Automotive

Performing your own rear brake drum service.

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  • Oct 5th, 2012 11:40 am
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Apr 15, 2005
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001Stunna wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2012 3:45 pm
Replacing shoes/drums is rather a lot more challenging then replacing pads/rotors. If you have the right tools though, its just another thing to do.
You have to deal with about 3-4 springs in drum brakes, a variety of clips and wheel cylinders that can pop out their covers if pushed too hard upon and leak brake fluid.
I've done drums/shoes using pliers before and it was annoying as hell as the main spring can be a b1tch to go in/out. Bought myself a brake shoe plier tool for ~8$ to aid in removing/installing the springs and it makes life 1000 times easier.

A great video for first timers
The youtube videos are actually useful.
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JohnB wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2012 10:47 pm
Thanks for the comments and the youtube video.
kingrukus wrote:
Oct 4th, 2012 3:31 am
The youtube videos are actually useful.
They're a great start for first timers as long as you keep in mind that the setup may be different then shown in the video. It gives you the gist of what you will have to do though.
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001Stunna wrote:
Oct 4th, 2012 4:15 am
They're a great start for first timers as long as you keep in mind that the setup may be different then shown in the video. It gives you the gist of what you will have to do though.
honda civic is more simple, less springs to deal with :) the key is to remember where everything goes and to lube the contact areas plus at the same time i would open the bleeder nipples to flush the lines if it is more than 2 years.
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packardbell wrote:
Oct 4th, 2012 7:57 am
honda civic is more simple, less springs to deal with :) the key is to remember where everything goes and to lube the contact areas plus at the same time i would open the bleeder nipples to flush the lines if it is more than 2 years.
From your pics, your civic is the same as my 99 accord...which is pretty close as the vehicle in the video. Its pretty easy to remember where things go as no springs are alike or same length plus simply looking at the other side if you feel lost always helps. My main issue/problem when doing the job with just normal pliers was getting the main spring back on while making sure the shoes didnt push out the wheel cylinder too far out in one side or the other and pop out the seals. Using the brake shoe pliers made things so great i got no cuts at all on my fingers.

& if you are going to pop open the bleed screws for your own sake make sure you spray some PB Blaster or other lubricant in there and let it sit while you do the brakes...since if you don't you'll snap the bleeder screw head like me and have to reopen the drums all overrrr again and replace the wheel cyliner.
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[quote="001Stunna" post_id="15493891" time="1349388785" user_id="36411"]From your pics, your civic is the same as my 99 accord...which is pretty close as the vehicle in the video. Its pretty easy to remember where things go as no springs are alike or same length plus simply looking at the other side if you feel lost always helps. My main issue/problem when doing the job with just normal pliers was getting the main spring back on while making sure the shoes didnt push out the wheel cylinder too far out in one side or the other and pop out the seals. Using the brake shoe pliers made things so great i got no cuts at all on my fingers.

& if you are going to pop open the bleed screws for your own sake make sure you spray some PB Blaster or other lubricant in there and let it sit while you do the brakes...since if you don't you'll snap the bleeder screw head like me and have to reopen the drums all overrrr again and replace the wheel cyliner.[/QUOTE]

So your saying to spray lubricant into the bleeder screw hole? Or on the outside of the screw on the threads?
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cheapmeister wrote:
Oct 4th, 2012 6:30 pm
you can spray outside and inside the hole of the bleeder screw. spraying inside the holes does not mean the PB blaster will enter the brake line and contaminate your brake fluid.
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packardbell wrote:
Oct 4th, 2012 6:37 pm
Okay. So how tight do you torque the bleed screw? If you torque it too much the screw will snap, but not enough and the fluid could leak out. Just go by experience and feel?
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cheapmeister wrote:
Oct 4th, 2012 7:11 pm
the bleeder screw is conical with a hole, and as you tighten you are creating a seal around the cone. I go by feel but check your manufacturers torque rating some can be in inch pounds and some like 10 ft lbs.
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well if you are scared of breaking off the bleeder, take a propane torch and heat up that bleeder valve nice and hot, then take a small six sided socket to it and it should loosen up in one piece.

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