Shopping Discussion

Product shrinkage and price increases. Why and how?!

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 14th, 2010 7:12 pm
Tags:
None
Deal Addict
Oct 9, 2005
1839 posts
189 upvotes
TheRed wrote:
Sep 12th, 2010 6:58 pm
It's like saying, if you don't like HST or tax increases, then don't live in Canada. If you pay taxes, then it means you are OK with the changes. If you don't pay taxes,...oh well...go south?

We're talking about products here, not taxes. Instead of buying Tropicana, you can buy something else, or buy apple juice or water instead. If Tropicana increases their prices and/or product sizes and you continue to buy their product, obviously the price is not too high for you, nor is the product size too small for the price. If it were, simple economics dictates that you would stop buying the product.

And in fact, yeah, if you don't like the HST, you can move elsewhere, such as to the prairies or out of the country. Obviously there are other reasons why you would want to stay put that outweigh HST implementation, otherwise you would have been gone by now. It must not bother you *that* much.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 23, 2010
988 posts
88 upvotes
inflation? lol

i remember when you could get a dozen KFC pieces for $12.99 :cry:
Contests Won: None :mad:
Deal Guru
User avatar
Oct 14, 2003
14224 posts
1094 upvotes
I find it hilarious that there are so many threads on this topic. Get this... this isn't something new, it's been going on for YEARS. I remember a Street Cents episode on this in the early 90s, and I'm sure it was happening even before that. Costs go up, that means either that price of the item has to go up, the quality goes down, or the quantity goes down. In most cases it's been determined that consumers generally prefer the quantity going down. There is nothing shady about it unless you don't understand numbers.
Science
is the new
rock 'n'
roll.
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2005
1528 posts
182 upvotes
Burnaby
Ojam wrote:
Sep 12th, 2010 10:17 pm
I find it hilarious that there are so many threads on this topic. Get this... this isn't something new, it's been going on for YEARS. I remember a Street Cents episode on this in the early 90s, and I'm sure it was happening even before that. Costs go up, that means either that price of the item has to go up, the quality goes down, or the quantity goes down. In most cases it's been determined that consumers generally prefer the quantity going down. There is nothing shady about it unless you don't understand numbers.
Still, I wish they'd limit things to just raising the prices and NOT screwing with the sizes. Okay, a carton of ice cream has gone up quite a bit in the last couple of years, but keep it 2L, not 1.69423L or whatever the hell it is this month . . . and now they're even making different flavors in different sizes yet. Yes, most of us will grumble that prices are going up, but don't treat us like complete dorks by hoping we won't notice or care about the downsizing. As these and other threads are making abundantly clear, we DO notice and we don't like it.

Hello, megaconglomerates . . . are you listening???

PS: Since we're also talking quality and I used ice cream as an example, I might as well rant for a moment about how I think Unliver sucks bigtime. Have you noticed that most of their Breyers products aren't even called "Ice Cream" any more? Now they're just "Frozen Desert". They do still have one actual ice cream product line, Breyers Double Churn, so now they've taken to labelling that prominently as "REAL ICE CREAM". Like we're supposed to be all astonished and grateful that the product is REAL!

Damned megaconglomerates.
Newbie
Sep 12, 2010
8 posts
Westcoast
* Been visiting this site in recent years, and this is my very first REDFLAGDEALS forum post (as I just registered a few minutes ago).

Yes ... been noticing this quite a bit of late as I'm savvy to the prices/sizes of the products I've been buying over the years (and their immediate competition as far as other brands and such).

I pretty much just stop buying the product altogether as it just doesn't feel right.

Superstore (WEST):


President's Choice - Blue Menu - Just Peanuts - Crunchy - peanut butter - excellent stuff. 1kg size. It's been priced at $2.29 - $4.99 the past few years. I'd usually wait for it to be in the $2.29 - 3.49 range to buy any. Now they've marked down the few varieties of that particular product to 750g, and it's priced at $3.39/3.49 - 4-something in recent months. No thanks!

Nature's Path - ECO-PAC - Heritage Flakes - 907g
They were $4.99 for a year or so, give or take a few months
Now they're $8.69 ... whereas their boxed products have always been pretty much steady/pricier.



http://reviews.presidentschoice.ca/6584 ... eviews.htm

http://www.naturespath.com/products/eco ... &nutri=All

http://www.naturespath.com/
Newbie
Sep 12, 2010
8 posts
Westcoast
Cheap Cat wrote:
Sep 12th, 2010 5:35 pm
Some changes are just very inconvenient. I feel like I am constantly changing the toilet paper roll and I live alone. I can't imagine how many rolls a large family goes through. The rolls are so small now even when you buy the double rolls. I'd rather they raise the price than make the rolls any smaller. You can say the same for a variety of other products.


