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Queen's Master of Management Analytics

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 25th, 2018 5:23 pm
[OP]
Member
Dec 19, 2010
369 posts
28 upvotes

Queen's Master of Management Analytics

Anyone here that has experience with this program? Pros/cons? Did you get into the data sciences field and what was the quality of the employer pool recruiting at Queen's for this degree?

It's $45K however it's only a 12 month program which you can complete while working, very convenient from that perspective.
15 replies
Newbie
Oct 20, 2015
56 posts
1 upvote
Toronto, ON
What do they teach you with this degree?
Member
Aug 8, 2010
437 posts
44 upvotes
wth...45K? Serious? It costed me less than that to complete a 4 years degree in computer science

I think schools are in the money making business as well.
Deal Addict
Oct 16, 2013
2104 posts
514 upvotes
Toronto
1000islands wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 7:03 pm
wth...45K? Serious? It costed me less than that to complete a 4 years degree in computer science

I think schools are in the money making business as well.
Its a Master degree.
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2008
849 posts
178 upvotes
Markham
1000islands wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 7:03 pm
wth...45K? Serious? It costed me less than that to complete a 4 years degree in computer science

I think schools are in the money making business as well.
of course they are. https://www.google.ca/search?source=hp& ... UvanDjlFzE

doesn't mean that the degree has no value. I know a few grads from this program that have turned around their careers.
Deal Addict
Nov 13, 2013
1145 posts
414 upvotes
OTTAWA
1000islands wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 7:03 pm
wth...45K? Serious? It costed me less than that to complete a 4 years degree in computer science

I think schools are in the money making business as well.
Taxpayers chipped in as well for your 4 year degree.
Newbie
Oct 20, 2015
56 posts
1 upvote
Toronto, ON
What do they actually teach for this degree?
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2007
4391 posts
759 upvotes
Having graduated, had a career, and run a business, here are my 2 cents about post secondary education and career.

-Masters in business are worthless imo. Business "skill" is not really something you can learn from a classroom. Most case studies are "AFTER THE FACT". A business is successful, then scholars come up with reasons to suggest why they were successful. It's always easy to identify success factors after the fact. If I tell you to run a business and identify what to do NOW to make your business successful next year, you probably would be stumped. You can try to replicate certain things but a lot of things boil down to the details of specific opportunities. The enablers that happened 5 years ago are likely not available anymore or the opportunity is oversaturated by people trying to replicate the same success.

-To further devalue classroom education, let me tell you how important it is to manage people. You can't learn how to deal with people in a classroom. It's just something you have to experience and learn. It's guys learning to deal with girls. At first you may feel awkward asking a girl out. After being rejected enough times you eventually learn how to best do it.

-Universities are just money sucking businesses. Increasingly I find universities are run by people who are disconnected from the real world. I had a professor at UTM who never worked a day in a real office. He was an academic his whole career and he was teaching "management". Universities need to market themselves as the best. So they give you a lot of BS statistics to back it up. The reality is that if you achieve success after school, I'd say 90% of the success is due to factors not involving your university. You don't learn to dress/talk/posture better in class. All you learn are what a particular professor thinks is correct.

-If you want to advance your career, I think you are far better off just spending the time to work a real office job. Gain some experience and maybe work towards a CPA or CFA. There is no shortage of overeducated people who can't even secure entry level office jobs. If 4 years of undergrad didn't land you the job, why would more education do so? Business is not like medicine or hard sciences.
Member
Aug 8, 2010
437 posts
44 upvotes
BananaHunter wrote:
Nov 17th, 2017 12:30 pm
Having graduated, had a career, and run a business, here are my 2 cents about post secondary education and career.

