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Process of tearing down current house to build a new one

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  • Jun 7th, 2009 7:52 pm
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Newbie
Dec 13, 2007
74 posts
Toronto

Process of tearing down current house to build a new one

does anybody know what the process of tearing down a current house to build a new one on the same property is? has anybody done it before? I'm thinking of doing this instead of selling my old home and buying a new home somewhere else. I wanna see if it's cheaper or not.

also, does anybody know what the price range would be for doing this and rebuilding a new home with a garage, 3 to 4 bedrooms, and 2 to 3 bathrooms?

thanks
10 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 12, 2007
3004 posts
142 upvotes
Ottawa
We considered this. There may be circumstances where this would be the best financial course of action but there would have to be some significant shortcomings with the construction or design to justify this approach. You're looking at $200+ / sq. ft. (depending on finish grades and market conditions) plus demolition costs and the costs of living elsewhere while this is going on.

From a strictly financial perspective, you should sell and buy elsewhere if you can buy a place that meets your needs for less than what I'll call the "rebuild sum" (i.e. the demolition, rebuild, and temporary relocation costs + what you could get for your house in its present condition). Another consideration is whether your rebuilt house will ever recapture the rebuild sum when you go to resell it. If your place is already one of the nicer homes in your area, the smart advice would be to sell and move. If you're near the bottom of the market, there are fewer downsides to rebuilding.

If, OTOH, the rebuild sum is greater than the buy-sell equation, it may still makes sense to rebuild - if you really like your location and the financial difference between the two scenarios isn't too great a deterrent.

IMO
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2003
11056 posts
671 upvotes
Toronto
casablankaman427 wrote:
May 30th, 2009 11:57 pm
does anybody know what the process of tearing down a current house to build a new one on the same property is? has anybody done it before? I'm thinking of doing this instead of selling my old home and buying a new home somewhere else. I wanna see if it's cheaper or not.

also, does anybody know what the price range would be for doing this and rebuilding a new home with a garage, 3 to 4 bedrooms, and 2 to 3 bathrooms?

thanks
I would also consider the neighbourhood where the house will be located. Would it be the nicest house on the street? Do the city by-laws limit how much can be torn down? I see many houses in the East York where the side walls had to remain intact (i.e. not all of the walls could be torn down).
Deal Guru
Oct 6, 2005
14656 posts
1457 upvotes
casablankaman427 wrote:
May 30th, 2009 11:57 pm
does anybody know what the process of tearing down a current house to build a new one on the same property is? has anybody done it before? I'm thinking of doing this instead of selling my old home and buying a new home somewhere else. I wanna see if it's cheaper or not.

also, does anybody know what the price range would be for doing this and rebuilding a new home with a garage, 3 to 4 bedrooms, and 2 to 3 bathrooms?

thanks
Most likely it will be more expensive. Demolision alone will cost you a significant amount of money.

Building costs varies - depending on your budget and expectations.

Square footage prices are all over the map - but I think it's around 150.00/sq ft for an "average" home. However, consider this - some people are happy with a 20K kitchen, others expect a 50K+ kitchen. This alone skews the price of the house significantly...
Deal Addict
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Jan 2, 2009
1162 posts
73 upvotes
Red Deer
If the old house is still liveable and structually sound and still in good shape sell it for an dollar and move it off the foundation. Demolishing is expensive all the material has to be hauled away conrete and all. Plus you need new services dug in like new sewer line, more than likeley and that does not come cheap either , city hall should be able to give you those figures.

plus you need to get all sorts of permits etc.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 9, 2005
2955 posts
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Paris
Something like this is really all about location. For you, it may be exponentially more expensive. For us, it wasn't too bad. (That and having a builder in the family).

Will it increase the value of the property to cover the costs it will be to replace the home. Those costs will vary for many of things and it's not easy to give an estimate without knowing the wheres and whats and so forth.

That being said. If you really like where you are and really want a new home, then the finances may not be as important as they would be to someone else.

Costs can be much less, and the trouble with permits and such can be less a problem if you're looking to put the house in the same footprint. If not, then you'll need all sorts of proper permits which can cost, in addition to taking a potentially long time to get.

Demolition is the easier and cheaper part.
Kaboom! Kaboom! KABOOM!
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 13, 2007
74 posts
Toronto
Do i need to get signatures of consent from all my neighbours in order to tear down my house and build a new one?
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2003
11056 posts
671 upvotes
Toronto
casablankaman427 wrote:
Jun 7th, 2009 11:56 am
Do i need to get signatures of consent from all my neighbours in order to tear down my house and build a new one?
I would advise speaking to a person that is familiar with the city-bylaws. What you want to do may not be allowed under the by-laws.
Deal Addict
Dec 26, 2005
2796 posts
21 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
casablankaman427 wrote:
Jun 7th, 2009 11:56 am
Do i need to get signatures of consent from all my neighbours in order to tear down my house and build a new one?
No, if you meet all the zoning requirements, you can apply for a demolition and building permits, and it would not involve any neighbours.

If you were to exceed lot coverage or height regulations, than it may be necessary to apply to the Committee of Adjustment for a minor zoning variance and all the neighbours would be notified, a public meeting held, and the neighbours would have an opportunity to express either support of objection to what you are doing.

If the variance was not considered minor, or enough objections received as not fitting in with the neighbourhood, that variance would not be approved.

Best bet would be to review your idea with a planning consultant or architect familiar with this process. Either should be able to point out any limitations you will encounter better than anyone here.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 13, 2007
74 posts
Toronto
Whitedart wrote:
Jun 7th, 2009 4:49 pm
No, if you meet all the zoning requirements, you can apply for a demolition and building permits, and it would not involve any neighbours.

If you were to exceed lot coverage or height regulations, than it may be necessary to apply to the Committee of Adjustment for a minor zoning variance and all the neighbours would be notified, a public meeting held, and the neighbours would have an opportunity to express either support of objection to what you are doing.

If the variance was not considered minor, or enough objections received as not fitting in with the neighbourhood, that variance would not be approved.

Best bet would be to review your idea with a planning consultant or architect familiar with this process. Either should be able to point out any limitations you will encounter better than anyone here.
That's the kinda answer I was looking for... thanks! :) Is there a website where I can get this info from... i tried searching on google to no avail
Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2006
4150 posts
268 upvotes
Burlington, Ontario
I have someone that can take care of the entire process for you including what you can / cannot do, all the permits, etc.. I don't know what his consulting fee is, but PM me your info and I can pass it along.
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