Shopping Discussion

Purolator driver SIGNED and LEFT my LAPTOP on my doorstep and NOW ITS MISSING

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 18th, 2019 6:23 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 25, 2009
17 posts
9 upvotes
Toronto

Purolator driver SIGNED and LEFT my LAPTOP on my doorstep and NOW ITS MISSING

I don't even know what to say at this point and I am beyond exhausted with dealing with their customer service department and case managers.

Here's what happened.

I was home all day on Monday expecting a laptop to come in as was my dad. I had to leave to pick something up across the street and received a notification stating
how it was received and signed. I immediately called my dad to ask if he had received anything and signed for a package. He had NOT. I immediately called Purolator to
figure out what on earth is happening and no one seems to know why and its been 4 days now and they have not figured out where the driver went via GPS. They did send me an email
to confirm the signature and insisted that one of us signed it. I viewed the signature and NO ONE in this household signs like that.

So 2019 started and I'm out a $2,000.00+ laptop.
81 replies
Sr. Member
Jan 10, 2009
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Worst case scenario, call your credit card company and get the money back. If Purolator and the sender can't assist you.
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Jul 12, 2003
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From where you purchase the laptop? Just have them deal with it. They are the sender. Call them and explain the issue, they will talk to the courier.
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is.legaspi20 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:18 pm
Purolator driver SIGNED and LEFT my LAPTOP on my doorstep and NOW ITS MISSING

I don't even know what to say at this point and I am beyond exhausted with dealing with their customer service department and case managers.

Here's what happened.

I was home all day on Monday expecting a laptop to come in as was my dad. I had to leave to pick something up across the street and received a notification stating
how it was received and signed. I immediately called my dad to ask if he had received anything and signed for a package. He had NOT. I immediately called Purolator to
figure out what on earth is happening and no one seems to know why and its been 4 days now and they have not figured out where the driver went via GPS. They did send me an email
to confirm the signature and insisted that one of us signed it. I viewed the signature and NO ONE in this household signs like that.

So 2019 started and I'm out a $2,000.00+ laptop.
There's a Purolator customer representative on the forums, @PurolatorHelp IINM. Maybe he/she can help you out with your issue.

The way for preventing these safe drop deliveries by Purolator (and other parcel couriers) is to be proactive. Once one gets the shipping notification with tracking ID, one should contact them to change delivery to a nearby "hold for pickup" location -- before any delivery attempt. For example, Purolator holds parcels at these locations for 5 days and one can pick the parcel up at a convenient time. You could check if there's a Purolator agent offering this service close to you at https://www.purolator.com/en/ship-track ... ation.page -- you have to click on "advanced search" to select the option to search locations offering "hold for pickup". Actually this should be the default option at Purolator. Unfortunately, Purolator either drop safe the parcels or send them to their warehouse after the first delivery attempt [these warehouses are always far away and are hard to reach. Picking parcels up there takes a lot of time and has more hassles.]
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The Canterbury Tail wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:31 pm
Worst case scenario, call your credit card company and get the money back. If Purolator and the sender can't assist you.
Why should a merchant be punished?

BTW, it would be extremely hard to win this chargeback as the item was signed for. He needs to go after Purolator and sue them in court for faking a signature.
Last edited by BiegeToyota on Jan 10th, 2019 6:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Dec 15, 2017
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The ones to blame for these mishaps are the bosses of these drivers. My friend works as a UPS driver and he does between 80 to 100 deliveries a day. Multiply that by waiting 3 mins for someone to answer the door or sign. Thats 300 mins lost in production.
Last edited by MusicBox on Jan 10th, 2019 6:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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MusicBox wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:47 pm
Its these drivers bosses to blame for these mishaps. My friend works as a UPS driver and he does between 80 to 100 deliveries a day. Multiply that by waiting 3 mins for someone to answer the door or sign. Thats 300 mins lost in production.
Yes, Canada post, USPS, dhl, FedEx....all do the same.

Still no excuse to fake a signature.

I'd say see you in court.
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You should get a wyze cam, its $20 and you can just stick it next to your door assuming its a covered porch with an electrical outlet there.
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BiegeToyota wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:47 pm
Why should a merchant be punished?

BTW, it would be extremely hard to win this chargeback as the item was signed for. He needs to go after Purolator and sue them in court for faking a signature.
That's just false.

The merchant is always 100% responsible for making sure the item is received by the buyer. Purolator shouldn't even be dealing with the OP at all.

Chargeback and be done with it.
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superfresh89 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:55 pm
That's just false.

The merchant is always 100% responsible for making sure the item is received by the buyer. Purolator shouldn't even be dealing with the OP at all.

Chargeback and be done with it.
Wrong. There is a signature. Credit card will deny a chargeback.
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BiegeToyota wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 7:12 pm
Wrong. There is a signature. Credit card will deny a chargeback.
Nope, that makes it even easier. Fraud department will just request the cardholder's signature if not already on file, compare it against what Purolator provides, and complete the chargeback.
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superfresh89 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 7:18 pm
Nope, that makes it even easier. Fraud department will just request the cardholder's signature if not already on file, compare it against what Purolator provides, and complete the chargeback.
Interesting.
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superfresh89 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:55 pm

That's just false.

The merchant is always 100% responsible for making sure the item is received by the buyer. Purolator shouldn't even be dealing with the OP at all.

Chargeback and be done with it.
superfresh89 wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 7:18 pm

Nope, that makes it even easier. Fraud department will just request the cardholder's signature if not already on file, compare it against what Purolator provides, and complete the chargeback.
That's quite interesting. Judging by what RFDealers post about lost parcels, merchants seem to always refer buyers to the courier.

Is there any credit score implication or warning about using cc chargeback in these cases? I guess no one would want warnings and whatnots (about possible fraud) in their credit history if they use this method for a high value item (for example, a $2000 laptop) or more than one time.
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aviador wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 7:35 pm
That's quite interesting. Judging by what RFDealers post about lost parcels, merchants seem to always refer buyers to the courier.

Is there any credit score implications or warnings about using cc chargeback in these cases? I guess no one would want warnings and whatnots (about possible fraud) in their credit history if they use this method for a high value item (for example, a $2000 laptop) or more than one time.
A contract exists between buyer and seller. The seller is responsible for getting the item to the buyer.

The merchant has also contracted the courier to provide a service. If the courier does not complete the service, loses the item, or delivers the item to the wrong person, etc., they are responsible for making the merchant whole, assuming that the merchant signed a liability waiver and purchased insurance on the parcel.

No contract exists between the reciever and the courier; even if there is a successful investigation is completed, monies are owed to the sender and not the reciever. The merchant would then have to re-ship the item.

Chargebacks should not affect your credit rating at all. However, most credit card issues require at least an attempt of dispute resolution between the merchant and the buyer. So yes, you do need to contact the merchant first... If they won't cooperate, initiate a chargeback and explain that the merchant is not cooperating, and the item was not recieved.
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MusicBox wrote:
Jan 10th, 2019 6:47 pm
My friend works as a UPS driver and he does between 80 to 100 deliveries a day. Multiply that by waiting 3 mins for someone to answer the door or sign. Thats 300 mins lost in production.
I see that, but if the sender or the recipient pay extra to get it signed at the door at delivery. They should wait that 3 minutes, it is part of their job. No excuse just to leave it at the door step or sign it on his own.
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