Parenting & Family

Private Schools - Would you send your kid if you had the money?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 8th, 2018 4:47 pm
Sr. Member
Dec 4, 2016
884 posts
317 upvotes
If someone else is paying the tuition, then yes, I would send my child to a private school, especially if FI rates the school as better than any public school. Otherwise I try to live in a smaller house in a good school district. Teachers in private schools are not that much better the ones in public schools. They might be less protected by unions, but the pool of good teachers is not that huge anyway. You're mostly paying for classmates.
Sr. Member
Dec 4, 2016
884 posts
317 upvotes
blue dragon wrote:
Oct 4th, 2018 7:47 am
Bumping this thread. Living in an area where the highschools are consistenly in the bottom half of the Fraiser Institue rankings means that I am considering private schools for my girls.
To those who have gone the private school route, what are your current thoughts on the schools? Did they achieve the objectives you enrolled your kids for?
Since you seem to have more than one child, is moving an option? High schools in bottom half of FI ranking would definitely cause me to take drastic actions.
Jr. Member
Jun 21, 2009
124 posts
117 upvotes
I did the math, it would cost more to move than to pay for schooling.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 29, 2008
3027 posts
339 upvotes
blue dragon wrote:
Oct 4th, 2018 7:47 am
Bumping this thread. Living in an area where the highschools are consistenly in the bottom half of the Fraiser Institue rankings means that I am considering private schools for my girls.
To those who have gone the private school route, what are your current thoughts on the schools? Did they achieve the objectives you enrolled your kids for?
It’s been a few years for us now and we’re happy with the decision. Every once in a while I get turned off by some snottiness by a parent but by and large we’re pretty happy.
Deal Addict
Nov 13, 2013
1364 posts
521 upvotes
OTTAWA
blue dragon wrote:
Oct 4th, 2018 2:38 pm
I did the math, it would cost more to move than to pay for schooling.
This can make private school a good option. Otherwise even if you have the money it is really hard to justify. It really is a ton of money. With a little luck the same amount of money invested might let you buy a house outright for your kids at age 30. In the end though if it makes you happy and feel like you are giving your kids the best shot they have it is worth every penny.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
1920 posts
483 upvotes
Woodbridge
I guess it depends on why you're worried about a low ranked school. Is it social reasons? Access to resources? Access to extracurriculars? Distractions/behaviours? Academically speaking, if you have the resources to send your child to private school then you likely have the capacity to provide them with the resources they need to do well even in a poorly ranked high school. A 98 from the lowest FI ranked school will still get you into any program at any university in this country.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 17, 2002
6726 posts
418 upvotes
Toronto
We actually live closer to a high school (Ursula Franklin Academy or UFA) than our regular TDSB school in our catchment. UFA is a highly rated TDSB high school that accepts students from across Toronto but students have to meet their standards for admission. I don't know if there are others in Toronto or other cities, but maybe that is an option for some.
Newbie
Nov 9, 2008
33 posts
14 upvotes
Toronto
Yes, but I could not find a good one in Scarbouogh.
Member
Jan 13, 2007
288 posts
166 upvotes
Toronto, Ontario
blue dragon wrote:
Oct 4th, 2018 2:38 pm
I did the math, it would cost more to move than to pay for schooling.
I've talked to numerous friends about these 2 options as well and the cost-benefit weighs on multiple factors.

For those who are already in a decent catchment, the cost to justify sending your kids to private school will likely be debatable. The decision will largely depend on the family's finances, i.e. our friends who fall in this category that still choose private school are generally well-off financially and aren't sacrificing too much elsewhere to make private school work for them.

I'd say maybe half of them who are already living in good school neighborhoods opt for the public school system while the other half choose the private route.

For those who are not in a great public school neighborhood, the debate between private school versus moving to a better neighborhood always comes up. Many of them have done the Excel calculations too to determine what the costs end up being for either options.

The biggest factor here is how much they can realize from their current property and how much more they would need to add to their current mortgage to make that move. It's a tough one as some friends have added at least $500k to their existing mortgage to do so while for others, that number would theoretically be in the $500k to $1M range to make that happen.

