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Political Science internships?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 23rd, 2017 1:32 am
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 18, 2005
16559 posts
1003 upvotes
Niagara Falls
I can't see where you are located because I'm on mobile but there are a few big elections occuring in Ontario if that is where you are.

Volunteer there if you can. It's a start.
Member
Aug 8, 2010
280 posts
30 upvotes
Hell, I was going to jump into law, saw how miserable the job outlook was a few years ago, and am now in law enforcement - where the pay and benefits are about at par with Senior Crown counsel, without the extra 3 years of school and 10 years of ladder-climbing. Don't limit yourself to the scope of your degree!
wow...what kind of law enforcement pay more than 6 figures?

why it is miserable? I thought lawyers charge at least a few hundred dollar per hour?
Newbie
Sep 6, 2016
32 posts
26 upvotes
1000islands wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 6:36 pm
Hell, I was going to jump into law, saw how miserable the job outlook was a few years ago, and am now in law enforcement - where the pay and benefits are about at par with Senior Crown counsel, without the extra 3 years of school and 10 years of ladder-climbing. Don't limit yourself to the scope of your degree!
wow...what kind of law enforcement pay more than 6 figures?

why it is miserable? I thought lawyers charge at least a few hundred dollar per hour?
Any policing gig where there's overtime/on-call available. With most police forces paying $80-90k base salary at the constable level, it's relatively easy to hit mid-6 figures with overtime/on call.

I'm not writing off the legal profession as 'miserable' - far from it. I'm sure there's miserable lawyers out there, as with any profession. There's more risk involved, more investment in terms of time and education...and as far as compensation, the pay is hugely variable - I'm sure you'll find some making $50k, others in the 7 figure range. Don't forget though - as with almost any profession, billable hours aren't the same as hourly wage.
Member
Aug 8, 2010
280 posts
30 upvotes
homenoob wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 8:18 pm
Any policing gig where there's overtime/on-call available. With most police forces paying $80-90k base salary at the constable level, it's relatively easy to hit mid-6 figures with overtime/on call.
wow......is it hard to be a police? everyone just go and work in the policing profession then.
Newbie
Sep 6, 2016
32 posts
26 upvotes
1000islands wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 8:38 pm
homenoob wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 8:18 pm
Any policing gig where there's overtime/on-call available. With most police forces paying $80-90k base salary at the constable level, it's relatively easy to hit mid-6 figures with overtime/on call.
wow......is it hard to be a police? everyone just go and work in the policing profession then.
It takes a while to get into the profession, yes. The application takes about a year (in my experience), and from the time of application to successful graduation, maybe 1 in 100 are successful. There's quite a few requirements, the training takes about a year, and the job itself can be...challenging. It's definitely not for everyone, and even some that make it through the process and try it for a few months/years can't hack it and quit. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, as you're exposed to a lot of situations that 95% of the general public will never see and would never be able to cope with in a professional manner.
Member
Aug 8, 2010
280 posts
30 upvotes
homenoob wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 9:10 pm
It takes a while to get into the profession, yes. The application takes about a year (in my experience), and from the time of application to successful graduation, maybe 1 in 100 are successful. There's quite a few requirements, the training takes about a year, and the job itself can be...challenging. It's definitely not for everyone, and even some that make it through the process and try it for a few months/years can't hack it and quit. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, as you're exposed to a lot of situations that 95% of the general public will never see and would never be able to cope with in a professional manner.
OKey, dokey...thanks for the info.

I can never be one, coz I am too small. I will scare no one as a police.
Newbie
User avatar
Oct 29, 2016
32 posts
18 upvotes
Montreal
Realistically speaking, forget all the BS you've been told about the prestigious institutions like the UN, World Bank, etc. These jobs are for the elite and unless you come from an ivy league school or got a top notch network, you won't break into these places straight out of college. Most people who get into these spent years working for NGOs, the private sector, government, etc, and ideally got a master's degree or MBA in the process.

However some of these places got internships, which are most often unpaid. They are competitive to get into and you'll basically end up being a slave for months but you will have a good opportunity to network and get a good reference in your CV. Don't be afraid to do BS unpaid internships, political science grads often need to do * jobs to leverage something real.

If a paid experience is what you're after: NGO's, the private sector (learn to sell yourself, have good story, and network your way into it), consulting (if you got good grades and know how to network, a lot of firms accept candidates from non-business backgrounds), and of course, the government. Most government jobs are cushy and overpaid, and a lot of political science grads can get interesting jobs in the city/government offices with salaries ranging from 18 to 25$/hour on the first year. It's a lot of bs to go through due to their overly complicated websites and recruiting process, but it's worth it if the options you got are either this or McDonald's.
Deal Addict
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Sep 16, 2012
3013 posts
289 upvotes
Mississauga
Look at various non for profits, contact your local MP MPP and City Councillor, it all depends what area you want to get into.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
3565 posts
440 upvotes
Aurora
Talk to someone, like a career counselor, at your university. Or student services in the poli sci dept.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Banned
User avatar
Nov 19, 2014
910 posts
241 upvotes
OP, do you actually want to do politics? It's a lot about networking. You can try to volunteer with a campaign, but they'll likely stick you with some shitty position like handing out fliers. Then forget about you after the election -- so it can largely be a waste of time. You're almost better off trying to run for City Council or volunteer for someone who wants to run for something small like that, and get your name out there. You won't get your name out there working for a larger campaign (as someone else mentioned, it's better to go smaller). If you look at Lauren Southern, her fame comes from taking a very niche political position.

