how to. That doesn't mean you need to tip more because they don't know how to do their job, now does it?

I can carry 4 dishes out at a time. So for a table of ten that's a max of 3 trips vs 5 trips for 5 tables of 2. For a table of 8 that's 2 trips vs 4 trips for 4 tables of 2 each, but anyway, I think you get the basic arithmetic now. Also, instead of going to 4-5 different areas of the restaurant to serve those individual tables of 2 you are only going to one place. Again, much easier. Any waiter who can't carry 4 dishes at a time needs to hand in their waiter card. Again, you don't need to compensate for that by providing a bigger tip.

I guess you've never done the job so you don't have a clue. People need to stop spreading this 'larger tables are more work' fake news.
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Dec 31, 2005
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No it is not the new normal.

One important point of reference is through the expense policy for most companies. If you read them, many will indicate a maximum of 15% for any gratuity or the bill cannot be reimbursed without additional levels of approvals.
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eonibm wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 10:36 am
Wrong! I was a waiter way back in my university days. I loved it when I got big tables as it was so much less work to serve, say, a table of 10 people than 5 tables of 2 people each.

I never had a problem getting the attention of the table. Waiters who can't just don't know how to. That doesn't mean you need to tip more because they don't know how to do their job, now does it?

I can carry 4 dishes out at a time. So for a table of ten that's a max of 3 trips vs 5 trips for 5 tables of 2. For a table of 8 that's 2 trips vs 4 trips for 4 tables of 2 each, but anyway, I think you get the basic arithmetic now. Also, instead of going to 4-5 different areas of the restaurant to serve those individual tables of 2 you are only going to one place. Again, much easier. Any waiter who can't carry 4 dishes at a time needs to hand in their waiter card. Again, you don't need to compensate for that by providing a bigger tip.

I guess you've never done the job so you don't have a clue. People need to stop spreading this 'larger tables are more work' fake news.
actually I have but sounds like your place was casual as opposed to something more upscale with numerous courses.
Of course that would explain why you could make multiple trips. It's frowned up where I've worked(personally I don't see the big deal but people suck). People often complain about the stupidest crap.

And I never said you need to tip more, just that bigger tables are more work for the most part, which is why you ask the assistants or fellow servers for help. No need to try to show off and spill everything.
I'm looking for a NZ Silver Fern Kiwi coin! :)
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Jul 7, 2007
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In most Chinese restaurants in Toronto, I don't tip because the service is absolutely garbage.

Was at Kaka this past Saturday with a table of 8. Waited over 1 hour for our order of sashimi to arrive and I followed up on this 4 times with the server. We arrived at 6:00pm and at 7:15pm the server said it was last call for our table, clearly wanting us to leave so they can get the next customers lined up into our seats.

Argued with the manager at the end and she removed the 15% tip that was automatically added to our bill.
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CheapScotch wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 5:56 am
Maybe that is why they don't report their tips on their tax returns:

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/tax-crackd ... s-1.870411
OTTAWA - A blitz by Canada Revenue Agency auditors on an unfortunate group of waiters and waitresses in one Ontario community has exposed "very surprising" amounts of unreported tips and gratuities.

The pilot project targeted 145 servers working in just four restaurants in St. Catharines, Ont., a blue-collar city on the Niagara Peninsula, south of Toronto.

Auditors reviewed two years' worth of income and found that every individual had hidden some portion of their tips from the taxman, with about half reporting no tips whatsoever.

In the end, the blitz flushed out $1.7 million in unreported tips and gratuities -- almost $12,000 for each person.
Thank you for posting this.

I made a similar comment on another tipping topic, how I had heard about Waiters being audited, and caught for not reporting tips (tax evasion)

At the time many RFD Members said it was not possible / happening. Clearly it was / is. The Waiter that I heard of worked for a chain Restaurant (one quite prominent in NF)... Altho that wasn't where he was employed. Figure now that Rev Can got lucky in NF and is now auditing that whole chain.
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PointsHubby wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 12:38 pm
Thank you for posting this.

I made a similar comment on another tipping topic, how I had heard about Waiters being audited, and caught for not reporting tips (tax evasion)

At the time many RFD Members said it was not possible / happening. Clearly it was / is. The Waiter that I heard of worked for a chain Restaurant (one quite prominent in NF)... Altho that wasn't where he was employed. Figure now that Rev Can got lucky in NF and is now auditing that whole chain.
Of all the people, I wouldn't be worried about gratuity workers not reporting tips. They're overwhelmingly making shit money anyways. A lot of bigger fish to fry involving a lot more taxable income/investments/gains.
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AndySixx wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 1:28 pm
Of all the people, I wouldn't be worried about gratuity workers not reporting tips. They're overwhelmingly making shit money anyways. A lot of bigger fish to fry involving a lot more taxable income/investments/gains.
I certainly don't worry about what anyone else makes, or does with their money.

