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Picking up a puppy in 3 weeks. Am I missing something here?

  • Last Updated:
  • May 25th, 2018 1:13 pm
[OP]
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Oct 22, 2012
1023 posts
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Picking up a puppy in 3 weeks. Am I missing something here?

Hey guys, I'm picking up a puppy (cockapoo) in 3 weeks. I've been back and forth with the breeder 2 times already and anticipate I'll be there another 2 more times before the pick up date.
I've read 2 books on positive reinforcement training and watched countless youtube videos on how to crate, potty train, leash walking. Am I missing anything else?
2 x Clickers
Indoor Kennel
Crate
Crate Bedding
Blanket
Crate Cover
Toys
Food Bowl
Water Bowl
Soft Puppy Treats
Chosen a Vet - Don Head - http://www.vetratingz.com/reviews/1833/ ... linic.html (anyone know if this site is legit?)
Dog Pee Pads (for winter)
Leash
Collar

BTW: Anyone have any recommendations on a puppy training school close by Steeles and Bayview? I don't mind driving 15 kms to get there.
32 replies
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Jul 22, 2006
21659 posts
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^
Do you live in a home with easy access to a front or back yard? If so, get rid of the dog pee pads after the dog's ~10 months

My dog is a tiny ~12 lbs shih-tzu

The way we taught the dog was initially with pee pads too but it seemed like the dog would just pee "where" the pad would "typically be" instead of actively searching for it. So after 10 months when vet said it was safe to go outside we got rid of them... PS I found out those pads are covered in horse pee *GROSS*

The key to training our dog so quickly (just turned 2 years old smarter than most) was REPETITION & ROUTINE.

In general when we weren't home the dog went into the crate but when we were home the dog was ALWAYS in view or in the crate...

For washroom we followed a routine when the dog showed ANY signs of going to the washroom or was doing it in front of us... I would pick up the dog (even if it was going to the washroom), say BAD, take it to the backyard, say "washroom" and be out there with the dog for ~5 minutes. It went outside the same time everyday and we slowly decreased the amount the dog went outside to two times a day.

During the winter last year I cleared some patio area and dog went to the washroom there, it was freezing cold so I reduced the time outside to around 3 minutes. But really the dog loved playing in the snow so it was outside for ~5 minutes. Eventually with this routine & repetition the dog learned to only do it's business outside the house.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 23, 2009
5153 posts
679 upvotes
South of Ottawa
Ditch the pee pads. You are basically adding an unnecessary step to potty training. Teach him to go outside right from the start.
[OP]
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Oct 22, 2012
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george__ wrote:
Oct 27th, 2016 11:50 pm
^
Do you live in a home with easy access to a front or back yard? If so, get rid of the dog pee pads after the dog's ~10 months

My dog is a tiny ~12 lbs shih-tzu

The way we taught the dog was initially with pee pads too but it seemed like the dog would just pee "where" the pad would "typically be" instead of actively searching for it. So after 10 months when vet said it was safe to go outside we got rid of them... PS I found out those pads are covered in horse pee *GROSS*

The key to training our dog so quickly (just turned 2 years old smarter than most) was REPETITION & ROUTINE.

In general when we weren't home the dog went into the crate but when we were home the dog was ALWAYS in view or in the crate...

For washroom we followed a routine when the dog showed ANY signs of going to the washroom or was doing it in front of us... I would pick up the dog (even if it was going to the washroom), say BAD, take it to the backyard, say "washroom" and be out there with the dog for ~5 minutes. It went outside the same time everyday and we slowly decreased the amount the dog went outside to two times a day.

During the winter last year I cleared some patio area and dog went to the washroom there, it was freezing cold so I reduced the time outside to around 3 minutes. But really the dog loved playing in the snow so it was outside for ~5 minutes. Eventually with this routine & repetition the dog learned to only do it's business outside the house.
My home has a front yard along with fully fenced backyard and entry in and out the home is not an issue. However with November being cold as it is, won't the weather make potty training so much more harder for the dog? Do your dogs dislike leaving the warm confines of your homes to eliminate in the snow and ice? I had originally thought that pee pads along with a pee pad holder would be a good solution for those really cold days and for the occasions when no one will be home?
Deal Addict
May 18, 2015
1312 posts
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Ottawa,Ont
FlukeSkywalker wrote:
Oct 28th, 2016 1:50 am
george__ wrote:
Oct 27th, 2016 11:50 pm
^
Do you live in a home with easy access to a front or back yard? If so, get rid of the dog pee pads after the dog's ~10 months

My dog is a tiny ~12 lbs shih-tzu

The way we taught the dog was initially with pee pads too but it seemed like the dog would just pee "where" the pad would "typically be" instead of actively searching for it. So after 10 months when vet said it was safe to go outside we got rid of them... PS I found out those pads are covered in horse pee *GROSS*

The key to training our dog so quickly (just turned 2 years old smarter than most) was REPETITION & ROUTINE.

In general when we weren't home the dog went into the crate but when we were home the dog was ALWAYS in view or in the crate...