-Masters in business are worthless imo. Business "skill" is not really something you can learn from a classroom. Most case studies are "AFTER THE FACT". A business is successful, then scholars come up with reasons to suggest why they were successful. It's always easy to identify success factors after the fact. If I tell you to run a business and identify what to do NOW to make your business successful next year, you probably would be stumped. You can try to replicate certain things but a lot of things boil down to the details of specific opportunities. The enablers that happened 5 years ago are likely not available anymore or the opportunity is oversaturated by people trying to replicate the same success.

-To further devalue classroom education, let me tell you how important it is to manage people. You can't learn how to deal with people in a classroom. It's just something you have to experience and learn. It's guys learning to deal with girls. At first you may feel awkward asking a girl out. After being rejected enough times you eventually learn how to best do it.

-Universities are just money sucking businesses. Increasingly I find universities are run by people who are disconnected from the real world. I had a professor at UTM who never worked a day in a real office. He was an academic his whole career and he was teaching "management". Universities need to market themselves as the best. So they give you a lot of BS statistics to back it up. The reality is that if you achieve success after school, I'd say 90% of the success is due to factors not involving your university. You don't learn to dress/talk/posture better in class. All you learn are what a particular professor thinks is correct.

-If you want to advance your career, I think you are far better off just spending the time to work a real office job. Gain some experience and maybe work towards a CPA or CFA. There is no shortage of overeducated people who can't even secure entry level office jobs. If 4 years of undergrad didn't land you the job, why would more education do so? Business is not like medicine or hard sciences.
Well said.

The most successful entrepreneurs probably never have taken a business course in university.
Member
Aug 8, 2010
437 posts
44 upvotes
raichu1 wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 8:29 pm
Its a Master degree.
What is Master means? I thought it means more in-depth study in a particular field. but the courses of this program are introductory courses of this and that fields.
Deal Addict
Mar 27, 2004
2584 posts
274 upvotes
Toronto
callmebob wrote:
Nov 13th, 2017 9:35 pm
Anyone here that has experience with this program? Pros/cons? Did you get into the data sciences field and what was the quality of the employer pool recruiting at Queen's for this degree?

It's $45K however it's only a 12 month program which you can complete while working, very convenient from that perspective.
What do you want to do with this degree? I'm sure it can help you get a job somewhere in data mining. Go for it. Specializiation is what will seperate you from others.
Realtor - Platinum award winner.
Jr. Member
Aug 5, 2017
121 posts
22 upvotes
BananaHunter wrote:
Nov 17th, 2017 12:30 pm
Having graduated, had a career, and run a business, here are my 2 cents about post secondary education and career.

-Masters in business are worthless imo. Business "skill" is not really something you can learn from a classroom. Most case studies are "AFTER THE FACT". A business is successful, then scholars come up with reasons to suggest why they were successful. It's always easy to identify success factors after the fact. If I tell you to run a business and identify what to do NOW to make your business successful next year, you probably would be stumped. You can try to replicate certain things but a lot of things boil down to the details of specific opportunities. The enablers that happened 5 years ago are likely not available anymore or the opportunity is oversaturated by people trying to replicate the same success.

-To further devalue classroom education, let me tell you how important it is to manage people. You can't learn how to deal with people in a classroom. It's just something you have to experience and learn. It's guys learning to deal with girls. At first you may feel awkward asking a girl out. After being rejected enough times you eventually learn how to best do it.

-Universities are just money sucking businesses. Increasingly I find universities are run by people who are disconnected from the real world. I had a professor at UTM who never worked a day in a real office. He was an academic his whole career and he was teaching "management". Universities need to market themselves as the best. So they give you a lot of BS statistics to back it up. The reality is that if you achieve success after school, I'd say 90% of the success is due to factors not involving your university. You don't learn to dress/talk/posture better in class. All you learn are what a particular professor thinks is correct.

