Shopping Discussion

PC Plus (soon to be PC Optimum) Discussion Thread

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 11th, 2017 8:28 am
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Nov 15, 2008
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minimalist wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 6:50 pm
Is it a general rule that is you mostly spend at No Frills your offers will tend to be 10% whereas RCSS would be 20%?

I observed that my mom tends to get mostly 10% offers and she does most of her shopping at No Frills.

I mostly shop at RCSS and mostly get 20% offers. Sometimes we get exactly the same produce offers and she gets 10% while I get 20%.
Hmmm, yeah, someone else has told me that they saw the No Frills card getting lower offers than their family and when they hit the Loblaws a few times with it and deleted some of the lowball offers, they had much better offers by the end of 3 weeks.

However I know for sure that number of times you scan your card counts for better offers, as one store printed cue cards for the cashiers to tell customers exactly that. That's official advice.

I wonder if my friend started getting better offers on his card because the No Frills + Loblaws trips together bumped up his visit frequency, and not just that he started shopping at Loblaws.

Maybe your mom shops a bit less frequently than you?
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Jun 26, 2011
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lecale wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 7:52 pm
Hmmm, yeah, someone else has told me that they saw the No Frills card getting lower offers than their family and when they hit the Loblaws a few times with it and deleted some of the lowball offers, they had much better offers by the end of 3 weeks.

However I know for sure that number of times you scan your card counts for better offers, as one store printed cue cards for the cashiers to tell customers exactly that. That's official advice.

I wonder if my friend started getting better offers on his card because the No Frills + Loblaws trips together bumped up his visit frequency, and not just that he started shopping at Loblaws.

Maybe your mom shops a bit less frequently than you?
I'm kinda afraid of deleting "low-ball" offers i.e. 10% off beef because if I don't start getting 20....then I've got nothing
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RolandCouch wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 7:57 pm
I'm kinda afraid of deleting "low-ball" offers i.e. 10% off beef because if I don't start getting 20....then I've got nothing
Keep the 100 pts/$1 on beef, delete the other junk, shop more often, and maybe one of the new offers that pops up will be 200 pts/$1 on beef and you can stack the two? Someone else in the thread got both beef offers before and it worked for 30%, and I've had the same on chicken.

Could happen. Not saying it will, but you can try to make it happen.
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Feb 1, 2006
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RolandCouch wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 7:57 pm
I'm kinda afraid of deleting "low-ball" offers i.e. 10% off beef because if I don't start getting 20....then I've got nothing
My understanding is that if you delete an offer you will probably get another offer on the same product once you buy more of it. That's how it was explained to me upthread.
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lecale wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 7:52 pm
Hmmm, yeah, someone else has told me that they saw the No Frills card getting lower offers than their family and when they hit the Loblaws a few times with it and deleted some of the lowball offers, they had much better offers by the end of 3 weeks.

However I know for sure that number of times you scan your card counts for better offers, as one store printed cue cards for the cashiers to tell customers exactly that. That's official advice.

I wonder if my friend started getting better offers on his card because the No Frills + Loblaws trips together bumped up his visit frequency, and not just that he started shopping at Loblaws.

Maybe your mom shops a bit less frequently than you?
My Mom shops at No Frills quite frequently, I counted 25 visits over the last 6-7 weeks, so I don't think that's why. I, on the other hand, only tend to shop once, sometimes twice a week.

So, my theory is that Loblaws has a lower profit margin at No Frills than RCSS so it offers correspondingly lower % offers.

If what you are saying about scanning your card more often getting you better offers is true then you've raised a good question. Is it better to:

1. Use 2 accounts, like a husband and wife, to try to maximize offers?

OR

2. Use only 1 PC Plus account to try to get better offers?

My wife and I usually go shopping together and we pay separately scanning our own PC Plus card.

If we do #2, the number of scanned trips will not increase but the total spend on the card will. Any thoughts?
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Jun 26, 2011
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lecale wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 8:01 pm
Keep the 100 pts/$1 on beef, delete the other junk, shop more often, and maybe one of the new offers that pops up will be 200 pts/$1 on beef and you can stack the two? Someone else in the thread got both beef offers before and it worked for 30%, and I've had the same on chicken.

Could happen. Not saying it will, but you can try to make it happen.
I used to get 20%. I shop at no frills mostly and now I get 10% all the time. Who knows maybe I'll get 20 again one day
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minimalist wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 8:11 pm
My Mom shops at No Frills quite frequently, I counted 25 visits over the last 6-7 weeks, so I don't think that's why. I, on the other hand, only tend to shop once, sometimes twice a week.

So, my theory is that Loblaws has a lower profit margin at No Frills than RCSS so it offers correspondingly lower % offers.
Time for an experiment...need to get Mom to the RCSS a few times and see if anything changes on her card. The where-you-shop effect was my first guess and I found a hint in among the jargon below that's the case:

Loblaw Employs Super-Targeted Loyalty Program Powered by 10 Billion Scores a Week
Allocate marketing investment according to a member’s current value to the company, their potential value (opportunity for share-of-wallet growth), where they shop (discount versus conventional grocery stores), or any other identifiable attribute of interest. This enables precise tactical investments across a pinpoint set of stores.

