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Pylex adjustable screw pile...anyone have experience with this product?

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  • Oct 14th, 2017 2:56 pm
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Newbie
Oct 8, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
Joist tape does also stop it from creaking. Yeah tighten em down that should do it for sure. Im also using 2 by 8s as decking so they wont move even if the screws arent tight.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Nov 18, 2005
10431 posts
1896 upvotes
Kingston
MattyS036804 wrote:
Oct 9th, 2017 6:29 pm

Built a whole deck using pylex. Used a few more than necessary to be safe but worked perfectly.
Way better than using sonitubes and will last forever. Watch the video. Shows every step of the way.
MattyS036804 wrote:
Oct 11th, 2017 9:10 am
Its deck joist tape to protect the tops. This deck will last 40 years!
I'm not a pro but have built a couple of substantial decks that have passed building inspection. I'm not saying this just to be critical, but I hope no one follows your approach/advice. I assume that you didn't get design approval or inspection from your municipality because there are a lot of obvious problems with the build (misuse of joist hangers, wrong joist hanger fasteners, ledger board screwed into bricks, misuse of deck screws in rim joists, unsupported deck board ends, joist/"beam" structure is a mess).

Use of pylex may be OK. I hope it works out for you but I would not recommend anyone follow your approach.
Newbie
Oct 8, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
Buddy you are completely off. Those hanger are right it is the right screw and the ledger board is ibetween bricks. And everything is to code and it was inspected. The beams changed a little during construction since i decided to use 2 by 8s as decking half way through but sure a jello this is done perfectly. I feel like youve never built anything and are just trolling. Ive also had a few deck builders come by and everyone is raving about it.
Deal Addict
Dec 17, 2007
1270 posts
430 upvotes
Alliston, ON
MattyS036804 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 9:05 am
Buddy you are completely off. Those hanger are right it is the right screw and the ledger board is ibetween bricks. And everything is to code and it was inspected. The beams changed a little during construction since i decided to use 2 by 8s as decking half way through but sure a jello this is done perfectly. I feel like youve never built anything and are just trolling. Ive also had a few deck builders come by and everyone is raving about it.
You used 2 different types of screws in the hangers, one of them is the proper Strong-Drive Connecter screw, not sure what the other one is with a torx head
Newbie
Oct 8, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
The one with the star shape head is a zinc plated structural 3.5 inch screw that ties the joist to the beam. That screw is perfectly suited to pressure treated wood and outdoor joist hangers. In fact its better than the typical joist screw and much stronger. the overall structure is a litle chaotic only because i switched design half way through - wanting to keep the deck low and using extra thick decking. This deck is the real mccoy and completely done right - maybe a little to structurally strong but thats ok.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
2873 posts
548 upvotes
Ottawa
MattyS036804 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 9:05 am
Buddy you are completely off. Those hanger are right it is the right screw and the ledger board is ibetween bricks. And everything is to code and it was inspected.
It's got to be no more than 20" off the ground. Curious why you didn't just make it free standing then you don't even have to worry about code or inspections.
Deal Addict
Dec 17, 2007
1270 posts
430 upvotes
Alliston, ON
MattyS036804 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2017 2:30 pm
The one with the star shape head is a zinc plated structural 3.5 inch screw that ties the joist to the beam. That screw is perfectly suited to pressure treated wood and outdoor joist hangers. In fact its better than the typical joist screw and much stronger. the overall structure is a litle chaotic only because i switched design half way through - wanting to keep the deck low and using extra thick decking. This deck is the real mccoy and completely done right - maybe a little to structurally strong but thats ok.
Those longer Torx head screws are to be used in place of lag bolts or to join piece's of wood together, Not for joist hangers. Simpson makes a 3" screw that is to be used for the joist hangers. They are the only ones approved for use in a joist hanger.
Newbie
Oct 8, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
completely incorrect - heres a quote from the pack - 'These RSC Renown gold-coated lumber lock screws have a high load capacity and are authorized substitute for hanger nails.'. In any event as long as no chemical reaction will happen and there is sufficient strength what they authorize or not i irrelevant. These are thicker and tougher than the typcial screws used in hangers.
Newbie
Oct 8, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
The soil by my house was fill and i didnt want to dig close or screw close to the foundation so i chose to attqched to a sill plate. Its a minor load for the structural brick on my house - so it should be more than fine. Also when the fill is disturbed around a house the screw pile doesnt get enough resistance - the soil is too soft. I screwed the piles down to about 5.5ft down - well below the toronto frost line. And each one was torqued with a 2 by 8 where i couldnt even turn it by hand anymore so those could support or more a car easily.
Newbie
Oct 8, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
When you use a 2 by 8 to torque the pylex helical pile and cant turn it anymore from 8 feet away its basically at the same torque as a machine or close to it. When it reaches that level of resistance it means its not budging any further down which means there mo than enough resistance to hold up any deck. If it still turns at 4 feet you need to add another extension til you get more torque. I didnt get a large amount of torque resistance til i hit 4.5 feet - which was basically just below construction fill. At 5 feet i had huge resistance which is what u want. Then you take a hammer and smack it down 4 or 5 time and then do ine last turn if you can and then your done.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 2, 2001
2583 posts
179 upvotes
Brampton
I used these for my shed, was using a 10 foot long 2x4 to screw them in, the last foot wasn't easy. Saved me a lot of time compared to digging up holes and using cement.
Strange thing i noticed about these is that there's nothing holding the adjusting threaded section to the actual screw. So if a hurricane comes by my shed will fly away since only its weight is holding it down, luckily i tapped a hole between the two pieces and added a bolt to hold them, probably not needed but whatever.
Deal Addict
Feb 5, 2009
2397 posts
554 upvotes
Newmarket
isn't rust a concern? when was this product introduced? I will be doing a deck in the next year or two and this looks like a perfect diy solution, but I am somewhat concerned about the durability, especially in the case of $20 unit made in China, powder coating finish if not applied properly may came off by the time the piece is fully in the ground, and a direct contact with the soil would make it rust in no time if the steel is not done right, I hope it's not the same manufacturer who makes Mazda's body ;-)
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2001
14156 posts
4628 upvotes
Homerhomer wrote:
Oct 14th, 2017 9:27 am
isn't rust a concern? when was this product introduced? I will be doing a deck in the next year or two and this looks like a perfect diy solution, but I am somewhat concerned about the durability, especially in the case of $20 unit made in China, powder coating finish if not applied properly may came off by the time the piece is fully in the ground, and a direct contact with the soil would make it rust in no time if the steel is not done right, I hope it's not the same manufacturer who makes Mazda's body ;-)
Screw piles are quite a popular option in commercial projects, especially those in environmentally sensitive areas where big machinery digger big holes is not desired. This PDF might help answer your question:
http://www.helicalpileworld.com/Dealing ... Davies.pdf
It goes through some examples of uncoated piles too.

I'm not an expert but I would suspect it's not reasonable to expect these to last "forever" as traditional concrete should last longer. But lasting for 20-50 years seems reasonable, and quite frankly, "forever" for most people installing them now.

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