Automotive

Questions re: Civic 2006 care

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  • Jul 4th, 2006 7:18 pm
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May 10, 2003
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Questions re: Civic 2006 care

I was wondering re: Civic 2006

1. When jumping cables, the dealer told me about being careful about jumping cables between cars (ie. charing one car battery via the other) but I've never done it before, so I didn't get everything that he said. He said something about the alternator being at risk of damage if I hooked up the cables after I started the car. Any ideas what he might've meant?

2. the mp3 CD-player: does it play CD-RW's?

I'll add to this thread as more Q's come up :)

Thanks
18 replies
Deal Fanatic
Jan 13, 2005
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what that person mentioned to you is a general rule of thumb when boosting you shouldnt leave both cars idleing when the jumper cables are attached it could damage the car's computer.
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Mar 6, 2005
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espeed wrote:I was wondering re: Civic 2006

1. When jumping cables, the dealer told me about being careful about jumping cables between cars (ie. charing one car battery via the other) but I've never done it before, so I didn't get everything that he said. He said something about the alternator being at risk of damage if I hooked up the cables after I started the car. Any ideas what he might've meant?

2. the mp3 CD-player: does it play CD-RW's?

I'll add to this thread as more Q's come up :)

Thanks
For #2 I don't actually know but try it! If it's not compatible then it will just say Disc Error. Seems to me that it should have no problem though since it is an mp3 one, but you never know cause previous regular Honda players never played CD-RW.
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espeed wrote:I was wondering re: Civic 2006

1. When jumping cables, the dealer told me about being careful about jumping cables between cars (ie. charing one car battery via the other) but I've never done it before, so I didn't get everything that he said. He said something about the alternator being at risk of damage if I hooked up the cables after I started the car. Any ideas what he might've meant?

Thanks
When trying to assist another vehicle to start or using your vehicle to start another using jumper cables, my frst response is not to do it.
Several reasons,
1. if done improperly you can do serious damage to your computer.
2. the ground cable must be to a bare metal part on both cars and those are becoming difficult to find and if you are not sure of yours, and more importantly the other vehicles points, reason 1 certainly comes into play.
If it must be done, ensure ground cable is firmly and securely attached first, start the boosting vehicle, take positive and attach to the boosting vehicle's positive battery post and, and attach it ot the positive post on the recieving vehicle. Then try to start the recieving vehicle.
The reason for not hooking up the cables between vehicles first, then starting the boosting vehicle is because you are adding an additional battery to the start circuit and that can damage the vehicle that is doing the boosting. (starting on 24 or so volts and potentially 1000 or more amps)
Best to tell your buddy to join an auto club and get the service as part of the membership.
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Apr 21, 2003
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Pete_Coach wrote: The reason for not hooking up the cables between vehicles first, then starting the boosting vehicle is because you are adding an additional battery to the start circuit and that can damage the vehicle that is doing the boosting. (starting on 24 or so volts and potentially 1000 or more amps)
Best to tell your buddy to join an auto club and get the service as part of the membership.
You statement about the 24 volts is wrong. When you connect batteries in parallel (positive to positive, negative to negative), all you're doing is doubling the capacity...not the voltage...the voltage remains at 12 volts. If you connect it in series (positive terminal of one battery to the negative terminal of the other battery), then you are doubling the voltage to 24 volts. Basic electronics.

Also, you should connect the positive terminals first. By connecting the negative first, you are in danger of shorting the positive cable on a metal part of the car's body...basically the same as connecting the + and - terminals of the battery together. If you connect the positive first, you cannot accidentally short the battery by accidently touching a part of the cars body with the negative cable. The only way to do it is to actually touch the positive terminal of the battery with the negative cable.
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cipher wrote:You statement about the 24 volts is wrong. When you connect batteries in parallel (positive to positive, negative to negative), all you're doing is doubling the capacity...not the voltage...the voltage remains at 12 volts. If you connect it in series (positive terminal of one battery to the negative terminal of the other battery), then you are doubling the voltage to 24 volts. Basic electronics.