If you're a minority, try volunteering for minority associations. Or if you're white, see if you can a union or political parties you have interest in. If it's a party you have interest in, it won't feel like work.

Politics is a lot of people self-interested, looking out for themselves. Moreso than a lot of industries from my experience. So, I'd be careful. The game is dirty.

If you're not that interested in politics, you can try city gov. jobs. I know some people with political science or sociology degrees that work at recreation centers or community centers. A front desk or admin job at places like Agincourt Recreation Centre, 8 rinks or Angus Glen Arena usually pay decent hourly rates ($18-20s) for really easy work. There are jobs at these centres that can lead to much higher pay. Getting into these departments, even at a low front desk level is tough though. Very few people quit because it's such easy money and a lot of people will just recommend their friends in.

Thanh wrote:
Oct 21st, 2016 9:00 am
I love these threads about people graduating in a specific field and then finding out there's isn't much they can do with their degree. Is this something you should've considered before ?
There's a lot you can do with a social science degree. The vast majority of tech recruiters have psychology/political science/sociology/gender studies degrees. They make 6 digits after benefits, with the same medical as the engineers. Frankly, they have way easier work too (though they'd never admit it). Easy $115,000 + bonus/medical/other ridiculous benefits you can get.

If you do external recruiting, you can make huge but that's a lot more work and more of a sales role. They're also filled with social science/humanities grads.
uber_shnitz wrote:
Oct 21st, 2016 1:59 pm
I think some of the criticism is valid, not to harp on necessarily your life choices, but what expectations did you have when going into the program and coming out?

Many people tend to have employers in mind or see themselves doing X and Y even while in school; did you have such an idea while in school? Have you explored those ideas/avenues?
What about other peers in school? Did they have an idea what they would be doing once exiting the program?
Usually the school has programs or alumni societies to help with figuring out jobs, or potential opportunities.

Not meant to be an attack, but I do have a hard time believing a bunch of people would make a decision about what they're going to be specializing for their career and have at least not a faint idea of what that leads to.
A lot of people go to college to discover their interests. Tons of people that end up at elite universities thinking they want to do engineering that end up switching out. There were majors at my school that I didn't even know existed in high school that I wish I could have explored more. For instance, Asian American studies was something I wish I could have taken way more classes in. Social psychology has been the most useful class I've ever taken, moreso day to day than any math or engineering class I took.

I actually think the biggest issue for people is that when they go to university, they tend to choose majors they think pay the most, not what they're good at. This attitude is prevalent on RFD, which is why you see so many people doing their 3rd college diploma or certificate program, or perpetually in school. Because they keep chasing the money, striking out on jobs, as opposed to doing what they're good at or care about, so they're stuck in a cycle of perpetual suck.
I'm At The W, But I Can't Meet You In The Lobby, Girl I Gotta Watch My Back, Cuz I'm Not Just Anybody, I Seen Em' Stand In Line, Just To Get Beside Her, That's When We Disappear, You Need GPS To Find Her, Oh That Was Your Girl? I Thought I Recognized Her."
Sr. Member
Mar 18, 2015
829 posts
166 upvotes
Antarctica
Corner3 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 5:22 pm
OP, do you actually want to do politics? It's a lot about networking. You can try to volunteer with a campaign, but they'll likely stick you with some shitty position like handing out fliers. Then forget about you after the election -- so it can largely be a waste of time. You're almost better off trying to run for City Council or volunteer for someone who wants to run for something small like that, and get your name out there. You won't get your name out there working for a larger campaign (as someone else mentioned, it's better to go smaller). If you look at Lauren Southern, her fame comes from taking a very niche political position.

If you're a minority, try volunteering for minority associations. Or if you're white, see if you can a union or political parties you have interest in. If it's a party you have interest in, it won't feel like work.

Politics is a lot of people self-interested, looking out for themselves. Moreso than a lot of industries from my experience. So, I'd be careful. The game is dirty.

If you're not that interested in politics, you can try city gov. jobs. I know some people with political science or sociology degrees that work at recreation centers or community centers. A front desk or admin job at places like Agincourt Recreation Centre, 8 rinks or Angus Glen Arena usually pay decent hourly rates ($18-20s) for really easy work. There are jobs at these centres that can lead to much higher pay. Getting into these departments, even at a low front desk level is tough though. Very few people quit because it's such easy money and a lot of people will just recommend their friends in.




