Automotive

Putting Car in Neutral at Stop Light?

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eilrach wrote:
Feb 9th, 2010 11:14 pm
there you go... where i used to live they called these guys "clutch riders" :D ...

so in AT land, should i diligently put it into neutral as well? will the brakes get "eaten up" more if i keep it in D? [on the other hand, will my transmission wear down faster if i always shift to N on a red light?]...

strangely enough, i wish there was no automatic and all cars were manual, truth be told :D
As was said before, there wasn't a real benefit to putting an automatic into neutral (unless you are in a runaway Lexus). If the car stays in D, it can aid in braking (I think the Subaru I drove last year downshifted and you could feel it, but maybe that was in the sport mode where you can shift for yourself). Only the linkages or parts associated with you moving the shifter might wear out faster because you would definitely be using them 10 times more per day than the average person, however, I have never seen it done...
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thanks audidude... ok not a car expert so stupid question but am going to ask: how does "D" aid in braking? it seems counterintuitive...

as well, am a bit confused... by putting the AT in neutral, then yes the AT parts might break down more - is that what you are referring to in your earlier post? (eg. your statement "Only the linkages or parts associated with you moving the shifter might wear out faster because you would definitely be using them 10 times more per day than the average person, however, I have never seen it done...") ... but by not putting AT in neutral, then probably the brakes wear down more? am i right?
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eilrach wrote:
Feb 10th, 2010 12:12 am
thanks audidude... ok not a car expert so stupid question but am going to ask: how does "D" aid in braking? it seems counterintuitive...

as well, am a bit confused... by putting the AT in neutral, then yes the AT parts might break down more - is that what you are referring to in your earlier post? (eg. your statement "Only the linkages or parts associated with you moving the shifter might wear out faster because you would definitely be using them 10 times more per day than the average person, however, I have never seen it done...") ... but by not putting AT in neutral, then probably the brakes wear down more? am i right?
Because (and this is becoming less true with newer vehicles) the engine is still coupled to the wheels (very loosly due to fluid coupling) that creates drag and slows the car down. So when you lift off the throttle, the transmission will attempt to pass the momentum of the still moving car back to the engine. Imagine you trying to spin an engine by hand. This creates a drag, effectively aiding in braking which means less braking will need to be applied to slow the car down.

The linkages or parts associated with the action of you moving the shifter into N and back into D at every light will cause extra wear on those parts only, but not to vital internal components in the transmission.
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thanks audidude... ok i understand that by putting it in "D" it aids in braking prior to being on a full stop -- i thought you were referring to it aiding when it is on a full stop... LOL... yes, i definitely leave it in "D" prior to making a full stop... i dont "coast" to a red light... now for the more interesting topic which is once one is in a full stop already... you adviced that one should leave it in "D" and just depress the brake pedals? or do i shift it back to neutral (similar to how i do it in manual?)... i presume just keep it in "D" right? (since there is essentially no harm -- not even when you get bumped from the behind)...

ps. alex fretes does this (eg. shift to N in AT mode in red lights :)
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eilrach wrote:
Feb 10th, 2010 12:28 am
thanks audidude... ok i understand that by putting it in "D" it aids in braking prior to being on a full stop -- i thought you were referring to it aiding when it is on a full stop... LOL... yes, i definitely leave it in "D" prior to making a full stop... i dont "coast" to a red light... now for the more interesting topic which is once one is in a full stop already... you adviced that one should leave it in "D" and just depress the brake pedals? or do i shift it back to neutral (similar to how i do it in manual?)... i presume just keep it in "D" right? (since there is essentially no harm -- not even when you get bumped from the behind)...

ps. alex fretes does this (eg. shift to N in AT mode in red lights :)
Just hold the brake, and as it was said before some newer cars will put it into a neutral state for you, but if yours doesn't, there will be no damage and savings on gas is next to nothing.