Balance the conflicting objectives of offer relevance (something the customer would likely buy) and product incrementality (something the customer would be unlikely to buy without the offer).
http://www.fico.com/en/blogs/marketing- ... es-a-week/
minimalist wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 8:11 pm
If what you are saying about scanning your card more often getting you better offers is true then you've raised a good question. Is it better to:

1. Use 2 accounts, like a husband and wife, to try to maximize offers?

OR

2. Use only 1 PC Plus account to try to get better offers?

My wife and I usually go shopping together and we pay separately scanning our own PC Plus card.

If we do #2, the number of scanned trips will not increase but the total spend on the card will. Any thoughts?
I have one account because I do all the shopping, but if the other guy would get into PC Points I'd gladly work with two. Twice the offers. Definitely better odds of a shopping bingo with two unlinked cards.
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Feb 1, 2006
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lecale wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 7:52 pm
However I know for sure that number of times you scan your card counts for better offers, as one store printed cue cards for the cashiers to tell customers exactly that. That's official advice.
That's interesting but I wonder if Loblaws instructed their cashiers to say so just to encourage people to shop more often and spend more. How can we verify this independently of what Loblaws has said?
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minimalist wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 10:55 pm
That's interesting but I wonder if Loblaws instructed their cashiers to say so just to encourage people to shop more often and spend more. How can we verify this independently of what Loblaws has said?
Someone posted a photo of the card that was given to cashiers on a site I can't link to because it is verboten, a competitor (thank you Angela). Basically:
- Scan card for every transaction even if there are no points
- get 18 base offers instead of 12
- get 5 bonus offers instead of 1-2
- get 1,000 pt offers instead of 200 pt offers

The 1,000 pts offers would be mostly 1,000 pts/$5 but sometimes 1,000 pts/product. If your item is e.g., $7.99 then obviously 200 pts/$1 is better. Here are some of the 1k offers I've had. Good or bad? Cashmere was on sale for $4.00 so 3 for $12 earned me 2,000 pts. Some of the Seaquest fillets are $4.00 on sale at No Frills so 5 for $20 will get you 4,000 pts. You need to buy a load of something to take full advantage of the offers.

1,000 on Neilson 4L Milk
1,000 on PC Shredded Cheese
1,000 For every $5 spent on Kraft Cheez Whiz
1,000 For every $5 spent on Christie Brand Crackers
1,000 For every $5 Spent on PC Frozen Boxed Burgers
1,000 For every $5 spent on Seaquest Frozen Fillets
1,000 Windex Glass Cleaner
1,000 For every $5 spent on Kitchen Prep and Dinnerware
1,000 For every $5 Spent on Rubbermaid Food Containers
1,000 For every $6 spent on Cashmere, Sponge Towels, or Scotties products
1,000 For every $5 spent on L’Oreal Hair Care Products
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Aug 12, 2006
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I would like to run an idea past everyone. It concerns PCplus. My idea is to share offers. Example, I keep getting 10% off Beef. Never use it. Maybe someone else gets 10% off chicken and never uses it. We swap a screenshot of each others PCplus card. I buy my chicken, they buy their beef. Now of course, this has to be between people who trust each other. Wouldnt want points being redeemed (probably best to keep redemptions locked till needed) And there are a lot of details to be worked out, such as correcting any inequality depending on amount of points. But that is the basic idea. Thoughts?
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Jan 7, 2002
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It's an intriguing idea but I can think of several issues just off the top of my head...

1. Most people buy more than just one item, beef or chicken in your example. So each party would have to segregate their orders between card1 and card2, then do two separate checkouts and payments. Do you really think many people are prepared to do that in order to score a few extra PC points? Now imagine a three-way swap, etc. and/or a swap with a different partner every week. My head spins at the thought.

2. In your example the assumption is that both parties don't need to use the bonus offers they get. How likely is that? I get that you don't buy beef. What if your partner buys both beef and chicken? Why would they swap?

3. This could only work if there was a simple clearing house website where people could announce what they have to offer and what offer they'd like to swap it for. Some level of data entry automation and offer search capability is essential. Who's going to create and operate such a website? What's in it for them? What happens when disputes arise?

4. I haven't checked PCPlus' terms and conditions, but you'd have to make sure that card swapping (or equivalent) isn't prohibited.

5. With the points redemption fraud of earlier this year it's possible that PCPlus' fraud detection has been, um, beefed up to look for suspicious activity like the same card number being used at two different locations in a short period of time. I'm too, um, chicken to play the swap game if I risk losing my account and accumulated points altogether after being accused of points fraud.
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To add to the conversation, I'm an almost daily Zehrs shopper (small, <$10-15 trips). So going on average 6 days of the week -- I live a block away. I also do one NoFrills trip every Sunday.