Another thing that's ridiculous too (as with most products these days) is that it becomes a task just trying to select a brand/package. You go to the T.P. section ... or see a sale ... but you stand there for a few minutes trying to see if you're getting a good deal (in comparison to all the other sizes/2-ply/3-ply/whatever-the-heck varieties out there). You're right too ... couldn't imagine the costs alot of large families go through (with such a necessity) ... especially if plenty of kids are around, as kids go through toilet paper as if it's going out of style :lol:
Deal Addict
Apr 8, 2010
1307 posts
62 upvotes
Burlington
Ojam wrote:
Sep 12th, 2010 10:17 pm
I find it hilarious that there are so many threads on this topic. Get this... this isn't something new, it's been going on for YEARS. I remember a Street Cents episode on this in the early 90s, and I'm sure it was happening even before that. Costs go up, that means either that price of the item has to go up, the quality goes down, or the quantity goes down. In most cases it's been determined that consumers generally prefer the quantity going down. There is nothing shady about it unless you don't understand numbers.

This. And it works both ways. Coke increased portion sizes in the 80's after the switch to corn syrup drastically reduced manufacturing costs.
Deal Addict
Mar 16, 2007
2526 posts
59 upvotes
I think that we're all (Canada and US) spoiled with prices. We're so used to get everything dirt cheap compared to the rest of the world. Everything we buy is made in factories and usually through slave-like labour. How much cheaper can it get?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
May 25, 2009
7949 posts
1022 upvotes
How can companies do this?

Welcome to the world of capitalism.
"God's in His heaven. All's right with the world." - Robert Browning (1812-1889)
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 17, 2007
3640 posts
754 upvotes
Burnaby
It's most noticeable in cereal. $4.99 for a box that serves maybe, what, 3 bowls? It's probably cheaper to buy waffles and bacon than eat your daily Special K. Cookie packaging has done it too-with those partitioned boxes they sit in, you only get about 2 dozen cookies for the old price of 3x that amount. My grocery bill is probably 2x what it was 2 years ago, and I buy a lot less.
Member
User avatar
Jan 21, 2009
392 posts
53 upvotes
Inflation perhaps? I have a friend that work in a grocery and from what he told me, a lot of people are making so many mess breaking up stuff, which goes to the insurance and it increases. Some products like eggs/milks so on that everyone need, they know that people will buy them so who not increasing the price. Stores have to make the most money of what they can. Capitalism..
Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2010
4639 posts
1438 upvotes
Toronto
If either prices have to go up or products get smaller, I would much rather products get smaller. What's that commercial on TV for ziploc or something that says half the food bought by Canadians gets wasted? No idea if it's true or not, but if you're not a family a lot of products are simply too big. Then you have to spend money on things like ziploc bags and fiddle around with freezing stuff and thawing stuff and finding places to hide big bottles in a small space. Obviously we'd all rather that things stay the same, but if something absolutely has to change then I'd rather get a bit less for my money than have my bills go up for stuff that I don't really need all of, but have to buy anyway because the markup on smaller sized products is even more ridiculous.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
May 11, 2008
9421 posts
450 upvotes
Say ACME company produces thingamajiggies. To make that thingamajiggie, the need a watchamacallit. Everyone's wages increase with inflation amongst other things. Now the cost to produce a watchamacallit goes up so they charge more. So to make a thingamajiggies, ACME pays more salary to the workers AND for the watchamacallit. ACME either raises prices or reduces the size of the
thingamajiggies to make the same amount of profit as before.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Aug 20, 2005
10453 posts
2020 upvotes
Nowhere
Ottomaddox wrote:
Sep 12th, 2010 7:00 pm
A Big Mac in Canada and the US has always been the same size.

Darn, that is one product I wouldn't mind being smaller. I also wouldn't mind if restaurant portion sizes would shrink with a corresponding price decrease. It would be nice to actually be able to eat my whole meal and perhaps even have dessert instead of feeling like a stuffed pig and taking half my food home.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Aug 20, 2005
10453 posts
2020 upvotes
Nowhere
No one is disputing inflation. I'd rather have prices go up, than the product shrinking. In some cases now, you need two packages to equal one old package. This actually adds to the costs through increased packaging costs, handling costs etc. Stores need more space to display the products, more place to store them etc. Not to mention the environmental effects of all this.

Top