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  • Dec 5th, 2017 6:19 am
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Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2008
759 posts
134 upvotes
Markham
b166er1337 wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2010 11:10 pm
Or be self-employed or start a business. But honestly, anyone who opts out of EI is short-sighted.
not for those of us who are ambitious, hire-able, have cash reserves, or a bank of mom & dad. I realize much of the population don't fall into any of the mentioned categories, but then at the very least, having the choice of opting out would be nice. Why not leave it to the people who opt out to 'regret' their decision, right?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
4977 posts
2473 upvotes
Edmonton
If only high risk people were to opt in for the program and everyone else opted out, the rates would go through the roof. That's not the way social programs function.

C
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4863 posts
937 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
unowned wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 5:06 am
not for those of us who are ambitious, hire-able, have cash reserves, or a bank of mom & dad. I realize much of the population don't fall into any of the mentioned categories, but then at the very least, having the choice of opting out would be nice. Why not leave it to the people who opt out to 'regret' their decision, right?
That's my rationale as well. It's like me choosing not to put collision insurance on my older vehicles. Well if something happens and I'm at fault. Tough luck. But I saved money for that to happen.

I pay a pretty penny of EI but hardly ever draw from it. The longest period of consecutive unemployment in my entire working career has been 3 weeks. If by any unfortunate circumstance I'm out of work for 6+ months. I have savings for that.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7820 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
unowned wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 5:06 am
not for those of us who are ambitious, hire-able, have cash reserves, or a bank of mom & dad. I realize much of the population don't fall into any of the mentioned categories, but then at the very least, having the choice of opting out would be nice. Why not leave it to the people who opt out to 'regret' their decision, right?
Why are people so ambitious and hireable so concerned about a $900/year safety net? Opting out isn't part of how group insurance policy works. I'd expect ambitious people that are so hireable to understand that basic principle.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1465 posts
449 upvotes
FirstGear wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 8:32 am
That's my rationale as well. It's like me choosing not to put collision insurance on my older vehicles. Well if something happens and I'm at fault. Tough luck. But I saved money for that to happen.

I pay a pretty penny of EI but hardly ever draw from it. The longest period of consecutive unemployment in my entire working career has been 3 weeks. If by any unfortunate circumstance I'm out of work for 6+ months. I have savings for that.
Two weeks of payment on EI is more than a whole year of contributions.

I would say it's a bargain if you ever need it and don't understand why people would want to drain all of their savings just in order to save peanuts on the premiums.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
2107 posts
347 upvotes
Edmonton
I don't see why you guys are complaining. The max ei premium is only $836 and max insure earnings is 51k. So for you guys that apparently put "thousands" each year is bull.
So for a measly $836 you are guaranteed a steady income unless you lost your job and it's your fault.

Don't like it? Go self employed/sub contractor or move!
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
10166 posts
590 upvotes
Does all of Canada allow you to collect EI for parental/maternity leave? Or is that just ontario?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7820 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
slowtyper wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 1:59 pm
Does all of Canada allow you to collect EI for parental/maternity leave? Or is that just ontario?
EI is a federal program
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
1073 posts
453 upvotes
tmkf_patryk wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 5:12 pm
I don't see why you guys are complaining. The max ei premium is only $836 and max insure earnings is 51k. So for you guys that apparently put "thousands" each year is bull.
So for a measly $836 you are guaranteed a steady income unless you lost your job and it's your fault.

Don't like it? Go self employed/sub contractor or move!
The current figure is 955.04$. But even then, if one is allowed to opt out, this 955$ will only translate to something around 600$ a year, post tax.
Newbie
Nov 28, 2017
1 posts
I would opt out if I could. I am a Catholic priest so I will pay EI. my whole life, and would only be able to collect if the Church decides that we have too many priests and decided to start lay offs; which has never happened in 2000 years.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1465 posts
449 upvotes
FrGreg wrote:
Nov 29th, 2017 10:26 pm
I would opt out if I could. I am a Catholic priest so I will pay EI. my whole life, and would only be able to collect if the Church decides that we have too many priests and decided to start lay offs; which has never happened in 2000 years.
But I’m sure you already know that EI benefits aren’t only for being laid off, right?
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2013
760 posts
255 upvotes
OTTAWA
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
Nov 30th, 2017 3:21 am
But I’m sure you already know that EI benefits aren’t only for being laid off, right?
I am pretty sure he won't be getting paternity benefits either.

Basically EI is a tax. If you are a student you are ineligible but still pay into it. If you have a guaranteed job you still pay into it. If you use it every year while making $50k in 4 months working on lobster boats your rates will never go up and you can collect every year. It is a stabilization force in our economy even if it isn't perfect and unfair to many.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4863 posts
937 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
fogetmylogin wrote:
Nov 30th, 2017 6:47 am
I am pretty sure he won't be getting paternity benefits either.

Basically EI is a tax. If you are a student you are ineligible but still pay into it. If you have a guaranteed job you still pay into it. If you use it every year while making $50k in 4 months working on lobster boats your rates will never go up and you can collect every year. It is a stabilization force in our economy even if it isn't perfect and unfair to many.
You're eligible if you're a part-time student, but only you and your instructor(s) how much time you're actually putting into your studies.
e.g. Doing a self-paced course, but keeping your on-paper course load below a full-time definition.

If you're putting real effort into seeking work paying like your previous job whilst, then it satisfies EI requirements. They do random checks sometimes and ask for job search proof. After certain x months, EI then asks you to settle for reduced wages relative to your previous job. They have the numbers somewhere on their site.

EI has a negative incentive system, kind of like Oliver Twist. Pays shit, hard to get, and they go after you for overpayment for as little as something like $50. Then if you make a little over $60K over the year (Google for the exact number), they make you repay 30% of it at tax time. You're best to do what they like - look for well paying work while you're on it. Even when I've been a part-time student every year and being laid off from construction, I've been actively looking for work at the same time.

If you want to avoid paying into EI, start your own company and make business income, as then EI premiums don't have to be deducted from it if you hold a >=40% stake in the company. Unless of course you hire employee(s), then you have to deduct EI premiums from their wages.
Deal Fanatic
May 29, 2006
8473 posts
1401 upvotes
one mat leave pays more then you pay into EI for almost 30 years.

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