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Path to Get a 'Good' Government Job?

  • Last Updated:
  • May 21st, 2019 1:46 pm
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2203 posts
1272 upvotes
I can’t tell if the OP is being serious or not.

Are you seriously asking what are Government jobs?

They’re jobs where people work for the Government. Generally, working for a crown corporation (organization owned by the Government) is usually also considered to be a Government job.

‘How do people get these jobs’ - They apply (usually online) for them.

Not that difficult to comprehend.
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
2940 posts
2292 upvotes
It would help if you wrote which level of government - federal, provincial or municipal.

I agree with a previous poster. The idea that govt workers are low skilled with cushy well paid jobs is a cliche that is about 40 years old.

As a former HR Manager with e federal govt, I can provide some insight for you, if you are interested in a federal govt position.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5149 posts
1205 upvotes
Ottawa
FrugalConsumer wrote:
  • University degree, engineering preferred
  • Canadian Forces experience (anything really to get veteran status). Would probably be best to be a technician or something doing some maintenance.
  • French speaking
  • Minority'
  • Canadian citizen
If you can get all of the above, you pretty much have the your pick at whatever government job you want.
I would have to disagree with the comment. Certainly while all these qualifications can help get a government job, they certainly won't give you "your pick at whatever government job you want". Even with those getting a government job is not easy and having those will not give you that much of an edge over others. There are certainly some jobs where you need to speak french or bilingual but the majority of government positions are English essential (although as you move up into management and senior management roles, being bilingual becomes a requirement).
Newbie
Jun 21, 2015
76 posts
6 upvotes
Montreal
For anyone working at gov't job. Once you're in, are there opportunities to grow and move up? Or are you stuck in the same position for a long time before you can move up. Thank you.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5149 posts
1205 upvotes
Ottawa
momawj wrote: For anyone working at gov't job. Once you're in, are there opportunities to grow and move up? Or are you stuck in the same position for a long time before you can move up. Thank you.
It's a bit weird. The ability to move is one of the benefits of gov jobs. Once you are a permanent employee, it's quite easy to move laterally and there are tons of internal opportunities. There are also a lot opportunities to move up but from my experience, it's not like with private sector companies where your boss will give you a promotion for a job well done. It's very common to get "acting" opportunities (temporary promotion - typically 4 months but sometimes 1 year or more but to get a permanent promotion is rarely direct. I believe it's probably because of past abuse and to make sure the process is transparent but you pretty much have to apply to open jobs in order to move up and then there's a formal or semi-formal process. The other thing that's different than private sector is that pretty much all gov jobs have a set pay scale and you can't be outside the payscale and payscales have steps - each year you go up one step and get a specific raise. Once you hit the top of the scale, your salary will not go up any more except for the usual "cost-of-living" increase (often about 1% or less per year). (i.e. if you stay in the same job category / level for 20 years, you'll get regular annual raises about about 5% but once you hit the top of the scale, your salary will never go higher (except for the cost of living increase). Everyone at the same level gets the same raise and for non-exec staff, there are no bonuses (i.e. two employees in the same category / level will get the same raise even if one is a great employee and the other one a terrible employee).
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
42004 posts
5559 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
I know a person who used to be a light house operator.
Close to $20 per hour with full government pension and benefits.
You sit and do nothing most of the time. Watch movies or netflix on the laptop. go out shopping and run errands and come back to clock yourself out.
Take a 2 hour lunch break and no one notices because the person you report to just shows up once a week to inspect the premise.


I also read the newspaper article of that person who runs this museum in the middle of no where Ontario... ITs run by the govt of ontario.. so you get a good pension and benefits. Pay was something like $25/hour and you need a history degree.
Since the museum is in the middle of no where. No one goes to it. So she is probably sitting there all day doing nothing. Dusting random displays etc.
Must be a nice living too.. .In that type of no where town in Ontario... You could probably get a big double garage house for $200k.
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2018
1786 posts
1359 upvotes
Bay Area
UrbanPoet wrote: I know a person who used to be a light house operator.
Close to $20 per hour with full government pension and benefits.
You sit and do nothing most of the time. Watch movies or netflix on the laptop. go out shopping and run errands and come back to clock yourself out.
Take a 2 hour lunch break and no one notices because the person you report to just shows up once a week to inspect the premise.