Also, you should connect the positive terminals first. By connecting the negative first, you are in danger of shorting the positive cable on a metal part of the car's body...basically the same as connecting the + and - terminals of the battery together. If you connect the positive first, you cannot accidentally short the battery by accidently touching a part of the cars body with the negative cable. The only way to do it is to actually touch the positive terminal of the battery with the negative cable.
You are right, but in practice it is often so difficult to find a good bare metal grounding point. Connecting the positive to the reciever withouth the reciever running is not as diffcult nor as dangerous as trying to search for a ground in a tight spot and accidentally making contact.
Yes also about the batteries in parralell but the power is still there and most importantly, there is power and current now in a "dead" battery.
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Apr 21, 2003
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Pete_Coach wrote:You are right, but in practice it is often so difficult to find a good bare metal grounding point. Connecting the positive to the reciever withouth the reciever running is not as diffcult nor as dangerous as trying to search for a ground in a tight spot and accidentally making contact.
Yes also about the batteries in parralell but the power is still there and most importantly, there is power and current now in a "dead" battery.
The danger in connecting the negative from the live car to the dead car is that you've completed 1/2 the circuit. Since the entire car is basically connected to negative of the battery, any metal that the positive clamp of the booster touches completes the other 1/2 of the circuit. Even if it's a poor contact it comes into, you will get one hell of a spark and possible damage the battery of the other vehicle. The proper procedure is to connect the positive first. Once the positive is connected, the only way to short out the battery with the negative clamp is to touch the positive of either battery.

Your advice to connect the negative terminals first is extremely dangerous.
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Good tips should be correct,
Please see the following the for the correct negative then positive procedure:
http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/ageng/ ... e1021w.htm particularily 6, 7 and 8
or http://www.ehow.com/how_511_jump-start-car.html particularily 4,5,6
or http://www.canadiandriver.com/winter/050126.htm

I try not to be dangerous, just helpful but, we can all learn something everyday.
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Aug 6, 2001
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your comment about not doing it is very selfish!

c'mon..when stuff happens, it happens..as human beings we can all try to be nice and helpful to each other..do it properly, you wont really damage ur car..
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weedb0y wrote:your comment about not doing it is very selfish!

c'mon..when stuff happens, it happens..as human beings we can all try to be nice and helpful to each other..do it properly, you wont really damage ur car..
I am sorry but I do not understand what you mean.
The unfortunate thing is that you can damage your car. Doing it wrong can do very big damage to your computer, alarm system or audio system. All of these are suceptable to power spike or surge damage and the in line fuses are not quick enough to react to prevent potential damage.
Interestingly enough there are quite a few incidents of this every winter.
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Aug 16, 2003
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The proper way to do it, as I've always understood it, is with the booster vehicle off, connect the positive terminal of the dead battery to the positive of the good battery, then the negative of the good battery to a good chassis or engine ground of the dead vehicle. The reason being that connecting the final connection may cause a spark, which should not be allowed to occur near the dead battery which may be venting flamable gasses in it's severly discharged state.

Then I typically start the vehicle with the dead battery, disconnect the jumpers in the opposite order that they were in connected, then start the good vehicle. I figure that if you leave the good vehicle running while jumping a dead battery, you're starting that vehicle from the good vehicle's alternator rather than it's battery. A good battery should EASILY be able to handle starting two engines one after the other. The dead battery in the circuit during startup should have zero effect on starting that vehicle since it is in parallel with the charged battery.

I've jumpstarted a dozen or so vehicles with this procedure (mine have usually been the vehicles with the good batteries. *shrug*) with zero problems, even in the dead of winter. Not a huge amount by any means but I'm still at 100%. ;)
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Aug 16, 2003
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Pete_Coach wrote:I am sorry but I do not understand what you mean.
The unfortunate thing is that you can damage your car. Doing it wrong can do very big damage to your computer, alarm system or audio system. All of these are suceptable to power spike or surge damage and the in line fuses are not quick enough to react to prevent potential damage.
Interestingly enough there are quite a few incidents of this every winter.
Learn how to do it properly and you won't have any problems. *shrug*
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Honda's OEM CD players from atleast 2004 play CD-RWs.
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Eli wrote:Learn how to do it properly and you won't have any problems. *shrug*
fully understand that and that is why I have been posting the proper procedures from many different sources to explain how to do it properly so opinions don't cloud correctness *shrug*.
The not understanding what he meant question was to weedboy
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Aug 16, 2003
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Pete_Coach wrote:fully understand that and that is why I have been posting the proper procedures from many different sources to explain how to do it properly so opinions don't cloud correctness *shrug*.
The not understanding what he meant question was to weedboy
You're clouding the issue more than anything else, what with reference to 24 volts and bizzare procedures to hook up and start the vehicles. Hooking up half of the circuit, starting the good vehicle, then hooking up the other half straight to the battery.... There's so many problems with that idea that I'm not sure where to start. And 24 volts? Unless someone is going from positive on one battery to negative on the other, totally ignoring the colour coding on the jumpers and the polarity signs on the batteries, that just isn't going to happen. And the reason to hook up to bare metal instead of the battery is because the fnail conection may create a spark as the dead circuits that are usually always on are energized on the dead car. You do NOT want this spark at the terminal of a discharged battery.

Please, don't create more problems. If you're unsure of how to do this yourself then don't post opinions or assumptions, someone's vehicle may be in jeopardy.
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