All of my offers are either 20%, with some being 30% (these are more for the spend $5 or $10 ones), and then the bulk offers like get " xxx " number for purchasing "this" -- eg my $.97 English Muffins have a 400 point offer on them, so effectively 40%
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bylo wrote:
Oct 1st, 2017 7:29 am
It's an intriguing idea but I can think of several issues just off the top of my head...

1. Most people buy more than just one item, beef or chicken in your example. So each party would have to segregate their orders between card1 and card2, then do two separate checkouts and payments. Do you really think many people are prepared to do that in order to score a few extra PC points? Now imagine a three-way swap, etc. and/or a swap with a different partner every week. My head spins at the thought.

2. In your example the assumption is that both parties don't need to use the bonus offers they get. How likely is that? I get that you don't buy beef. What if your partner buys both beef and chicken? Why would they swap?

3. This could only work if there was a simple clearing house website where people could announce what they have to offer and what offer they'd like to swap it for. Some level of data entry automation and offer search capability is essential. Who's going to create and operate such a website? What's in it for them? What happens when disputes arise?

4. I haven't checked PCPlus' terms and conditions, but you'd have to make sure that card swapping (or equivalent) isn't prohibited.

5. With the points redemption fraud of earlier this year it's possible that PCPlus' fraud detection has been, um, beefed up to look for suspicious activity like the same card number being used at two different locations in a short period of time. I'm too, um, chicken to play the swap game if I risk losing my account and accumulated points altogether after being accused of points fraud.
Kudos for making something as complicated as possible.

Anyways:
1) Different transactions is a given. If you were using my card for buying the beef, only do that purchase on my card. If you goof up and buy bananas before I do, the sky won't fall down, and I just won't give you those points back.

2) Very likely. I have 19 offers of which I will only be using 4. What really matters are the offers you know you won't use.

3) Clearing house, you can't be serious.

4) It probably is, so if you only do things 100% as to their terms, this ain't for you.

5) I wouldn't suggest doing this with $1,000 worth of points, but do you think they would want to shut down my $20 account because someone got me 800 points on beef, I think not.

BTW, similarily, I have been submitting my friends Air Miles card for years on my purchases. No one has moved to shut that down.
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beachlover wrote:
Oct 1st, 2017 11:55 am
3) Clearing house, you can't be serious.
How else are you going to do it? Are you planning to pollute this thread with 100s of posts from people who have this and want that, etc? [Please, no!]
4) It probably is, so if you only do things 100% as to their terms, this ain't for you.
So now you want RFD to aid and abet what some might view as a form of piracy or fraud?
5) I wouldn't suggest doing this with $1,000 worth of points, but do you think they would want to shut down my $20 account because someone got me 800 points on beef, I think not.
So you admit this is a dodgy idea that you wouldn't want to gamble large amounts of points on. That speaks volumes.
BTW, similarily, I have been submitting my friends Air Miles card for years on my purchases. No one has moved to shut that down.
What you do informally between friends you know and trust is completely different from from what you propose others do with strangers they don't know and perhaps can't trust.

This idea probably also means different partners from week to week as well as different partners for different deals. How many people are you prepared to give your account number to? What if someone "misbehaves"?

Perhaps you'll share how you envisage that this would work if not on a separate website that's dedicated for the purpose where people have to register and there's some sort of accountability.

And to keep this all in perspective, "800 points on beef" is $0.80. The hassle, never mind the risk, far exceeds the value of the reward, especially for a "free-for-all" solution. At least IMO. Maybe others are more adventurous.

As I said, an intriguing idea if there's a way to make it practical--and safe.
Last edited by bylo on Oct 1st, 2017 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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lecale wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 11:22 pm
Someone posted a photo of the card that was given to cashiers on a site I can't link to because it is verboten, a competitor (thank you Angela). Basically:
- Scan card for every transaction even if there are no points
- get 18 base offers instead of 12
- get 5 bonus offers instead of 1-2
- get 1,000 pt offers instead of 200 pt offers

The 1,000 pts offers would be mostly 1,000 pts/$5 but sometimes 1,000 pts/product. If your item is e.g., $7.99 then obviously 200 pts/$1 is better. Here are some of the 1k offers I've had. Good or bad? Cashmere was on sale for $4.00 so 3 for $12 earned me 2,000 pts. Some of the Seaquest fillets are $4.00 on sale at No Frills so 5 for $20 will get you 4,000 pts. You need to buy a load of something to take full advantage of the offers.

1,000 on Neilson 4L Milk
1,000 on PC Shredded Cheese
1,000 For every $5 spent on Kraft Cheez Whiz
1,000 For every $5 spent on Christie Brand Crackers
1,000 For every $5 Spent on PC Frozen Boxed Burgers
1,000 For every $5 spent on Seaquest Frozen Fillets
1,000 Windex Glass Cleaner
1,000 For every $5 spent on Kitchen Prep and Dinnerware
1,000 For every $5 Spent on Rubbermaid Food Containers
1,000 For every $6 spent on Cashmere, Sponge Towels, or Scotties products
1,000 For every $5 spent on L’Oreal Hair Care Products
Do they do rounding for these offers? Like say if I purchase $4.96 will they still give the 1000 points?

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