Home & Garden

Outside Water Valve

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 16th, 2017 8:46 pm
[OP]
Member
May 11, 2002
289 posts
3 upvotes

Outside Water Valve

I bought a house recently and in getting ready to winterize, I have always been taught to turn off the water to the outside pipe. I was trying to locate this valve but couldn't find it in my new house. I have found the main water valve but not one that specifically controls the water to the outside. I contacted the previous owner and he indicated that in the past 12 years that he owned the property, had has never shut off the water to the outside and he didn't know how to. Does that make any sense that there is no valve inside the outside to control the outside water? The house is about 30 years old. Appreciate any assistance from the experts on this forum.

Thanks
29 replies
Newbie
Oct 17, 2017
16 posts
It may be different in your house, but ours is located in the basement ceiling - there is a little metal flap that i have to open to reach it. it was painted white, so wasn't noticeable at first but the home inspector pointed it out to us. Did you have an inspection done on the property? Maybe worth asking him/her?
Member
Feb 26, 2016
448 posts
73 upvotes
same with mine. located in the basement for both my backyard water valve and the garage one.
[OP]
Member
May 11, 2002
289 posts
3 upvotes
Thanks for the response. I think what I have are frost free pipes (based on some research I just did), which my understanding is no shut off is required for winter. I am having a plumber come in to take a look tmrw just for my own peace of mind. But thanks all for the comments.
Deal Addict
Aug 2, 2003
2028 posts
70 upvotes
Toronto
Not much to tell you other than to try and follow the pipe as best as you can. For example, my parent's backyard valve leads to a split in the kitchen valve. So under the kitchen sink, there is 2 separate cold water valves, one for the backyard valve and one for the kitchen sink.

As for the garage valve, it goes into the basement in the between two studs in the ceiling.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
844 posts
330 upvotes
Barrie ON
There are freeze proof faucets, but you better be good and sure you have one. These special faucets have the valve about 12-18 " inside the house, compared to a regular faucet which has the valve located outside.

Even if you have one of these special faucets there should still be a shutoff valve inside the house. You don't some vandal to turn on your outside water during the winter. The valve is usually located within 4 feet of where the pipe enters the wall, and is usually located between 2 parallel floor joists.

The faucet in out garage enters throught the concrete wall, and the shutoff is located under the powder room vanity on the other side.

Image
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
4295 posts
2909 upvotes
GTA
Rick007 wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 11:01 am
There are freeze proof faucets, but you better be good and sure you have one. These special faucets have the valve about 12-18 " inside the house, compared to a regular faucet which has the valve located outside.

Even if you have one of these special faucets there should still be a shutoff valve inside the house. You don't some vandal to turn on your outside water during the winter. The valve is usually located within 4 feet of where the pipe enters the wall, and is usually located between 2 parallel floor joists.

The faucet in out garage enters throught the concrete wall, and the shutoff is located under the powder room vanity on the other side.

Image
+1
Sr. Member
May 17, 2012
858 posts
327 upvotes
grand valley
there should be a shutoff inside. follow the line where it comes inside the house, most likely it's not far from there.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
5185 posts
1012 upvotes
BC
As it is 1980's construction, and we are agreed that it must have been upgraded to freeze-proof (prior to the previous owner), my guess is that contractor did a tidy job of concealing the existing shutoff valve.

Such as under a sink as already mentioned, in a closet, or covered by a neat wall plate somewhere. I doubt he covered it up permanently.

Whether you choose to shut off in winter or not, you are correct in wanting to know where that valve is.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
4295 posts
2909 upvotes
GTA
OP, got a picture of the outside valve? Someone here may be able to identify it as freeze proof. Otherwise you could disassemble the valve to see if it is a long freeze proof one.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2006
7796 posts
1874 upvotes
Brampton
Assuming it's not a bungalow
Is the basement finished?
Sometimes during a hack job basement they drywall right over everything including the inside shutoff.

A relative of mine who had their basement done by a flyby night crew has this exact scenario. Great drywall work. I just hope he never has to find the shutoffs, clean outs or junction boxes.
Deal Addict
Aug 29, 2011
2505 posts
575 upvotes
Mississauga
Freeze-proof doesn't necessarily mean that. My buddy had a supposed freeze-proof outside spigot freeze, split open an leak water in his basement.

I have them too. But as added protection I always shut the water off to them.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 10, 2015
1188 posts
236 upvotes
St. Catharines, ON
I had basically the same question. From the outside at least, my faucet looks like the one pictured in post #6.

I tried to find a shut-off, but either it does not exist, or it got drywalled over when the basement bathroom was put in.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
1252 posts
330 upvotes
London
mrweather wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 4:49 pm
Freeze-proof doesn't necessarily mean that. My buddy had a supposed freeze-proof outside spigot freeze, split open an leak water in his basement.

I have them too. But as added protection I always shut the water off to them.
Everybody make note that these rely on any remaining water being on the warm side of insulation and above freezing.
If the insulation is poor, and the supply side gets cold enough to freeze, they won't work.
If they aren't permitted to drain and water remains on the cold side after being shut off, they won't work.

All they do is extend the shutoff point to a warm location.
"freeze proof" is a bit of a mis-nomer.

If you don't have this type, but rather "normal" type, also ensure water drains enough from the cold side to not split fittings.
Simply shutting off the supply inside, and allowing a water filled pipe to freeze, is not sufficient.
Sr. Member
Oct 22, 2015
566 posts
133 upvotes
Hamilton, ON
Also the frost free faucet must be installed at a slightly downward angle to allow the water to drip out of the faucet. Otherwise if it's not it defeats the price of the faucet.

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