Food & Drink

Prosciutto vs Jamon Iberico

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 12th, 2018 11:01 am
Tags:
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
31153 posts
5890 upvotes
Ottawa
GoodFellaz wrote:
Nov 6th, 2018 2:11 pm
So I did not know the spanish call their prosciutto Jambon. I was watching that spanish dude on TLN who goes around to places in spain and mexico and he was eating some of that prosciutto but the name on the ham leg said Jambon or something like that (you guys on here call it Jambon Ibierico or something like that) so yeah its the same type of ham, but in spain I guess they call it something other than prosciutto. Even here in Canada when I go to the deli, they carry Prosciutto, but not that Jambon stuff. so I guess Prosciutto is the winner here.
Jamon is Spanish for ham. Jambon is French for ham. Prosciutto is an talian dry-cured ham.
In the 21st Century deleting history has become far more important than making it. Anonymous
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 24, 2015
1689 posts
262 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
thank you by the way, just some helpful advice, italians already know what prosciutto is since they are 1 years old. and Jamon or Jambon or however you spell it, Jam On! its all the same animal no matter how you slice it up
Hi
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 3, 2009
5298 posts
740 upvotes
Toronto
antihero wrote:
Nov 6th, 2018 3:29 am
I see what you're getting at, but I think there is a bit of a flaw in your comparison of the Boquiera to the other tourist attractions. Generally Sagrada Familia (debatable as it is still not complete!) and Park Guell only have so much ability to change and so whether or not more tourists visit will not impact its intrinsic value. The markets are another thing. The vendors and what they sell and the quality and price of things tend to change when more tourists visit. Unfortunately many vendors, realize that transactions with tourists are often a one-time game, and so they do not care and quality diminishes and price goes up.

Boquiera while not exactly Lundy's Lane, is a far cry from where any local would shop in Barcelona. My ex (from almost 10 yrs ago) said no locals ever shop there, and back then was mostly British tourists. She wasn't sure why that particular market was the one tourists gravitated towards, except for its proximity to Las Ramblas. I liken it to St. Lawrence Market in Toronto. Seen SLM rated as one of the top markets in world, but I lived about a block and half away and rarely shopped there - and on the rare occasions I did go there it was 90% tourists. Perhaps you like prosciutto better because you've never tried the really good jamon, which is generally not sold in Boquiera.

Even Santa Caterina market which has become so touristy in recent years still is a much better option. L'Abaceria is probably my favourite.

I think another generally is not to romanticize these places, which make for great pictures and sometimes tales, and judge them by whether or not locals shop at them. I would love to know what a survey of how many people shop at St. Lawrence Market on a regular basis would look like. ( Most of the people in my condo near there would be going up the elevator with Metro grocery bags)
I live around SLM too, and it has become a tourist area....not necessarily a "trap" but I know people that have worked there for 10+ years and sales at most places have declined. So you're right, locals aren't shopping there much. There still is a crowd that makes trips there early Saturday mornings, but some places will likely be closing down soon. Will it become more of a trap? Who knows...maybe in 10 years more like Chelsea Market in NYC with renovations.
Remember to be an RFD-er and NOT a degenerate.
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
31153 posts
5890 upvotes
Ottawa
No Frills wrote:
Nov 6th, 2018 6:25 pm
I live around SLM too, and it has become a tourist area....not necessarily a "trap" but I know people that have worked there for 10+ years and sales at most places have declined. So you're right, locals aren't shopping there much. There still is a crowd that makes trips there early Saturday mornings, but some places will likely be closing down soon. Will it become more of a trap? Who knows...maybe in 10 years more like Chelsea Market in NYC with renovations.
Bottom line, and I agree with most of what you say, if the market becomes tourist spot, then yes, sales decline and stalls close or go out of business because they rely on sales of fresh product. Tourists do not buy fresh products.
Boquiera though, is open, vibrant and selling lots of fresh products so, someone must be buying to keep it open?
In the 21st Century deleting history has become far more important than making it. Anonymous
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
31153 posts
5890 upvotes
Ottawa
GoodFellaz wrote:
Nov 6th, 2018 3:27 pm
thank you by the way, just some helpful advice, italians already know what prosciutto is since they are 1 years old. and Jamon or Jambon or however you spell it, Jam On! its all the same animal no matter how you slice it up
I believe the differences are also in how the animal is raised and what it is fed, how it is butchered and cured. There really are differences in flavours of the ham.
In the 21st Century deleting history has become far more important than making it. Anonymous
Sr. Member
May 7, 2008
576 posts
183 upvotes
Toronto
I see your point about fresh foods. I'm not sure how they do it, but back to my example of St. Lawrence Market - if you're ever in Toronto, just go by on any given day, and it's mostly tourists. I constantly wonder where all the fresh food goes. I know certain vendors have other locations, which may account for where some of the fresh food eventually goes. I imagine that they charge a tourist premium for all their goods to cover the waste and spoilage. For that matter, I'm not even sure how a regular supermarket ever sells the majority of their fresh food.