With a child's education being about 12 years from primary school to high school, private school certainly wins over moving if you only have 1 child. Once you have 2 kids at, say, $30k per year per child, it's almost equivalent to moving.

Then comes the subjective benefits of being able to live in a better neighborhood for at least 12 years, associating with that community and those community members...versus the subjective benefits of surrounding your kids with private school classmates, enabling them to make friends outside of your neighborhood and anticipating greater attention to your child's education via lower class ratios.
Sr. Member
Dec 4, 2016
884 posts
317 upvotes
woofster wrote:
Oct 6th, 2018 9:25 am
I've talked to numerous friends about these 2 options as well and the cost-benefit weighs on multiple factors.

For those who are already in a decent catchment, the cost to justify sending your kids to private school will likely be debatable. The decision will largely depend on the family's finances, i.e. our friends who fall in this category that still choose private school are generally well-off financially and aren't sacrificing too much elsewhere to make private school work for them.

I'd say maybe half of them who are already living in good school neighborhoods opt for the public school system while the other half choose the private route.

For those who are not in a great public school neighborhood, the debate between private school versus moving to a better neighborhood always comes up. Many of them have done the Excel calculations too to determine what the costs end up being for either options.

The biggest factor here is how much they can realize from their current property and how much more they would need to add to their current mortgage to make that move. It's a tough one as some friends have added at least $500k to their existing mortgage to do so while for others, that number would theoretically be in the $500k to $1M range to make that happen.

With a child's education being about 12 years from primary school to high school, private school certainly wins over moving if you only have 1 child. Once you have 2 kids at, say, $30k per year per child, it's almost equivalent to moving.

Then comes the subjective benefits of being able to live in a better neighborhood for at least 12 years, associating with that community and those community members...versus the subjective benefits of surrounding your kids with private school classmates, enabling them to make friends outside of your neighborhood and anticipating greater attention to your child's education via lower class ratios.
In theory, you get some of that 500k back when your child finishes high school and you sell your house to move to a less desirable neighborhood.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2007
13015 posts
1600 upvotes
Private schools is not just about better education , it is also about other reasons and life long opportunities.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2009
6658 posts
3765 upvotes
If you wanna send to a private school, wait until maybe high school and send to a highly reputable private school if you got money to blow... though most public high schools are pretty good and considering you already pay for school through your property tax (SCHOOL ISNT FREE ANYWAYS) it doesnt make sense.

Most of the world has very poor public schools and hence why the rich will pay to put their kids in private school.

Luckily in Canada we have some of the best public schools on earth...so the requirement for private school isnt as much needed.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3630 posts
385 upvotes
Toronto
eldiablo wrote:
Oct 15th, 2018 11:22 pm
Private schools is not just about better education , it is also about other reasons and life long opportunities.
I would say it's more about exposing your kid to a selected peer group, more than anything. The education part is debatable. Private schools may have educational advantages in some domains, offset by disadvantages in others.
Newbie
Apr 28, 2016
10 posts
4 upvotes
No way. I want my kids to grow up with kids from all of society. Not just some kids who happen to have parents who consider theirselves elite and have money.
Sr. Member
Oct 17, 2002
634 posts
42 upvotes
Toronto
If you're already in a great district/catchment area, than probably not worth it (ie., top quartile or better).

I started a thread like this a while back, and to me it isnt about sending your kids to a school with snotty kids coming from elite parents. It's not even about sheltering your kids from others that come from poor families. It's all about surrounding your child with other children that come from families with the same mindset and attitude of learning and succeeding. I think this starts at an early age, and it's important to support them as much as possible. Yes of course, that starts in your own home, but let's face it... they'll be in school for the majority of the day, interacting with others.

I'm not going to get into the debate about ethnic groups, color of skin, etc... because you'll find those same groups also in more affluent areas, and they have no issues. But i think there's a very high correlation between school rankings and household income. And while I dont have any hard proof, but anecdotally there are likely more kids that succeed in life (university, good jobs, stable family, etc... ) from those that come out of schools with good rankings.

So back to the original question. If you're in an area with a below average ranking, then I would a) move or b) go the private school route.

Top