Students

Prioritize convenience or co op when choosing a college?

[OP]
Newbie
Feb 11, 2018
2 posts
2 upvotes

Prioritize convenience or co op when choosing a college?

Gonna save the sob story about how I can't go to uni and am stuck choosing between colleges instead.


My question is will co op really make a difference? After all, a college is a college, how much if a difference will a small Co op even make compared to someone doing a uni degree...


I like right in the heart of downtown and George brown is like 5 minutes away. They have no co op. Seneca is an hour away, they have co op options.

Which would be a better option? I'm not even sure if I have it in me to transfer to a university, so I don't even know what my pathway is looking like at the moment. Need advice if possible. Thanks.
13 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
1719 posts
442 upvotes
Woodbridge
AndrewS360461 wrote:
Feb 12th, 2018 6:12 pm
Gonna save the sob story about how I can't go to uni and am stuck choosing between colleges instead.
Shouldn't be a sob story at all. Gone are the days that a university degree was your ticket to a good career. If my furnace breaks down in -20 temperatures, I'd take a high school dropout HVAC technician over a Ph.D. in Engineering any day. If my pipes burst and water is flooding my basement I could care less how many letters my plumber has after their name. Here are some other great jobs that don't require a degree - https://globalnews.ca/news/3704532/top- ... da-indeed/

Co-op is a great way to get your foot in the workplace for when you graduate. You'd be surprised how few Canadians actually have a university degree. This article has some interesting stats - https://www.thestar.com/news/immigratio ... tries.html

What type of work do you see yourself doing? What type of field? What program(s) are you considering? All of that information will help determine if getting co-op experience is helpful or not.

P.S. Try not to look at college as a failure or a consolation prize. The fact that you are able to access any post-secondary studies is something to be proud of, and will open doors, oftentimes more profitable doors than many basic university degrees (you'd be surprised how many college students go into college with a university degree). Not everyone has the opportunity to even go to college.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 13, 2012
2633 posts
522 upvotes
Toronto
Many university degrees are pretty much useless anyways as the grads can't even get a relevant jobs after getting a degree.
¯\_(・_・)_/¯
This line is heavy..
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 11, 2018
2 posts
2 upvotes
I've been accepted to Gb, Humber and Seneca already for computer programming. Seneca and Humber both have co op options while Gb doesn't seem to. Im not even quite sure why I left Humber out of the topic... As an aside, thoughts on Humber for computer programming?

I've been told that in the grand scheme of things, the job prospects for those coming out of any college are all relatively the same. Will that extra co op placement truly make a difference for me, or should I save the hour commute and just settle down at Gb?

And I realize that unis are just degree mills unless you are into some heavy stem stuff, but I fell into huge bouts of depression and anxiety as a result of being surrounded by people who praised uni and belittled those who even considered college as a pathway, so please sympathize with me when I consider my situation a sob story in a sense. Cause it really did break me and my entire outlook on life, and I'm currently doing my best to recover as best I can.

Thanks for the advice!
Jr. Member
Dec 13, 2017
106 posts
76 upvotes
Its simple....if you want a job after you graduate do CO-Op
Jr. Member
Sep 2, 2015
106 posts
21 upvotes
East York, ON
AndrewS360461 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 5:18 am
I've been told that in the grand scheme of things, the job prospects for those coming out of any college are all relatively the same. Will that extra co op placement truly make a difference for me, or should I save the hour commute and just settle down at Gb?
Yes, it makes a difference in getting your first job.

BUT, I'd advise you to become an entrepreneur. Especially with programming you can code and sell apps on your own. A 1 hour commute is soul crushing, it tipped me into heavy depression and i flunked out of rye high when i went there after graduating high school. I'd go to humber and use the time i save from the commute to pick up some entrepreneurship skills.
Newbie
Jan 13, 2017
89 posts
24 upvotes
Co-op or no co-op?

Depends on the individual. If you pick a program that offers co-op, it doesn't guarantee you will get co-op. Back in the old days, you need a good GPA in order to become a co-op student. I'm not sure if the process is still the same. A long time ago, if 100 students were accepted to a program that offer co-op. Only a small portion of students actually did co-op and gain value work experience. If you know you work hard and believe that you will get co-op, then pick the co-op program.

Otherwise I will go with closer commute. If you choose closer college, make sure you find jobs on your own and make a lot of connections.
Newbie
Aug 7, 2015
49 posts
8 upvotes
Ottawa
Seneca's computer programming diploma is good I heard. You're talking about CTY and CPA which comes with co-op. I think you should take it, not an easy program but pays well one you graduate.
Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16463 posts
2108 upvotes
AndrewS360461 wrote:
Feb 12th, 2018 6:12 pm
I like right in the heart of downtown and George brown is like 5 minutes away. They have no co op. Seneca is an hour away, they have co op options.
Co-op will make your post-college life a lot easier. Short term pain, long term gain!

AndrewS360461 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 5:18 am
I've been told that in the grand scheme of things, the job prospects for those coming out of any college are all relatively the same. Will that extra co op placement truly make a difference for me, or should I save the hour commute and just settle down at Gb?
It makes getting your first job a lot easier - you'll have a padded resume.
Deal Addict
Mar 16, 2015
1322 posts
165 upvotes
Winnipeg
These kind of thread directly relate with me also.
I have got a relative who wants to come to Canada after grade12. We are heavily debating between college and uni.
4 years are long. Is it possible that he can get an entry level job right after college diploma ( 2 years) It is more important for an international student because he can not get permanent residense without a job...
Deal Expert
User avatar
Apr 21, 2004
44892 posts
11567 upvotes
This thread is reinforcing my belief that programs with co-op would be the way to go, unless it's some like Ivey or Rotman business (non co-op) we get into.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2009
1099 posts
358 upvotes
Toronto
Do a program that has co-op. Grades aren't important now days nor are degrees, as anyone can get a degree easily.

Work experience and networking is what matters and by getting into a co-op program you have a huge advantage over most people in your year. (In my year there were ~ 400 students and only 70 got into the co-op program).

I went through Ryerson's co-op program and have worked at 3 large banks in cyber security, I finished all 5 co-op terms (4 months long each) and by keeping in touch with managers I managed to get a great job in cyber security.

I haven't even graduated yet as I have a few courses left but I accepted a 1 year offer, after which they'll let me go back to school for 2 semesters, graduate, and come back.

A lot of people opt to do the non co-op program so they graduate faster, but then they sit around on their ass at home for a year or two looking for a job that will pay a lot lower as they have no experience.

Whereas someone that has gone through a co-op program, has a year or two of work experience that has just graduated will get a much higher starting salary.

Co-op is also a great way to meet a lot of people in the industry and network with them, keep in touch with managers, and when a job opens up, you'll have a better shot at getting it.

I can't speak for other industries but in the tech field, a lot of the other co-ops I've met, were from Seneca and George Brown. So they probably have a pretty good co-op program.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Mar 24, 2016
153 posts
10 upvotes
Has anyone heard about the co-op program at york dale adult school?
Newbie
Dec 16, 2012
66 posts
14 upvotes
Definitely do co-op. Even if it's a short placement, the work experience you will gain will look great on a resume. In some cases they will hire you full time if they like you. Don't feel bad about not getting into university. Just work hard and get real world experience.

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