For washroom we followed a routine when the dog showed ANY signs of going to the washroom or was doing it in front of us... I would pick up the dog (even if it was going to the washroom), say BAD, take it to the backyard, say "washroom" and be out there with the dog for ~5 minutes. It went outside the same time everyday and we slowly decreased the amount the dog went outside to two times a day.

During the winter last year I cleared some patio area and dog went to the washroom there, it was freezing cold so I reduced the time outside to around 3 minutes. But really the dog loved playing in the snow so it was outside for ~5 minutes. Eventually with this routine & repetition the dog learned to only do it's business outside the house.
My home has a front yard along with fully fenced backyard and entry in and out the home is not an issue. However with November being cold as it is, won't the weather make potty training so much more harder for the dog? Do your dogs dislike leaving the warm confines of your homes to eliminate in the snow and ice? I had originally thought that pee pads along with a pee pad holder would be a good solution for those really cold days and for the occasions when no one will be home?
No, dogs love the snow (so long as it isnt minus 40 and freezing their paws). I also recommend never using the pee pads. Just open the door every two hours for your puppy to go outside. Increase the two hour time period by one hour each month as he/she grows.

Dogs will naturally prefer to pee outside rather than inside their home where they sleep.
Deal Addict
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Aug 10, 2015
1534 posts
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St. Catharines, ON
FlukeSkywalker wrote:
Oct 28th, 2016 1:50 am
george__ wrote:
Oct 27th, 2016 11:50 pm
^
Do you live in a home with easy access to a front or back yard? If so, get rid of the dog pee pads after the dog's ~10 months

My dog is a tiny ~12 lbs shih-tzu

The way we taught the dog was initially with pee pads too but it seemed like the dog would just pee "where" the pad would "typically be" instead of actively searching for it. So after 10 months when vet said it was safe to go outside we got rid of them... PS I found out those pads are covered in horse pee *GROSS*

The key to training our dog so quickly (just turned 2 years old smarter than most) was REPETITION & ROUTINE.

In general when we weren't home the dog went into the crate but when we were home the dog was ALWAYS in view or in the crate...

For washroom we followed a routine when the dog showed ANY signs of going to the washroom or was doing it in front of us... I would pick up the dog (even if it was going to the washroom), say BAD, take it to the backyard, say "washroom" and be out there with the dog for ~5 minutes. It went outside the same time everyday and we slowly decreased the amount the dog went outside to two times a day.

During the winter last year I cleared some patio area and dog went to the washroom there, it was freezing cold so I reduced the time outside to around 3 minutes. But really the dog loved playing in the snow so it was outside for ~5 minutes. Eventually with this routine & repetition the dog learned to only do it's business outside the house.
My home has a front yard along with fully fenced backyard and entry in and out the home is not an issue. However with November being cold as it is, won't the weather make potty training so much more harder for the dog? Do your dogs dislike leaving the warm confines of your homes to eliminate in the snow and ice? I had originally thought that pee pads along with a pee pad holder would be a good solution for those really cold days and for the occasions when no one will be home?
My Mini Labradoodle came home to us in January. Yes, it was cold. The puppy could not stay outside very long before starting to shiver. But, she never showed any resistance to going outside. She was always happy to go outside, just could not stay long. We did not find the weather to be an obstacle to potty training. We did not use indoor pee pads. We wanted to send the message that peeing inside our house is never ok.


In response to your list, you are pretty well covered.
What do you mean by crate bedding? Some puppies like to chew and destroy things, so those soft fluff filled crate liners often get torn apart in short order. We just used old towels or cheap blankets ($3, Dollarama) inside the crate, until our pup was over 6 months old.

Speaking of chewing, you will need something your dog will like to chew. Split elk antlers, though expensive, can be a great option. Puppies want to chew. You need to give them something you can direct them to when they want to chew. My dog loves elk antlers.
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2011
839 posts
246 upvotes
Kitchener
agree ditch the pee pads, they can be a nightmare to train out of

for an 8 week old pup, take out it after every: nap, meal and playtime and at least every hour, use a cue (like go potty) and reward a lot when they go (treats, toys, be super excited about it). Ideally stay outside until pup goes (using a leash helps to limit distractions) but that's not always feasible, in which case crate the pup for 10 minutes or so and try again. They may not like the cold (some dogs dont care so much) but once they go the reward will be going inside :p
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1130 posts
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British Columbia
I've never had a problem with pee pads delaying training. They were only used however when my puppy would be in her pen, which we used until she was about 5 months. I figured she would have accidents in the house until then regardless of it we used pee pads or not. Once we moved her from the pen to a crate at night she would ask to go out at night and she learned quickly. Combined with needing to ask at night someone was always with her during the day so there was constant reinforcement. All dogs learn at different ages... Some are almost perfect by 3 months and others might take closer to a year to get it. Some breeds in general take longer to get it.