I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic, but St. Lawrence Market is reasonably well-known.
https://www.cnn.com/2012/07/17/travel/w ... index.html

Anyhow, I would say that Boqueira is still geared towards capturing tourist dollars, and there is a reasonable disdain and loathing by locals for the place.
Pete_Coach wrote:
Nov 6th, 2018 8:04 am
My point was a tourist "trap" is only that because people wish to see it, regardless of what attraction it is. My response was to another poster claiming Mercado Boqueria was nothing but a tourist trap.
As for locals not shopping in the Boquiera, does your wife or you actually think that tourists are the source of income and livelihood for this huge place year round? Do you think in any way that it is the tourist that buy the fresh vegetables, fresh chicken, nuts, fresh meats, the offal, the cheeses, the fish and so on that are sold in this market? I don't think so. Tourists from cruise ships or staying in he hotels don't make those purchases especially in the winter. The market is open year round to serve the local public. As an aside, or maybe to prove my point, Mercat de la Boqueria, has been a market for a very long time. Long before tourists visiting La Rambla area . It opened in the 1200's and has been a continual market since....not living off tourist dollars.
L'Abaceria and Santa Caterina are also fresh food markets. What makes them better? They have the same products....oh wait, they serve the local market area too. Point is, all 3 have tourists visit them but all 3 are there and serve the local people fresh foods. Boqueria may get more tourists but that is purely because of location. Oh and we liked Mercat Abaceria too but we were only there because we were wandering around the Gracia area and got hungry.
As for liking prosciutto vs jamon, I have been all over Italy as well as Spain so, I do know the difference in the countries and a number of their products .I am very familiar with jamon, just as I am with prosciutto and prefer prosciutto. Oh and there are several stalls selling jamons in the Boqueria, as well as tapas spots that sold it.
Lastly, St Lawrence Market? Don't know it , never heard of it and why would I go there? You don't even go and you live nearby...is it tourists that keep this "one of the top markets in world, "open? I think not. Again, do tourist buy fresh vegetables? Meats? Fish? Cheeses? Pastas? and so on? No, it is the locals that take the products home and cook them, not tourists that take it to their hotels or stuff them in their suitcases and drive or fly home.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
39242 posts
3518 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
hyperactiveme wrote:
Nov 5th, 2018 4:12 pm
You luckier than me then. This is what it should look like
prosciutto.di_.cinta_.senese.jpg
vs what you get most times
20130812-ham-tasting-di-palo.jpg
Pete_Coach wrote:
Nov 5th, 2018 4:33 pm
Not where I buy it. Never seen it like that. You sure it is even prosciutto?
Thats how it looks like when you get it from loblaws... They trim a lot of the fat off. So it depends on the skill and technique of the employee...

That nice fatty looking one? I notice its always like that if you buy prepackaged prosciutto.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
39242 posts
3518 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
antihero wrote:
Nov 12th, 2018 3:19 am
I see your point about fresh foods. I'm not sure how they do it, but back to my example of St. Lawrence Market - if you're ever in Toronto, just go by on any given day, and it's mostly tourists. I constantly wonder where all the fresh food goes. I know certain vendors have other locations, which may account for where some of the fresh food eventually goes. I imagine that they charge a tourist premium for all their goods to cover the waste and spoilage. For that matter, I'm not even sure how a regular supermarket ever sells the majority of their fresh food.

I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic, but St. Lawrence Market is reasonably well-known.
https://www.cnn.com/2012/07/17/travel/w ... index.html

Anyhow, I would say that Boqueira is still geared towards capturing tourist dollars, and there is a reasonable disdain and loathing by locals for the place.
I have a theory... and there is some truth to it...

Chickens about to expire? Throw it into the rotisserie...
Ground beef looking too brown? Chili is the new soup of the day...
Veggies bruised? Vegetable soup is offered everyday for our vegan customers...

Top