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Pouring a Concrete Pad for a Shed

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  • May 20th, 2010 2:34 pm
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Sr. Member
Mar 25, 2003
775 posts
1 upvote
Binbrook

Pouring a Concrete Pad for a Shed

I was planning on building a deck to put my shed on, but I friend at work suggested that I do a concrete pad instead. The shed is 7.5'x10', so I figure I'd need about 1.5 yards to do a 6" thick pad. How difficult would it be to clear the area and make the forms; the shed has a floor on it as well, so I figured that the top of the pad won't need to be 100% perfect. I was planning to have to guys that are going to be setting the posts for my fence pour the concrete since they'll aleady be there with a mixer. How much do you think this will this cost me? What's involved in getting the area prepared. I found this site with some good directions - http://www.ehow.com/how_5889616_prepare ... -slab.html I'm putting this is the back corner of yard; there's a very slight slope and that's the reason for making it 6" thick.
48 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 18, 2009
1364 posts
78 upvotes
Seems like overkill, unless you're planning to store a vehicle in the "shed".

If the ground is level, it would be a lot less hassle (and cost) to put down a few pavers, possibly on a base of crushed stone.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6202 posts
75 upvotes
If you go with a concrete subfloor, I'd skip the shed floor.

Ask your guys how much they'll charge if you build the form, even if we tell you that it will cost $500 / $200 / $1000 it doesn't matter if that's not the price they quote you.
Member
Feb 25, 2004
247 posts
27 upvotes
i installed a similar size shed 2 years ago and used patio stones. I dug down 2 feet laid some gravel for drainage then placed the patio stones on top. To date I have had 0 issues.
Deal Addict
Mar 8, 2009
1420 posts
109 upvotes
I paid $1200 for my 8x12 concrete pad. That included them digging, leveling, removing the soil, adding stone, and doing the concrete. Make sure that your pad is LEVEL and SQUARE otherwise you may have troubles.

Here's a picture of my finished shed.

Image
Sr. Member
Nov 24, 2002
890 posts
65 upvotes
Toronto
A concrete pad is an OVERKILL for a shed (unless you're parking inside of it!) as already stated ..

My shed which I renovated last year (new walls, doors, window and roof) was originally build in the 1970's is sitting on cinder blocks in each corner (i.e. floating).

My Neighbor who build his shed last year (8x12) put footings in each corner (4 feet deep) similar to how a deck is build. If it's good enough for a deck (where people can actually be hurt if not done correctly) then it's definitely good enough for a shed.

Most sheds are floating type. You can move them in the future. The "floating" also prevents the joists and flooring from rotting.
Deal Addict
Mar 8, 2009
1420 posts
109 upvotes
leonk wrote:
May 11th, 2010 12:45 pm
A concrete pad is an OVERKILL for a shed (unless you're parking inside of it!) as already stated ..
A Ferrari is overkill for a car.
Stainless steel appliances.
Hard Wood Floors
Granite counter tops

Why bother with any of these luxury items? Because you can!

Thats why someone gets concrete in their shed....
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 29, 2001
4773 posts
38 upvotes
Toronto
leonk wrote:
May 11th, 2010 12:45 pm
A concrete pad is an OVERKILL for a shed (unless you're parking inside of it!) as already stated ..

My shed which I renovated last year (new walls, doors, window and roof) was originally build in the 1970's is sitting on cinder blocks in each corner (i.e. floating).

My Neighbor who build his shed last year (8x12) put footings in each corner (4 feet deep) similar to how a deck is build. If it's good enough for a deck (where people can actually be hurt if not done correctly) then it's definitely good enough for a shed.

Most sheds are floating type. You can move them in the future. The "floating" also prevents the joists and flooring from rotting.
Agree, it's cost more than it's worth.

Unless we are speaking of a work area or a parking shed.

A floating footing is the way to go.

Who knows you might want to move the shed to a different spot in the future or tear down entirely.
Mark77 wrote:
Nov 16th, 2011 9:37 pm
That's not very nice....and you're missing out on a lot of valuable knowledge if you ignore me. Your loss.
Deal Addict
Jun 7, 2005
4272 posts
64 upvotes
wouldn't you technically need a permit to pour a concrete pad? A pissy neighbour could report it and you might be forced to have it removed.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 26, 2008
2459 posts
156 upvotes
Andex wrote:
May 11th, 2010 1:56 pm
A Ferrari is overkill for a car.
Stainless steel appliances.
Hard Wood Floors
Granite counter tops

Why bother with any of these luxury items? Because you can!

Thats why someone gets concrete in their shed....
Excellent point. If you can afford concrete why not? I rather have a concrete base than wood that may rot and smell over time. Good enough for Rome good enough for me.

