Careers

Part time vs Full time

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 8th, 2017 10:55 am
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
241 posts
16 upvotes
apnayloags wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2017 9:55 am
Probably a parttime job with no benefits. Thats what it sounds like....they will offer u more hours but keep u in parttime category so u get no benefits at all but work close to fulltime.
Thats how majority of employers treating new hires. They give u 6 hrs per day so u cant take up another job due to scheduling but they dont give u vacation or benefits. They will then ask u if u still want it, and many desperate ppl will take it.
Welcome to Canada, where most jobs parttime no benefits but just slaves they need. Immigration ensures plenty of applicants for every shity job
That's exactly the question when I started this post. If, by law, there's no fine line drawn on part time vs full time category based on number of hours worked. Why employers can't offer a 40 hour week job without paying benefits and vacation? The thing is, when they only offer something "close to full time hours", one won't get enough income while not able to take up another part time job due to scheduling.

Desperate enough to take on a part time job without benefits is one thing, not having enough income to live by is real
too.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
241 posts
16 upvotes
FirstGear wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2017 10:45 am
Usually it's by hours/week, throughout a bi-weekly pay period. per week, <35 is part time, >35 is full time.

But the definition of full-time vs. part-time can differ depending on who is referencing it for irregular work schedules/compressed work weeks.

For payroll purposes, something like a one week on, one week off schedule, where the week on is 12 hrs/day; 84 hours for the week - would equate to "full time", as you're averaging 42 hours/week of work. But you would still receive EI on the week off if you have a claim ongoing, as you're technically not working >=35 hours/week every week.
There's a job posting I'd want to apply but it says "this job can be 4-5 days a week, 8am - 3pm". Sounds like a part time job if one is working for 5 days? It's an office job.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4862 posts
937 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
wyho007 wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2017 10:57 am
There's a job posting I'd want to apply but it says "this job can be 4-5 days a week, 8am - 3pm". Sounds like a part time job if one is working for 5 days? It's an office job.
Yes.. it sounds like they just want to work you enough so you barely slide under the "full time" definition.
i.e. 28 - 35 hours/week

But key word is "can", so in reality you might work even less.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
3562 posts
1410 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
wyho007 wrote:
Dec 2nd, 2017 10:39 am
It really sounds nice indeed. But wouldn't the medical costs be a jeopardizing factor since you don't get extended health coverage at your part time job? Or, is it possible to get health benefits working part time?

I don't care to climb up the career ladder but somehow I can't get around the fact that it seems the equivalent hourly rate of a full time job is really close to that of a part time job when the latter has no health coverage and other benefits.

I'm not familiar with working part time so appreciate if you can say more how it's like working part time.
I work full time, but I couldn't even tell you the last time I used extended medical benefits for anything. I've been in good health and don't have any prescriptions. I know all that could change anytime, but it wouldn't be a make or break deal for me when considering a job (not all full time jobs have those benefits). There are programs if you have high prescription costs for your income level.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
241 posts
16 upvotes
Chickinvic wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 12:24 pm
I work full time, but I couldn't even tell you the last time I used extended medical benefits for anything. I've been in good health and don't have any prescriptions. I know all that could change anytime, but it wouldn't be a make or break deal for me when considering a job (not all full time jobs have those benefits). There are programs if you have high prescription costs for your income level.
What is a job that is "hourly paid full time with no benefits"? Is it the same as "hourly paid part time with close to 40 hours working weeks"?

Why do employers seem to attempt everything to avoid employing full time employees? I was told it's really tough to fire someone full time should something goes wrong. Or, is it the administrative costs associated with a full time employee?

I've been applying jobs (part time and full time) recently, got calls for either. Seems like their interviewing process is the same and employers are not easier with hiring a part time employee.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
2107 posts
347 upvotes
Edmonton
apnayloags wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2017 9:59 am
How do u pay rent, food, etc unless u live with earning family or super rich?

Do u realize most ppl cant afford to live on parttime gigs? Whats your other supporting system ?
Thank you for your concern. I made just shy of 29 grand in October. And I don't waste money (rent).

All I do is part time/contract/temp jobs.

I have done one day jobs, 3 days, week, and up to several months long jobs. And right now I am unemployed and on my 3 month vacation backpacking Asia.

Edit:
If I want benefits I just pay for it.....
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
3562 posts
1410 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
wyho007 wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 10:36 pm
What is a job that is "hourly paid full time with no benefits"? Is it the same as "hourly paid part time with close to 40 hours working weeks"?

Why do employers seem to attempt everything to avoid employing full time employees? I was told it's really tough to fire someone full time should something goes wrong. Or, is it the administrative costs associated with a full time employee?