I also read the newspaper article of that person who runs this museum in the middle of no where Ontario... ITs run by the govt of ontario.. so you get a good pension and benefits. Pay was something like $25/hour and you need a history degree.
Since the museum is in the middle of no where. No one goes to it. So she is probably sitting there all day doing nothing. Dusting random displays etc.
Must be a nice living too.. .In that type of no where town in Ontario... You could probably get a big double garage house for $200k.
To be fair they're not exactly swimming in cash, and the pay reflects the low requirements of the job. Yeah I get the cost of living argument, but the trade-off is you're stuck in the middle of bumphuck nowhere unless you fancy doing a long commute. Dunno about you but I'd be bored out of my mind by the end of the first week.
Member
Sep 29, 2014
212 posts
160 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Define "good." Federal government jobs are definitely harder to land than municipal and provincial. Government jobs in Toronto are harder to land than anywhere else in the country. Legal jobs in government are harder to land than any other government job.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
42004 posts
5559 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
arkane wrote: To be fair they're not exactly swimming in cash, and the pay reflects the low requirements of the job. Yeah I get the cost of living argument, but the trade-off is you're stuck in the middle of bumphuck nowhere unless you fancy doing a long commute. Dunno about you but I'd be bored out of my mind by the end of the first week.
No doubt. I’m with you.
These situation its more like.... the pay & benefits is really good considering what it is.
People are making minimum wage breaking their backs @ a factory. Or running around in a food service place until their feet are sore and minds are numb from demanding and at times unreasonable customers.
Member
Jun 19, 2010
242 posts
47 upvotes
I work a provincial government job in downtown Toronto. Don't wanna reveal too much, but it's the easiest job I've ever had, cushy, and pays about 85k. Most IT government positions will be like this because they contract vendors who do about 90% of the work. Right now, it's actually impossible to get a permanent position because Ford government has frozen all government spending, a lot of the job postings going out right now are for existing government employees only. If you can get in through the Ontario Internship Program or another student co-op, now is the time to do it because there's a bunch of teams that need to backfill positions on a 6-12month basis and will take almost anyone.
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2012
1991 posts
313 upvotes
Toronto
Please don't be one of the ******* who don't try once you get that government job.
Deal Addict
Dec 20, 2018
2221 posts
1621 upvotes
UrbanPoet wrote: No doubt. I’m with you.
These situation its more like.... the pay & benefits is really good considering what it is.
People are making minimum wage breaking their backs @ a factory. Or running around in a food service place until their feet are sore and minds are numb from demanding and at times unreasonable customers.
Not really, shitty work environment, lack of career progression or growth and not exactly easily accessible, will need own vehicle

Who would work it for min wage when they can walk down the street to some fast-food place and just dick around
Member
Oct 15, 2017
358 posts
231 upvotes
Canada
angrybanker wrote: CEO of CIBC's first job was a teller.
Sure, but he also has an MBA from Harvard. Regardless of what his first job was he probably would have been successful regardless.

From Victor Dodig's bio page:

He is a graduate of the Harvard Business School, where he earned an MBA and was recognized as a Baker Scholar. Victor holds a diploma from the Institut d'études politiques in Paris and completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto (St. Michael's College) in Commerce.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
5423 posts
772 upvotes
Ottawa
dsweetlou wrote: Sure, but he also has an MBA from Harvard. Regardless of what his first job was he probably would have been successful regardless.

From Victor Dodig's bio page:

He is a graduate of the Harvard Business School, where he earned an MBA and was recognized as a Baker Scholar. Victor holds a diploma from the Institut d'études politiques in Paris and completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto (St. Michael's College) in Commerce.
I've seen a lot of cases where someone works at some minimum wage job somewhere while they're going to business school/law school/etc, and then if they end up working at a high-level position there sometime later in their careers the story is always "X worked up the ranks from Y job and now is the president of the company!".
Member
Oct 15, 2017
358 posts
231 upvotes
Canada
ConsoleWatcher wrote: I've seen a lot of cases where someone works at some minimum wage job somewhere while they're going to business school/law school/etc, and then if they end up working at a high-level position there sometime later in their careers the story is always "X worked up the ranks from Y job and now is the president of the company!".
Everyone likes to hear a feel good story. I worked at a company a few years ago and there was a person working in the back (Shipping/Receiving) who applied to an opening in the IT department as a developer, when one of the developers left for another company. That person was a brilliant programmer, and eventually a few years later when the head of IT left, they applied to become the Chief Information Officer. The CEO likes to mention during speeches that the CIO started in the back and is now the CIO. He fails to mention that they have a Masters in Computer Science, which they acquired before they immigrated to Canada. I asked her about it, and they said when she immigrated to Canada the government said come to Canada your IT skills are in demand. When she arrived, nobody would recognize her degree, so she had to find work in factories to start out. Only by chance, did the IT manager at the time, hire her as a developer because "it was cheaper" than hiring a consulting company. Crazy.

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