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[Loblaws] Prime rib roast $3.88/lb @ Loblaws

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  • Dec 24th, 2012 9:37 am
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Feb 26, 2004
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kneevase wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 2:59 am
This is a really good deal for AA. However, for Christmas, I think I'd probably want to spend a few more bucks to get AAA. Anybody seen good prices for AAA?
Highland Farms has it for $5.99/lb. Really nice cuts of meat.
Newbie
Dec 11, 2005
87 posts
2 upvotes
Sterling Silver aaa at Sobeys $5.99. Best beef in Canada in my opinion. Sobeys does 4 and up cuts also.
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Sep 25, 2006
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Whitby
I just cooked up a Stirling Silver prime rib from Sobeys and it was amazing, one of the best roasts I've ever had. I bought some Sterling Silver tri-tip earlier in the summer and they were awesome as well. The butchers at my local location are top notch. They really know their stuff and how to cut meat. I usually sing the praises of Costco, but it's got nothing on a good sale of Sterling Silver beef from Sobeys.
Jr. Member
Apr 29, 2009
160 posts
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Ladysmith
I worked at a high end steak house as a cook for five years. This is how I cooked all the pr roasts.

Get a roast with the fat cap still on. The butcher should cut you a deal on weight because its typically thrown out.

Season with steak spice and plastic wrap tight. Leave in the fridge for a couple days.

Get a roasting pan put an inch of water in it and put a rack on top of that. Put the roast in fat cap up so the juices from the fat run over all the meat.

Cook at 225 for 3-4 hours for rare. Add about an hour for each level of done ness above that. Ideally in a convection oven.


Cheers.
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Nov 19, 2003
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A Place to Stand
nellium wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 12:44 am
Metro here in Ontario has Grade A for 3.77
Nope, its AA. Grade A is usually reserved for prisons, high school cafeterias, M&M meat products and canned pet food. I can rarely bring myself to purchase AA, don't know how hungry I'd have to be to eat A.

Image
Sr. Member
Sep 20, 2005
960 posts
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Toronto
tha_dub wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 10:45 am
I worked at a high end steak house as a cook for five years. This is how I cooked all the pr roasts.

Get a roast with the fat cap still on. The butcher should cut you a deal on weight because its typically thrown out.

Season with steak spice and plastic wrap tight. Leave in the fridge for a couple days.

Get a roasting pan put an inch of water in it and put a rack on top of that. Put the roast in fat cap up so the juices from the fat run over all the meat.

Cook at 225 for 3-4 hours for rare. Add about an hour for each level of done ness above that. Ideally in a convection oven.


Cheers.
min/lbs for medium? thanks
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May 2, 2009
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rageking wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 7:43 am
You can get better looking pieces if you asked them to custom cut you a larger 3-6 rib roast and they will do that for you.

The piece I got wasnt aged properly, and even though it was cooked to perfection, the meat was pretty chewy. I think I might try the Metro prime rib - it's also AA but Metro is slightly more upscale and hopefully not cutting corners on the ageing of the meat.
I've had really good luck with the Metro roast beef specials. They're offering two different cuts this sale, either the bone-in or "Easy Carve" cut for a buck or so more.
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Jan 26, 2007
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kneevase wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 7:59 am
This is a really good deal for AA. However, for Christmas, I think I'd probably want to spend a few more bucks to get AAA. Anybody seen good prices for AAA?
Sobey's urban fresh AAA prime rib for $6 /
midget_man wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 4:09 pm
Nope, its AA. Grade A is usually reserved for prisons, high school cafeterias, M&M meat products and canned pet food. I can rarely bring myself to purchase AA, don't know how hungry I'd have to be to eat A.

