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Path to Get a 'Good' Government Job?

  • Last Updated:
  • May 21st, 2019 1:46 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
May 24, 2012
152 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto

Path to Get a 'Good' Government Job?

Serious question. Asking on behalf of someone else.
Sometimes we hear about those 'government jobs' that are cushy, easy, pay decent, and don't require that much skill.

What are those jobs exactly? And what type of education does one need to get them?
32 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
2437 posts
1324 upvotes
LOL...that's a very vague question, doubtful you'll get much of answer. I don't know what "decent pay" means for you, but if you have little skill or education, doubtful you'll get a decent paying job. Those decent paying jobs are commensurate with experience, eduation and skill. Nowadays without that, you're lucky if you get an entry level admin position - even then it's' who you know or sometimes luck. Internal staff generally get first pick. I know peope with master degrees in admin positions. I suggest telling "your friend" to first figure out what kind of job he/she wants, look at some job postings and try to get some of the skills and experience listed in the posting. Then craft a smart cover letter and resume specific to the job where you present yourself in the best light possible without being dishonest...that will be your best bet.
Member
Dec 11, 2013
348 posts
209 upvotes
Toronto
In addition, there are usually some jaded feelings and ignorance behind those descriptions.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2013
1175 posts
693 upvotes
North York
JFlash20 wrote: In addition, there are usually some jaded feelings and ignorance behind those descriptions.
Agreed. Can taste the salt in the air
Newbie
Jun 25, 2013
42 posts
14 upvotes
MARKHAM
Canadian Forces

Many office type jobs there if your willing to relocate and don't mind doing the Basic Military Qualification.
Deal Addict
Oct 18, 2014
1916 posts
808 upvotes
HK
If your friend requires you to ask and research on their behalf, then their probability of success is low.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
2784 posts
961 upvotes
Why not look into Canadian banking?

Plenty of relatively cushy, easy, and low paying jobs. But there is a lot more "intellectual stimulation" than in the government.

Eventually, people can go from low paying jobs to more challenging positions, and make some decent money.

Working for the government is not for everyone!
Newbie
Sep 30, 2010
54 posts
31 upvotes
Mississauga
motomondo wrote: Why not look into Canadian banking?

Plenty of relatively cushy, easy, and low paying jobs. But there is a lot more "intellectual stimulation" than in the government.

Eventually, people can go from low paying jobs to more challenging positions, and make some decent money.

Working for the government is not for everyone!
what is the path to canadian banking?

You must be talking about retail banking...
Member
Jan 1, 2015
460 posts
305 upvotes
Toronto, ON
weirdlogic wrote: Serious question. Asking on behalf of someone else.
Sometimes we hear about those 'government jobs' that are cushy, easy, pay decent, and don't require that much skill.

What are those jobs exactly? And what type of education does one need to get them?
  • University degree, engineering preferred
  • Canadian Forces experience (anything really to get veteran status). Would probably be best to be a technician or something doing some maintenance.
  • French speaking
  • Minority'
  • Canadian citizen
If you can get all of the above, you pretty much have the your pick at whatever government job you want.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
2784 posts
961 upvotes
jackpie wrote: what is the path to canadian banking?

You must be talking about retail banking...
It can be anything. It can be retail banking, or technology, or corporate. Young people can start at an entry level job, and make a career out of it.

I know a man who started as a bank teller, and today is a SVP in technology. His success story is not typical, but it is a reminder that you can make a successful career here.

Honestly, I prefer the banks over the government (I work in banks, but in the past, I tried working for an agency of the provincial government).
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
30297 posts
16126 upvotes
Ottawa
Find someone that is in a management position.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 10, 2015
2243 posts
842 upvotes
Monte Creek, BC
If you are English speaking, then learn to speak French. If you can speak it well enough you have a good chance of moving up in the federal government. This is about the only reason to be bilingual in French and English.
No political content in signatures (Who did I offend?)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2007
1102 posts
1132 upvotes
BC
weirdlogic wrote: Serious question. Asking on behalf of someone else.
Sometimes we hear about those 'government jobs' that are cushy, easy, pay decent, and don't require that much skill.

What are those jobs exactly? And what type of education does one need to get them?
That ought to be one of the biggest myths about government jobs that's out there - cushy (like doing little work), easy (not mentally challenging or manual labour), decent pay (like over $35,000) and requires little skill. Funny, how everyone talks about these "government jobs" but no one knows anyone who works in one.

How about Politician?? Pays really well, can be dumb as rocks, don't do anything but attend signing ceremonies, and the only skill needed is BS skills feeding gullible voters what they want to hear. Proof: Look at the Idiot-in-Chief down South.

If you really want to research what government jobs "pays decent" you just have to look up the collective agreements for the various governments - they are all publicly available. As to jobs that "pay decent" and meet all the other criteria you mentioned, good luck. "Mail clerk" may be one that is listed but good luck trying to get it from the current incumbent.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2013
580 posts
245 upvotes
motomondo wrote: It can be anything. It can be retail banking, or technology, or corporate. Young people can start at an entry level job, and make a career out of it.

I know a man who started as a bank teller, and today is a SVP in technology. His success story is not typical, but it is a reminder that you can make a successful career here.

Honestly, I prefer the banks over the government (I work in banks, but in the past, I tried working for an agency of the provincial government).
CEO of CIBC's first job was a teller.

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