Your shed looks great Andex. How much did it cost to build it?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 12, 2007
3004 posts
142 upvotes
Ottawa
We went with a concrete pad for our pool house but that's because we custom-built the unit using the concrete surface as its floor and got the benefit of a low door threshold.

I agree with others that, if your shed is a kit type with a wooden floor, a concrete pad is overkill. Our yard shed (a separate unit that has a built-in floor platform) is jack posts on pavers that, in turn, rest on a packed crushed aggregate base. Works fine.
Deal Addict
Mar 8, 2009
1420 posts
109 upvotes
Si98 wrote:
May 11th, 2010 2:52 pm

Your shed looks great Andex. How much did it cost to build it?
The shed cost $4500.00 with concrete pad, painting and power hook up.

It's 8x12 with 8' high walls. The total floor to ceiling height is 11' so we have a lot of vertical storage.
Jr. Member
Mar 30, 2010
165 posts
5 upvotes
Why is pouring a concrete pad overkill?
Unless it's 16" thick... and not the 6" claimed by the OP.

What's the other option? Wood frame over ground?
I don't care what you put under the shed.... it will rot.

Lots of family members have sheds... some 6y/o and some up to 15y/o.
All the floors in these sheds have rotted out.

If I were to build a shed... it would be a pad.
And I would pull hydro for lights/outlets.
-Ensure it's properly vented.
-And make the doors open out. (yeah I know.... this is a given)

Good luck. :D
Sr. Member
Nov 24, 2002
890 posts
65 upvotes
Toronto
A wood floor will rot only if it's standard pine sitting on the ground ... if you build it like this, you deserve it to rot out on you!

The correct way to build a shed would be to use pressure treated wood for the floor joists and pressure treated for the plywood floor. The walls and roof can be build from regular pine. You then cover the walls with tyvek + siding, and the floor can either be painted or better yet, a vinyl covering can go down on it.

My shed was originally build in 1973 by a carpenter that owned the house at the time. Back then, you didn't have pressure treated wood, so he painted the floor joists with an oil based paint (dark green in color). :) The joists are about 3-4" above ground. The wood still looks brand new, almost 40 years later.

You can use concrete pad if you want, it's your sed .. your money. If it was up to me, I would have saved the $$$ and spent it elsewhere (like electricity to shed, better lighting, other projects around the house).

The problems with concrete, as far as I can see are:

- Concrete will crack on you
- Concrete still needs to be sealed (or oil, etc will make it look like ass)
- Concrete is more expensive
- Concrete will require the sill plate of the walls to attach to it.. so you got more serious rot potential there (where in typical house construction, the sill plate is above ground, and not at ground level!)

Good luck with your project ..
Sr. Member
Dec 5, 2007
543 posts
1 upvote
NB
leonk wrote:
May 12th, 2010 9:54 am
A wood floor will rot only if it's standard pine sitting on the ground ... if you build it like this, you deserve it to rot out on you!

The correct way to build a shed would be to use pressure treated wood for the floor joists and pressure treated for the plywood floor. The walls and roof can be build from regular pine. You then cover the walls with tyvek + siding, and the floor can either be painted or better yet, a vinyl covering can go down on it.

My shed was originally build in 1973 by a carpenter that owned the house at the time. Back then, you didn't have pressure treated wood, so he painted the floor joists with an oil based paint (dark green in color). :) The joists are about 3-4" above ground. The wood still looks brand new, almost 40 years later.

You can use concrete pad if you want, it's your sed .. your money. If it was up to me, I would have saved the $$$ and spent it elsewhere (like electricity to shed, better lighting, other projects around the house).

The problems with concrete, as far as I can see are:

- Concrete will crack on you
- Concrete still needs to be sealed (or oil, etc will make it look like ass)
- Concrete is more expensive
- Concrete will require the sill plate of the walls to attach to it.. so you got more serious rot potential there (where in typical house construction, the sill plate is above ground, and not at ground level!)

Good luck with your project ..
This seems a bit harsh. Perhaps it might be overkill to have a concrete floor for a shed but if you pour it 6-8" thick and put in stress cuts, you will have a very solid floor for far longer than any wood floor. Cracking isn't an issue, it doesn't need to be sealed (it's a shed after all), sill plates can all be made of pressure treated the pad is set 6-8" above ground so no rotting issues, etc. That being said a well built pressure treated shed frame will last perhaps through several house owners. Which is better? Depends on the application and what is to be stored. For instance it can be nice to embed a steel ring into the concrete floor to secure expensive equipment from being stolen (snow blowers, dirt bikes, etc). It is also better if you are storing heavy equipment like lawn tractors, ATVs, spare car parts (engines, trannys) or other large items. It is more expensive but depending on the circumstances a concrete floor can be very useful.
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