There's a lot you can do with a social science degree. The vast majority of tech recruiters have psychology/political science/sociology/gender studies degrees. They make 6 digits after benefits, with the same medical as the engineers. Frankly, they have way easier work too (though they'd never admit it). Easy $115,000 + bonus/medical/other ridiculous benefits you can get.

If you do external recruiting, you can make huge but that's a lot more work and more of a sales role. They're also filled with social science/humanities grads.



A lot of people go to college to discover their interests. Tons of people that end up at elite universities thinking they want to do engineering that end up switching out. There were majors at my school that I didn't even know existed in high school that I wish I could have explored more. For instance, Asian American studies was something I wish I could have taken way more classes in. Social psychology has been the most useful class I've ever taken, moreso day to day than any math or engineering class I took.

I actually think the biggest issue for people is that when they go to university, they tend to choose majors they think pay the most, not what they're good at. This attitude is prevalent on RFD, which is why you see so many people doing their 3rd college diploma or certificate program, or perpetually in school. Because they keep chasing the money, striking out on jobs, as opposed to doing what they're good at or care about, so they're stuck in a cycle of perpetual suck.
Competing with Joneses and buying as much stuff as possible to cram in your overpriced wooden lot is way more trendy than doing something you might actually like and have a less stressful life doing. And I see this every day from almost every one including family, friends, neighbours, and coworkers. Infact I have previously been a victim of this mentality myself.
Banned
User avatar
Nov 19, 2014
910 posts
241 upvotes
1000islands wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 8:38 pm
wow......is it hard to be a police? everyone just go and work in the policing profession then.
I'm At The W, But I Can't Meet You In The Lobby, Girl I Gotta Watch My Back, Cuz I'm Not Just Anybody, I Seen Em' Stand In Line, Just To Get Beside Her, That's When We Disappear, You Need GPS To Find Her, Oh That Was Your Girl? I Thought I Recognized Her."
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 8, 2009
2427 posts
1137 upvotes
Montreal
Corner3 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 5:22 pm
OP, do you actually want to do politics? It's a lot about networking. You can try to volunteer with a campaign, but they'll likely stick you with some shitty position like handing out fliers. Then forget about you after the election -- so it can largely be a waste of time. You're almost better off trying to run for City Council or volunteer for someone who wants to run for something small like that, and get your name out there. You won't get your name out there working for a larger campaign (as someone else mentioned, it's better to go smaller). If you look at Lauren Southern, her fame comes from taking a very niche political position.

If you're a minority, try volunteering for minority associations. Or if you're white, see if you can a union or political parties you have interest in. If it's a party you have interest in, it won't feel like work.

Politics is a lot of people self-interested, looking out for themselves. Moreso than a lot of industries from my experience. So, I'd be careful. The game is dirty.

If you're not that interested in politics, you can try city gov. jobs. I know some people with political science or sociology degrees that work at recreation centers or community centers. A front desk or admin job at places like Agincourt Recreation Centre, 8 rinks or Angus Glen Arena usually pay decent hourly rates ($18-20s) for really easy work. There are jobs at these centres that can lead to much higher pay. Getting into these departments, even at a low front desk level is tough though. Very few people quit because it's such easy money and a lot of people will just recommend their friends in.




There's a lot you can do with a social science degree. The vast majority of tech recruiters have psychology/political science/sociology/gender studies degrees. They make 6 digits after benefits, with the same medical as the engineers. Frankly, they have way easier work too (though they'd never admit it). Easy $115,000 + bonus/medical/other ridiculous benefits you can get.

If you do external recruiting, you can make huge but that's a lot more work and more of a sales role. They're also filled with social science/humanities grads.



A lot of people go to college to discover their interests. Tons of people that end up at elite universities thinking they want to do engineering that end up switching out. There were majors at my school that I didn't even know existed in high school that I wish I could have explored more. For instance, Asian American studies was something I wish I could have taken way more classes in. Social psychology has been the most useful class I've ever taken, moreso day to day than any math or engineering class I took.

I actually think the biggest issue for people is that when they go to university, they tend to choose majors they think pay the most, not what they're good at. This attitude is prevalent on RFD, which is why you see so many people doing their 3rd college diploma or certificate program, or perpetually in school. Because they keep chasing the money, striking out on jobs, as opposed to doing what they're good at or care about, so they're stuck in a cycle of perpetual suck.

Thanks for the great tips and thoughtful response. I have done volunteering for a political party but I did not get a job just a few contacts but nothing major. I am trying to get a job in the political spectrum, not necessarily running for office but the ins and outs of politics for example researcher, analyst, statistics, political marketing and communication. I was thinking of trying to freelance to build a portfolio but I am not sure it's worth the effort.

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