We had a Cockapoo once and they're smart little dogs. My only caution is to make sure you aren't paying an arm and a leg for a designer dog. They aren't a true breed but since they're so popular people can end up paying a huge price tag for them from "breeders" that make them sound like they're a steal. But you'd be supporting either a backyard breeder (doesn't care to check health or temperament nor knows a thing about the foundation breeds -- just wants money and will pretty much give their dogs to the first person that will pay for it) or even worse a puppy mill. We didn't know any better when we got ours and after some digging years later realised the sellers name was likely linked to a puppy mill, and some horrific stories.

One of the problems is that no good breeder will sell a purebred Poodle or Cocker Spaniel without a spay/neuter contract or without sending the pup home already spayed/neutered... so you are often already starting out with substandard dogs that are being breed from.

A purebred with papers and genetic health testing from breeders that screen their potential new homes and that only breed dogs that are temperament tested and fit the breed standard AND will often take back the pup at any point of its life often cost much less than these mix breeds unfortunately.

I currently have a Mini Aussie (another "in" dog) and I searched long and hard for a breeder that had health testing, wasn't a kennel (not a puppy mill essentially), had very few dogs in their home and bred for temperament (the parents of the litter were both registered Service Dogs so I knew they had great personalities -- a potential concern with Aussies as they can be very leery of strangers.) They also charged a reasonable price and didn't charge thousands just because they're popular.
Newbie
Mar 7, 2007
11 posts
2 upvotes
Canada
FlukeSkywalker wrote:
Oct 27th, 2016 4:55 pm
BTW: Anyone have any recommendations on a puppy training school close by Steeles and Bayview? I don't mind driving 15 kms to get there.
Check out North York Obedience Club, they are at Steeles Ave E and Willowdale, classes are held in a church on Lillian Street.
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
964 posts
248 upvotes
Toronto
For working couples/single owners that must leave their puppy home alone for hours, pee pads are needed.

If you have someone at home with the puppy all day long, ya ditch the pads.

You absolutely cannot allow the puppy to get into the habit of doing it's business on the floor/carpet.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
3057 posts
475 upvotes
Pee pads only for when you need to be out. Otherwise out into the cold you go (along with many of the rest of us)!
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
3057 posts
475 upvotes
FlukeSkywalker wrote:
Oct 27th, 2016 4:55 pm
Hey guys, I'm picking up a puppy (cockapoo) in 3 weeks. I've been back and forth with the breeder 2 times already and anticipate I'll be there another 2 more times before the pick up date.
I've read 2 books on positive reinforcement training and watched countless youtube videos on how to crate, potty train, leash walking. Am I missing anything else?
2 x Clickers
Indoor Kennel
Crate
Crate Bedding
Blanket
Crate Cover
Toys
Food Bowl
Water Bowl
Soft Puppy Treats
Chosen a Vet - Don Head - http://www.vetratingz.com/reviews/1833/ ... linic.html (anyone know if this site is legit?)
Dog Pee Pads (for winter)
Leash
Collar

BTW: Anyone have any recommendations on a puppy training school close by Steeles and Bayview? I don't mind driving 15 kms to get there.
Re the vet, have you met him yet? I have learned to take on-line reviews with a grain of salt. Some are true, others not so much. There are 4 vets in the vet clinic we frequent. Two partners and two associates - so someone is always available. Each vet has a different personality.

Re the training, you will need to determine the type of training that you find most comfortable for your dog and you. Trainers have different methods - some I would not go near.
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May 11, 2008
9421 posts
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FlukeSkywalker wrote:
Oct 27th, 2016 4:55 pm
Hey guys, I'm picking up a puppy (cockapoo) in 3 weeks. I've been back and forth with the breeder 2 times already and anticipate I'll be there another 2 more times before the pick up date.
I've read 2 books on positive reinforcement training and watched countless youtube videos on how to crate, potty train, leash walking. Am I missing anything else?
2 x Clickers
Indoor Kennel
Crate
Crate Bedding
Blanket
Crate Cover
Toys
Food Bowl
Water Bowl
Soft Puppy Treats
Chosen a Vet - Don Head - http://www.vetratingz.com/reviews/1833/ ... linic.html (anyone know if this site is legit?)
Dog Pee Pads (for winter)
Leash
Collar

BTW: Anyone have any recommendations on a puppy training school close by Steeles and Bayview? I don't mind driving 15 kms to get there.
I'd add poop bags and some grooming supplies to that list.
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Apr 7, 2012
2542 posts
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Toronto
A lot has been covered already in this thread ... but the big one: who will be letting the puppy out to pee every 3 hours?
Rule of thumb for pups: for every month they are, is an hour they can hold it .. ex: 3 months old, 3 hours, 6 month, 6 hours.

As an owner of a dog walking company, I can't tell you the number of panicked puppy parents call on Sunday night before they're going to work and realize their new addition will need a walker to help house break them and take them out for a mid day and mid afternoon pee/poop break.
Member
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Mar 11, 2012
281 posts
66 upvotes
Definitely socialization with humans and other dogs.
some think with a small dog no training is necessary. Even go to petsmart and walks around if you can't afford it. Watch YouTube

I personally stay away from treat based training. Maybe to learn tricks. But even that is still a mixture of positive reinforcement vs food/treats

Mental stimulation with physical exercise.

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