Alex probably grew up driving stick and is bored , so he plays with the auto shifter. My dad used to do that and actually loosened the retaining pin from overuse (column mounted shift) so the lever fell off...
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haha... ok got it... will change my driving habits from today on... thanks! "D" it is even on full stop in traffic... thankfully im a lefty so i need more exercise in my right leg (on the brakes)... :)
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I use to keep my foot on the brake all the time at stoplights, but then I got tired of that and now put it in park if its a long red. Much better.
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I was taught (decades ago, mind you) that you need to keep the car in gear at a stoplight - for reasons that Audidude outlines plus the fact that, in an emergency situation, you might need to move suddenly - and the loss of the split second required to put the car in gear could be valuable. That caution has stuck with me all these years - whether the car had a stick or a slushbox.
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I was taught (decades ago, mind you) that you need to keep the car in gear at a stoplight - for reasons that Audidude outlines plus the fact that, in an emergency situation, you might need to move suddenly - and the loss of the split second required to put the car in gear could be valuable. That caution has stuck with me all these years - whether the car had a stick or a slushbox.

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When I ask about this a few weeks ago, I thought putting it on Neutral would REDUCE stress/cool the Transmission.

It was never about Brake Pads, being Tired or even Bored, I just figured it would help.

Some of my boys even noticed that I use my Left Feet. LOL
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AudiDude wrote:
Feb 9th, 2010 11:04 pm
As I said before depressing the clutch for extended periods of time can damage the pressure plate (well not damage, but wear it out prematurely making it difficult to shift). ...
Technically, pressing the clutch in for long periods of time wears out the "throw out" or "clutch release" bearing. It's the part that actually gets pressed against the pressure plate to separate the engine from the transmission.

Sometimes when you are idling a car a quiet traffic light, you can hear an "sqeeking" noise only when the clutch is pressed in. That's a sign of a worn throw out bearing.
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l69norm wrote:
Feb 10th, 2010 8:49 am
Technically, pressing the clutch in for long periods of time wears out the "throw out" or "clutch release" bearing. It's the part that actually gets pressed against the pressure plate to separate the engine from the transmission.

Sometimes when you are idling a car a quiet traffic light, you can hear an "sqeeking" noise only when the clutch is pressed in. That's a sign of a worn throw out bearing.
Well it can wear that out as well for sure, but an abused pressure plate usually makes it very hard to shift and can leave you stranded. The last person who owned my SHO did that. I could not provide enough force to get the car to shift because the fingers on the pressure plate were worn (bent is easier to understand for others), and the throwout bearing was fine. Most clutch riders cause that annoying throwout bearing squeek with their bad habits.
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MaximDude wrote:
Feb 10th, 2010 1:08 am
I use to keep my foot on the brake all the time at stoplights, but then I got tired of that and now put it in park if its a long red. Much better.
This is coming for a mechanic in the Philippines so I am not sure if it is authoritative but he said shifting to P is the worst.
http://www.topgear.com.ph/features/colu ... in-traffic

Another discussion with Post #2 saying shifting to N isn't bad for manual trannies:
http://forum.autos.sympatico.ca/powertr ... manual-car

This one says shifting to N may be more harmful over time:
http://www.cars.com/go/advice/Story.jsp ... ry=ydMyths

Maybe I should only shift to neutral when anticipating a stop for more than a minute (what most North Americans suggest).
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azncapcom wrote:
Feb 9th, 2010 4:50 pm
Just out of curiosity. Is it recommended to put car in neutral at a long stop light? Does it save gas? Is it legal? I read somewhere that in some places its illegal?

Can someone list the:
Advantages: Auto, Manual
Disadvantages: Auto, Manual

Also some people say if you put the car in neutral, it brakes faster? (Its not turning the wheels)

Others say that the engine helps in the braking process. (Therefore, never brake with neutral?)
Long stop lights in reality aren't that long - in my auto I just leave it in D till the light changes and leave it in neutral in my manual till the light changes.

If I'm on a long drive-thru wait, I'll usually pop the manual into neutral in any event & may put the auto in P.

Long wait at a railway crossing or lift bridge, either I'll usually pop the manual into neutral or put the auto in P, or shut engines off in both cases.
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Already mentioned to my wife to keep it in Drive, especially in stop and go traffic.

Yeah with manual, it seems there is less contention with leaving it in neutral.

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