-If you want to advance your career, I think you are far better off just spending the time to work a real office job. Gain some experience and maybe work towards a CPA or CFA. There is no shortage of overeducated people who can't even secure entry level office jobs. If 4 years of undergrad didn't land you the job, why would more education do so? Business is not like medicine or hard sciences.
I agree
And masters tend to be cash cows in Canada even if it's from queens/ivey/rotman
Deal Addict
Sep 4, 2007
1165 posts
546 upvotes
Edmonton
You can get a master's in comp sci, statistics, or engineering for less than half that price and they would probably take you a lot further.
Member
Aug 8, 2010
437 posts
44 upvotes
Just watch a video...the richest man in China said MBA is useless...

if you can understand Chinese:)
Newbie
May 4, 2016
76 posts
28 upvotes
BananaHunter wrote:
Nov 17th, 2017 12:30 pm
Having graduated, had a career, and run a business, here are my 2 cents about post secondary education and career.

-Masters in business are worthless imo. Business "skill" is not really something you can learn from a classroom. Most case studies are "AFTER THE FACT". A business is successful, then scholars come up with reasons to suggest why they were successful. It's always easy to identify success factors after the fact. If I tell you to run a business and identify what to do NOW to make your business successful next year, you probably would be stumped. You can try to replicate certain things but a lot of things boil down to the details of specific opportunities. The enablers that happened 5 years ago are likely not available anymore or the opportunity is oversaturated by people trying to replicate the same success.

-To further devalue classroom education, let me tell you how important it is to manage people. You can't learn how to deal with people in a classroom. It's just something you have to experience and learn. It's guys learning to deal with girls. At first you may feel awkward asking a girl out. After being rejected enough times you eventually learn how to best do it.

-Universities are just money sucking businesses. Increasingly I find universities are run by people who are disconnected from the real world. I had a professor at UTM who never worked a day in a real office. He was an academic his whole career and he was teaching "management". Universities need to market themselves as the best. So they give you a lot of BS statistics to back it up. The reality is that if you achieve success after school, I'd say 90% of the success is due to factors not involving your university. You don't learn to dress/talk/posture better in class. All you learn are what a particular professor thinks is correct.

-If you want to advance your career, I think you are far better off just spending the time to work a real office job. Gain some experience and maybe work towards a CPA or CFA. There is no shortage of overeducated people who can't even secure entry level office jobs. If 4 years of undergrad didn't land you the job, why would more education do so? Business is not like medicine or hard sciences.
Well said BUT i will play a devils advocate here:

While it is true of some of the shortcomings of classroom education and case studies are after the fact....What i believe is in life there are people falls in different categories of learning, achievements, drive..etc:

1) The gifted who goes against the status quo. These are the people who finds the general education of classroom learning unusual and can do extra things at will and be successful within their own capacity.
2) Hard worker who is within the status quo. These are the people who are just hard working and doesnt need to challenge the system but willing to work HARD within the system and be great success at...Luck will serve them
3) The go with the flow with whats setup . Not the hardworking, not the challenging the system kind of guy, willing to do necessary to get by and they are fine with the outcome
3) The misfit who is neither. This the guy who is not even willing to learn the system, doesnt know the system and just deals with what's in their way as it happens.

All in all, you need to assess, be honest about who you are as a person and where do you fall under.

A) If you are #1, you probably dont need MBA or a Masters or a MMA to be successful and you can come up with many interesting observations to convince people about your success without
it...But thats at individual level and dont confuse that
B) If you are #2, you may not have the creativity to work outside of a system but willing to pay the cost and work hard to earn a master's degree with clear vision that will set you up for even success...again you have to be honest with your self
C) If you are #3, you are okay without it, have a decent career, your priorities may not be that
D) If you are #4, that just not your drive and thats totally fine.

I am personally planning to study at Queens for the Masters in Management Analytics for these reasons:

1) 10 year progressive career, looking to resharpen my baseline with a Master's that fits in my 15-20 year plan...
2) Queen's is just a great school for my profile
3) Networking and being around a different mix of people that i've been used to in the last 10 years
4) Energy boost and refining my approach to my career and not be one industry attachment.

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