Image
I am reminded that Jimbo Jones was cooked into "Sloppy Jimbo" in nightmare cafeteria because lunchlady Doris was "down to using grade f meat". Funny
na na na na na na na na na NA.
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Dec 31, 2005
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Toronto
james rockford wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 9:29 am
Sterling Silver aaa at Sobeys $5.99. Best beef in Canada in my opinion. Sobeys does 4 and up cuts also.
Thanks for the tip. I don't cook prime rib roasts too often and often so good thing I read this thread before I headed out to Loblaws. Last time I followed this low & slow recipe: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/kosher-sal ... rib-roast/ which turned out well.
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Sep 4, 2009
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Try this recipe - it always gives you 100% good/great results for medium-rare provided you defrost it property (check your digital t herometer prior to cooking for 20-21 degrees Celcius). Also depends on whether your oven's accurate for temperatures

Method X:
http://foodwishes.blogspot.ch/2010/11/p ... ib-of.html
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Sep 25, 2006
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Whitby
All you need is an accurate digital meat probe, going by minutes per pound is like playing Russian roulette, you don't get the same results every time. Take your roast out to rest when it hits 125 for rare, 135 for medium and 145 for well done. I if I have time I cook them at 200F, if I run late 300F. With the lower cooking temp you will have to crank the heat for 5to 10 minutes at the end to give it a chance to brown. At 275F to 300F the roast will brown decently as it cooks.
Sr. Member
Mar 30, 2009
610 posts
137 upvotes
I've always used this as my guide and have never gone wrong. I like the idea of searing the meat first to lock in the juices.

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/ClassicPrimeRib.htm

My personal preference has always been to buy my prime rib at Loblaws rather than at metro. I dislike the cap and metro always sells it with the cap when they have the sale. I don't like all the fat and it seems like a waste of money to pay for it.

For those who aren't big meat eaters, AA beef is actually quite good and the sale at Loblaws is excellent value.
Deal Addict
Nov 27, 2003
1859 posts
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Wow. The misinformation in this thread!

- get a leave-in meat thermometer timing by weight is a good way to miss your done-ness
- searing does not "lock in juices"
- if you age...don't wrap in saran, just let it age in your fridge out in the open, some debate about salting during an age. I prefer to not.
- water in ovens does not "increase the meat's moisture". water pans in bbq's, smokers, and ovens serve to stabilize the temperate in the cooking area, and sometimes to cook faster. Moisture is not locked in by a steamy or moist environment. That's a myth.
- searing at the beginning is old-school thinking, and generally results in a roast that has too much of an over-cook ring to it. Reverse searing is the best way to cook roasts (or turkey etc). Low-ish temperate for the duration of the cook. Rest until ready to eat. Then blast the roast at max temperature for 5 minutes to get the crust.


One of the best over-views I have seen is the following. Long read, but worth it.

http://mobile.seriouseats.com/2009/12/t ... e-rib.html
Jr. Member
Apr 29, 2009
160 posts
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Ladysmith
Sorry i should have clarified. If the roast is over 5 lb then the above applies. Med = about 5 hours. Under 5 lb everything goes down.
Jr. Member
Apr 29, 2009
160 posts
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Ladysmith
MacBuster wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2012 7:05 pm
Wow. The misinformation in this thread!

- get a leave-in meat thermometer timing by weight is a good way to miss your done-ness
- searing does not "lock in juices"
- if you age...don't wrap in saran, just let it age in your fridge out in the open, some debate about salting during an age. I prefer to not.
- water in ovens does not "increase the meat's moisture". water pans in bbq's, smokers, and ovens serve to stabilize the temperate in the cooking area, and sometimes to cook faster. Moisture is not locked in by a steamy or moist environment. That's a myth.
- searing at the beginning is old-school thinking, and generally results in a roast that has too much of an over-cook ring to it. Reverse searing is the best way to cook roasts (or turkey etc). Low-ish temperate for the duration of the cook. Rest until ready to eat. Then blast the roast at max temperature for 5 minutes to get the crust.


One of the best over-views I have seen is the following. Long read, but worth it.

http://mobile.seriouseats.com/2009/12/t ... e-rib.html
I suppose a leave in thermometer would work but when you cook ten 8-14 pounders at a time it doesn't work.

I agree don't sear. No point.

The Saran wrapped tight does serve a purpose. This does assume the roast is properly aged. The tight wrap forces the spices into the roast. Wrap it tight.

I've easily cooked several thousand roasts myself......
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