Food & Drink

question for coffee connoisseurs

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 11th, 2019 10:30 pm
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death_hawk wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 5:11 pm
Now I kind of want to try grinding and brewing them....
I know that one unconventional way of making hot chocolate is by tossing chocolate chips and mixing them in boiling water, I wonder if using those beans would make an unconventional mocha? Electric Light Bulb
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Cause you a coffee noob. You want something that you will enjoy.

Other than that, you could get a triple triple at McDonalds or anywhere else. You are not a coffee drinker, you aren't going to be able to enjoy a black coffee or even a coffee with a little 2% milk. You need to load it up with 18% cream and sugar. At that point, it doesn't matter what kind of coffee you drink. Get whatever is cheap or available.
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Rehan wrote:
Nov 13th, 2009 4:04 pm
All of you shut your mouths and leave the OP alone.
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nabiul wrote:
Feb 9th, 2019 9:06 pm
If you actually want to try coffee for what it is then get a single cup french press for $15 or so from a department store and a bag of medium roast 100% arabica coffee (pre ground if you don't have a grinder). Put in 1 tablespoon of coffee and pour in water that is hot but not boiling hot, wait 30-45 seconds and push down on the plunger and pour the coffee into a cup. Drink it as is, no sugar, no cream. If the coffee is too sour (acidic) then increase the water temperature next time, if the coffee is too light then increase the amount of grounds, if there's too much flavour going on and you want a duller more bitter drink then increase the steep time. Some coffees are just bad and no amount of 'adjustment' can make them taste good. A single bag of coffee goes a long way for one person drinking and the grounds will get stale by the time you're half way into the bag.
30-45 seconds is significantly shorter a brew time than I have ever heard for French Press. Usually would see mixing the grinds around the time but giving about 4 minutes before actually pouring seems to be the common timing. Could be great, but in my head just seems like way too short a time.
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EastGTARedFlagger wrote:
Feb 9th, 2019 8:23 pm
Don't waste your time with garbage like Tim Horton's, Second Cup, Coffee Culture, etc. Start with Starbucks and go up from there.
You’re a victim of American marketing if you somehow think Starbucks is higher quality coffee than Tim Hortons or Second Cup. Go to Starbucks for the free refills and comfortable chairs. That being said, based on published caffeine counts, it is actually possible Starbucks uses slightly more coffee per volume of water. But in our climate that isn’t necessarily an advantage, especially for a coffee novice.

The best feature of Tim Hortons coffee is that it is invariably freshly brewed, especially if you go for the original (medium).

To the OP, salt or food with sodium will make the bitter taste more tolerable. I can’t imagine going straight from hot chocolate to black coffee, so temporarily adding wilk would make the transition more tolerable. Milk already has sugar, so you shouldn’t really need to add any to your coffee, especially if you are eating something sweet like jam on toast or a donut.
Last edited by MonctonMan on Feb 11th, 2019 6:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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BongoBong wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 2:16 am
30-45 seconds is significantly shorter a brew time than I have ever heard for French Press. Usually would see mixing the grinds around the time but giving about 4 minutes before actually pouring seems to be the common timing. Could be great, but in my head just seems like way too short a time.
It’s far too short of a brew time. 30 seconds is typically just the bloom, it needs time to steep (3-4 min is typical).
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Instant coffee is generally from Vietnam (robusta). Not sure why anyone would go out of their way to buy an Asian brand. Just buy the cheapest. It will taste terrible at first, so be sure to to drink it with breakfast.
Note their is significantly more caffeine in robusta coffee.

Ideally you want to quickly develop your tastebuds so you can have any coffee and appreciate the differences. You don’t want to be that person arguing that McDonald’s coffee is better than Tim Hortons or, even worse, driving to Tim Hortons because you don’t like the taste of the free coffee at work. You eat more than 1 kind of vegetable or 1 kind a fruit, you certainly don’t want to be a slave to one blend of coffee.
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MonctonMan wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 6:45 am
The best feature of Tim Hortons coffee is that it is invariably freshly brewed, especially if you go for the original (medium).
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BongoBong wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 2:16 am
30-45 seconds is significantly shorter a brew time than I have ever heard for French Press. Usually would see mixing the grinds around the time but giving about 4 minutes before actually pouring seems to be the common timing. Could be great, but in my head just seems like way too short a time.
A drip brewer or moka pot only has the water in contact with the coffee for a few seconds before it passes into the collection area, there is a continuous stream of water mind you but the extraction process happens pretty much immediately. We use a bunn commercial brewer every day at work; have you ever watched the stream of water coming out of a drip brewer? About 1/3rd of the way through the brew the color completely changes from brown to dark champagne indicating that really weak watery coffee is coming out and 2/3rds of the way is pretty much just straight water diluting what has already been extracted. An aero press is pretty much the same too, this video indicates 50 seconds brew and 20-30 second plunge for strong coffee.