I've been applying jobs (part time and full time) recently, got calls for either. Seems like their interviewing process is the same and employers are not easier with hiring a part time employee.
I've had salary full time positions in places that don't offer extended medical/dental, benefits too. Not every workplace has them. Full time employees do not have any right to benefits as part of the labour code or anything. It will vary from employer to employer. These were small firms I'm talking about. My current small firm offers benefits. I didn't bother with the extended medical as I have coverage from my husbands (and I haven't used it once).
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2007
4222 posts
711 upvotes
There's a lot of confusion about PT and FT. There's actually no legal definition of part time and full time. It's typically defined by employers, if at all.

If you have read employment standards, you will find that there are no rules tat specifically mention the term "full time" or "Part time". Our laws are mostly based on "gross salaries". Things like vacation pay and holiday pay are standard and apply to your gross salaries so it doesn't matter if you are defined part time or full time.

The biggest confusion is probably benefits. People have this impression full time = benefits. Part time = no benefits. There's actually no law mandating employers to offer benefits for people working over x number of hours. Employers typically WANT to offer benefits because group plans are economical and giving benefits is a more tax efficient way to offer compensation than raw salaries.

Think about the legal nightmare of trying to define part time vs full time. If I work 40 hours this week, and next week I work 20 hours, what am I? There's actually no benefit or reason to legally define part time and full time. For the employers, it will just incentivize them to make more people part time if you make a rule to give full timers more. For employees, it's ultimately how much you get paid for your work that matters.
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2013
756 posts
253 upvotes
OTTAWA
Chickinvic wrote:
Dec 5th, 2017 10:36 am
I've had salary full time positions in places that don't offer extended medical/dental, benefits too. Not every workplace has them. Full time employees do not have any right to benefits as part of the labour code or anything. It will vary from employer to employer. These were small firms I'm talking about. My current small firm offers benefits. I didn't bother with the extended medical as I have coverage from my husbands (and I haven't used it once).
Exactly and benefits are generally overrated in Canada unless you need a lot of prescription medicines.
You will get vacation time or pay regardless of your status. At least in all the provinces I have worked.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
241 posts
16 upvotes
For a part time job opportunity, when going for interview answering questions, is it welcoming for the employers that the employee would like to work towards a full time long term status?

I used to work for full time jobs and now considering for part time ones as well, just wondering what's good to tell full time job employers will be bads for part time job employers.
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2007
4222 posts
711 upvotes
wyho007 wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 11:20 am
For a part time job opportunity, when going for interview answering questions, is it welcoming for the employers that the employee would like to work towards a full time long term status?

I used to work for full time jobs and now considering for part time ones as well, just wondering what's good to tell full time job employers will be bads for part time job employers.
Put yourself in the shoes of the employer. If the job posting is advertising part time and you state that you are looking for full time, how do you think the employer would feel? If it's a seasonal type job, the interviewer is probably not even in a position to make any promises.

Part time works for a lot of people like students or people who need to take care of their family. So if the employer has 2 candidates where 1 says he/she wants part time and the other says he/she wants to work towards full time, who do you think will get selected?
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
241 posts
16 upvotes
BananaHunter wrote:
Dec 7th, 2017 11:48 am
Put yourself in the shoes of the employer. If the job posting is advertising part time and you state that you are looking for full time, how do you think the employer would feel? If it's a seasonal type job, the interviewer is probably not even in a position to make any promises.

Part time works for a lot of people like students or people who need to take care of their family. So if the employer has 2 candidates where 1 says he/she wants part time and the other says he/she wants to work towards full time, who do you think will get selected?
You have your point. Maybe I was just taken by surprise when I was being asked, "What's your long term goal?" so I thought the employer wants to hire something who has the desire to grow in the position.
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2007
4222 posts
711 upvotes
wyho007 wrote:
Dec 8th, 2017 9:25 am
You have your point. Maybe I was just taken by surprise when I was being asked, "What's your long term goal?" so I thought the employer wants to hire something who has the desire to grow in the position.
This depends on the situation. There are organizations who can't afford a full time position or hasn't grown large enough to justify hiring a full time. Then there are some jobs where specifically they are looking for part time because of the nature of the work. Like in the food industry some employers may WANT to hire only part time.

Your strategy should be to gauge the situation and play accordingly. You can ask questions like where do you think the company is going in 5 years? If it sounds like a growing company, then it may be beneficial to state you are "willing" to go full time as needed. If it sounds like the company just needs someone to do some small thing a few times a week, suggesting full time probably does more harm than good.

Always diagnose the situation first. Never get lazy and fall back on "golden rules". I read all the time how "you are not supposed to be the first to give your salary expectation". This is total BS. I've had great success in business and in career where being the first to give a number made sense. You need to know your negotiating position and play accordingly.

Top