I was just stating a FACT ... Revenue Canada seems to have bit onto a highly unreported income stream
(for all the RFDers here who clearly believe that not reporting or under reporting tips is an ok practice... Clearly there are real risks)

As for crappy wages in the Service Industry...

Ya for the most part that is true, as most Cdns don't make a career of waiting tables / service jobs, but catch hours here & there where they can to complement whatever else they have going on (school - interning - pursuing their dreams)

By contrast those who work regular wekly shifts, can & do make good money when one takes in both salary & tips... Crazy good money... Which is exactly why you see more mature (age wise) Waiters & Bartenders holding court on the weekend shifts. It was one of these fellows that I knew who got reemed by Rev Canada... At 40, he clearly had a lot to lose, as they quickly figured out he had not been claiming tips for years & years (personally, I think that was his first mistake... Not under reporting, but essentially reporting nothing)

Surprisingly as the linked article says... That is far more common than one would imagine, where about half of those investigated reported $ 0 for tips
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PointsHubby wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 2:43 pm
I certainly don't worry about what anyone else makes, or does with their money.

I was just stating a FACT ... Revenue Canada seems to have bit onto a highly unreported income stream
(for all the RFDers here who clearly believe that not reporting or under reporting tips is an ok practice... Clearly there are real risks)

As for crappy wages in the Service Industry...

Ya for the most part that is true, as most Cdns don't make a career of waiting tables / service jobs, but catch hours here & there where they can to complement whatever else they have going on (school - interning - pursuing their dreams)

By contrast those who work regular wekly shifts, can & do make good money when one takes in both salary & tips... Crazy good money... Which is exactly why you see more mature (age wise) Waiters & Bartenders holding court on the weekend shifts. It was one of these fellows that I knew who got reemed by Rev Canada... At 40, he clearly had a lot to lose, as they quickly figured out he had not been claiming tips for years & years (personally, I think that was his first mistake... Not under reporting, but essentially reporting nothing)

Surprisingly as the linked article says... That is far more common than one would imagine, where about half of those investigated reported $ 0 for tips
What you say is logical, I'm not challenging any factual basis of what you stated (I'm sure I could find plenty wrong with it if I had the time but I actually agree), and I don't doubt there's an abundance of bottom feeding service sector tax evaders there but we're talking about utterly low wage income earners... people likely who'd get back all their tax money anyways. Not lucrative for the government, nor sensible, since this is at the behest of management anyways. Such paltry amounts compared to wealthier evaders. Would be better to start at the top and work toward the bottom. All about strategy with finite resources, and of course, a desire to change outcomes.
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The amount of tip IMO is inversely proportional to the increases in the minimum wage. As minimum wages for servers increase, tip amounts go down with the argument being that tipping was only ever a means to give minimum wage workers a "living wage".

Alberta now has the highest minimum wage in the country at $13.60/hour (over 30% increase in the last few years) so the need for supplementing the income of servers has now decreased ergo lower tipping now applies.

The transition period, while my fellow Albertans come to terms with higher restaurant prices and the reasons for it, is good for servers who have not only seen their wages increased but consumers continuing to tip at the "old" rates.
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Conquistador wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 3:01 pm
The amount of tip IMO is inversely proportional to the increases in the minimum wage. As minimum wages for servers increase, tip amounts go down with the argument being that tipping was only ever a means to give minimum wage workers a "living wage".

Alberta now has the highest minimum wage in the country at $13.60/hour (over 30% increase in the last few years) so the need for supplementing the income of servers has now decreased ergo lower tipping now applies.

The transition period, while my fellow Albertans come to terms with higher restaurant prices and the reasons for it, is good for servers who have not only seen their wages increased but consumers continuing to tip at the "old" rates.
It's interesting if these AB hikes affect tipped employment.

That's when you can really differentiate from the businesses operating efficiently and not, partly due to the fact that most of their service related labor was covered by customers via tips.

One of the biggest reasons for failure anyways for businesses like this is due to fiscal incompetence with variable costs. Though this is more an issue with small businesses as they're more likely to suffer from prideful owners instead of delegated management.

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