I have tried both short and long steep with a french press; you get different profiles of what is extracted and the longer you wait the less 'individual' a type of coffee becomes. An extremely short steep time of like 20 seconds or an immediate plunge will result in very acidic/ floral coffee. I think the aromatic compounds that contribute to the uniqueness of a coffee just vaporize if you wait too long.

EDIT: I just did an immediate plunge with near boiling water and blended arabica grounds, maybe 5-10 seconds total time that the grounds were in contact with water. It is light, chocolaty and aromatic but missing the bold thick body. Almost like drinking a coffee flavoured tea with a sweet and savory after taste. 30 seconds of steep time would do it for me and produce the balanced cup that I prefer. It's only a starting point for some one who is new to coffee to experiment.

As an afterthought, I am always disappointed by how fruity, chocolaty and amazing fresh grounds smell, but can never quite manage to capture that in the cup. If anyone knows the secret then I would very much like to know.
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No one will know for sure if you would prefer light, or dark coffee. Everyone has different taste and preferences. The best bet is just to Experiment and try them out for yourself. You might not like any of them, but at least you'll know.

When I started drinking coffee, it was at home, and it had cream, lots of cream. Then I went to French vanilla, which was a lot sweeter. I like stuff like hazelnut flavoured coffee. Still drank regular coffee with cream and sugar. If you Experiment with regular coffee. Try it black (no sugar or cream, or milk) you probably won't like it though. Then try it with a bit of sugar and cream, and add more if needed to suit to taste buds. You'll probably add quite a bit of sugar and cream if you like french vanilla though.

I don't drink coffee any more, but I would recommend trying different ones to see which ones you like best. With food and drinks, its really subjective to the end user, each to their own.
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Tim Hortons is not coffee. It's "caffeinated brown sludge beverage".
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konfusion666 wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 4:36 pm
Tim Hortons is not coffee. It's "caffeinated brown sludge beverage".
That isn't accurate. Tim Hortons coffee is coffee plus water. Their coffee is adapted to northern climates where the habit is slightly less coffee per millilitre of water. So to some southern tastebuds it could taste watery, especially if you are use to robusta instant coffee or dark roasted coffee, or simply home brewed coffee in a higher concentration.

Thicker coffee is what the locals drink in Brazil and Colombia, where warming up isn't the objective.

The coffee in Brazil tastes absolutely terrible at first because of how concentrated it is. But I assume if you stay long enough you could learn to like it.

Toronto is a very small part of Canada
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phuviano wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 1:51 pm
No one will know for sure if you would prefer light, or dark coffee. Everyone has different taste and preferences. The best bet is just to Experiment and try them out for yourself. You might not like any of them, but at least you'll know.
Since we generally don't drink coffee as children, almost every new blend of coffee that we haven't been exposed to before will taste terrible. Some coffee blends will take many cups to adapt to, some you can start to like by the time you get to the bottom. Nobody likes brocoli the first time they try it, but it would be pretty embarrassing for a grown adult to turn down broccoli. Same thing with coffee blends, roasts and brewing types.
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MonctonMan wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 8:10 pm
Since we generally don't drink coffee as children, almost every new blend of coffee that we haven't been exposed to before will taste terrible. Some coffee blends will take many cups to adapt to, some you can start to like by the time you get to the bottom. Nobody likes brocoli the first time they try it, but it would be pretty embarrassing for a grown adult to turn down broccoli. Same thing with coffee blends, roasts and brewing types.
Yup I agree with you. I wasn't sure if the OP was ready to try something over and over until he/she acquired a taste for it.

I myself evolved from double doubles to double doubles with milk. Then just milk. Then eventually just black coffee. I don't even drink coffee anymore though.
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