Travel

positioning flights

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  • Sep 8th, 2013 9:08 pm
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Nov 15, 2006
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positioning flights

I heard about this on the radio the other day.
Is this something any consumer can take advantage of?
Can i just call the air line and ask if theres a positioning flight between point A and B?
Thank you!
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Usually such 'positioning flights' are not exactly scheduled many weeks/months in advance, and most often are done for the purposes of scheduled maintenance and aircraft-on-ground (AOG) situations. They might show up as an extra flight in the reservation systems if the airline has decided to sell the seats. But I haven't heard of any particularly good deals to be found on them.
TodayHello wrote:
Oct 16th, 2012 9:06 pm
...The Banks are smarter than you - they have floors full of people whose job it is to read Mark77 posts...
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Aug 27, 2011
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jessicacha wrote:
Jan 27th, 2013 2:26 am
I heard about this on the radio the other day.
Is this something any consumer can take advantage of?
Can i just call the air line and ask if theres a positioning flight between point A and B?
Thank you!
Most positioning flights these days are just regularly scheduled flights where they change the aircraft. Air Canada does this a lot on flights from Vancouver to Toronto. They may have a larger plane fly in order to position the planes in the right locations.

As Mark77 noted, most are scheduled well in advance and are sold as regular flights. As in Air Canada's case, it happens probably once a day at least between Vancouver and Toronto. It's nothing special and it's certainly not something worth "taking advantage" of as you're still paying the regular fare price.

If you're thinking that you could get cheap fares for these flights, you might as well forget it.
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joepoonie wrote:
Jan 27th, 2013 3:01 am
As Mark77 noted, most are scheduled well in advance and are sold as regular flights. As in Air Canada's case, it happens probably once a day at least between Vancouver and Toronto. It's nothing special and it's certainly not something worth "taking advantage" of as you're still paying the regular fare price.
Even on AC, especially during irregular ops, they show up in the reservation system, and typically have an "AC2xxx" or "AC7xxx" flight number associated with them.

If you get lucky, you can even manage to get on the "AC Jetz" repositioning flights, which are configured in all-business class (50-60 seats if I recall on the A320). Sometimes they'll cancel the return leg of a roundtrip pairing (ie: YYZ-BOS) that's normally flown on a CRJ, and substitute in the all-J A320. Which means that instead of being stuck crammed into a little plane, you get a nice business class seat and the wide open space of an A320.

As I wrote earlier, other repositioning flights are for when the planes go mechanical. For instance, I believe that AC had to fly an empty 767 or 777 to Argentina in the past few weeks because they had a broken one stuck there that needed repairs. Seats probably weren't sold on such flight at all and it probably left on pretty short notice. Bilateral air treaties between countries often don't just allow airlines to add additional flights above what they're licensed to operate, so they may not have been even allowed to sell seats.
TodayHello wrote:
Oct 16th, 2012 9:06 pm
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Sep 6, 2013
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Mark is right. Some airlines offer them both in Canada and U.S. They are not available all the time. So, you are better off contacting the airline office directly and asking them about positioning flights while you try to book for flight tickets.

Happy flying.

Sally.
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sallymcfly wrote:
Sep 8th, 2013 3:13 am
Mark is right. Some airlines offer them both in Canada and U.S. They are not available all the time. So, you are better off contacting the airline office directly and asking them about positioning flights while you try to book for flight tickets.
As I wrote earlier, its my understanding that they just show up as flights in the standard reservation system. Nothing that you can actually access for a lower fare. So calling the airline is just a waste of time because their CSR's don't have access to anything that's not in the standard publicly available reservation system. And even if they did, they'd still be paying the normal fares.
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Oct 16th, 2012 9:06 pm
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There is a constant juggling of aircraft to various locations. This is normal business and has been a normal routing of aircraft by all airlines since day one.
There are only a few maintenance bases (as opposed to all their destinations) and even then, certain maintenance bases can only do certain aspects of maintenance (not all can change engines for instance). Since they cut relations with Aveos, Air Canada has been using any maintenance base they can for repairs and servicing.
Airlines are not like cruise ships that have re-positioning to make a new home base for the sailing seasons.
It’s not how far you fall that counts. It’s how high you bounce that counts! General G Patton
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Pete_Coach wrote:
Sep 8th, 2013 12:10 pm
There is a constant juggling of aircraft to various locations. This is normal business and has been a normal routing of aircraft by all airlines since day one.
There are only a few maintenance bases (as opposed to all their destinations) and even then, certain maintenance bases can only do certain aspects of maintenance (not all can change engines for instance). Since they cut relations with Aveos, Air Canada has been using any maintenance base they can for repairs and servicing.
Airlines are not like cruise ships that have re-positioning to make a new home base for the sailing seasons.
Yeah AC flies planes to Duluth (A320-series), to San Salvador (various Embraers, AFAIK), and even Singapore (B777). None of these destinations for AC flights are actually 'served' by AC, and the only way these flights could be accessed would be as technical employees of AC, if even. The flights are not for sale.
TodayHello wrote:
Oct 16th, 2012 9:06 pm
...The Banks are smarter than you - they have floors full of people whose job it is to read Mark77 posts...
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